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Wendy Uhlmann, Scott Roberts, and Ray De Vries will serve as panelists on Monday, September 11th for FINDING COMMON GROUND: A Conversation on Genetics and Religion at the Ann Arbor Downtown Library.

More information can be found here.

Research Topics: 
Thu, November 09, 2017

Kayte Spector-Bagdady was recently quoted for The State Journal-Register article on the investigation of Southern Illinois University researcher, William Halford's genital herpes vaccine research.

Research Topics: 

Kayte Spector-Bagdady recently served on a Q&A panel for "Three Identical Strangers" at the State Theater. Professor Spector-Bagdady, a research ethicist, and Dr. Larry Perlman, a researcher involved in the original study, discussed the troubling research study at the heart of "Three Identical Strangers."

Mon, July 30, 2018

Patients fighting life-threatening illnesses who have run out of conventional options will get a chance to try some of the most cutting-edge treatments available, through a national effort that just received nearly $4.8 million in funding from the federal government.

Based at the University of Michigan, in partnership with Duke University, the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and the University of Rochester, the effort will build a national framework to help more patients gain access to experimental drugs, devices and biologics. It is funded by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.

The partner universities will build a national framework for more efficient, consistent and widespread use of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Expanded Access process, to help more hospitals offer experimental options to their patients and gather data on the impact.

MICHR will coordinate the new project, called TEAMSS for Transforming Expanded Access to Maximize Support and Study.

CBSSM will be involved to help ensure that use of Expanded Access is done in an ethical and responsible way, so that patients who have exhausted all their other options understand the risks involved in trying an unproven therapy.

Thu, April 12, 2018

The US Public Health Service exposed more than 1,300 Guatemalans to syphilis, gonorrhea, and other sexually transmitted infections without consent in the late 1940s.  Kayte Spector-Bagdady and Paul Lombardo worked on the 2011 US Presidential Bioethics Commission report condemning the Cold War experiments as “unconscionable,” which spurred calls for recompense of the victims, their descendants, and families. According to a new report by medical historians, human tissues from unethical experiments conducted in Guatemala in the 1940s might still rest on the shelves of US government labs.

 

Funded by National Institutes of Health.

Funding Years: 2011-2016

 

Making decisions about the medical care of a loved-one with acute brain hemorrhage is a difficult and frightening time for families. This project will work to improve the processes that doctors and families use to make these decisions in the future. For more information, visit NIH Reporter

PI(s): Darin Zahuranec, Brisa Sanchez

Co-I(s): Renee Anspach, Angela Fagerlin, Lewis Morgenstern, Phillip Rodgers

 

 

Funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, NIH.

Funding Years: 2010-2014

The overarching goal of this proposal is to improve decision making about organ quality in Liver Transplantation, specifically by increasing transparency, improving patient knowledge and satisfaction, and maintaining patient and public trust in the transplant system. In addition, this research may improve patient outcomes by ensuring that high risk organs go to patients who are most likely to benefit from them. For more information, visit NIH Reporter.

PI(s): Michael Volk

 

IHPI Seminar Series with Drs. Fagerlin & Zikmund Fisher

Mon, February 09, 2015, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 10, Research Auditorium

IHPI Seminar Series Featuring CBSSM Researchers Angie Fagerlin and Brian Zikmund-Fisher: "Numbers, numbers, numbers: It's not just what you present, but how you present them."

Angela Fagerlin, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Internal Medicine
Co-Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health
Research Associate Professor, Internal Medicine

Monday, February 9, 2015
3:00 pm to 4:00 pm
NCRC Building 10, Research Auditorium

Thu, July 21, 2011

A recently-published article by Susan Goold in the American Journal of Bioethics was the topic of a press release by the University of Michigan Health System.  Click here to view the press release and to read the editorial written by Goold and her colleague Matthew Wynia.  The article calls for engaging the public in deliberations about health care spending, especially what counts as a decent minimum set of health benefits, and was written in response to a paper by Lawrence J. Schneiderman, MD, of the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego.

Research Topics: 

Attitudes toward Return of Secondary Results in Genomic Sequencing (Sep-16)

Imagine you are at the doctor’s office because you (or your child) have a serious health condition like heart disease or cancer. To help find out whether any treatment options exist, your doctor suggests that you (or your child) have your genome sequenced.

Genome sequencing may provide information about your (or your child’s) current health condition. However, the genome sequencing could reveal additional and unexpected results not related to the current condition. The doctor wants to know what types of these secondary results you would want to be told.

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