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It is with both sadness and joy that we announce that CBSSM Co-Director Dr. Angela Fagerlin will be assuming a new position as the inaugural Chair of

Population Health Sciences at the University of Utah. While we are very sad to see Angie leave, we congratulate her on this well-deserved opportunity and are thrilled to see her enter this new stage in her career.

Dr. Fagerlin has been with the University of Michigan for 15 years and Co-Director of CBSSM for the last 5 years. She has been an integral member of CBSSM and all its precursors—the Program for Improving Health Care Decisions and The Center for Behavioral and Decision Sciences in Medicine. Dr. Fagerlin will be greatly missed for her friendship, collegiality, mentorship, and the great science she has produced over the years.

As of January 2016, current Co-Director of CBSSM Dr. Raymond De Vries will be joined by Dr. Brian Zikmund-Fisher, who will serve as an Interim Co-Director. Dr. Zikmund-Fisher is an Associate Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education at the School of Public Health, as well as a Research Associate Professor of Internal Medicine. He has been actively involved with CBSSM and its precursors for over 13 years and has many research collaborations and mentoring relationships with CBSSM faculty, fellows, and affiliates. Dr. Zikmund-Fisher looks forward to helping to grow CBSSM's many research and educational initiatives in the future.

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, a CBSSM investigator and Director of the CBSSM Internet Survey lab, is the principal investigator on an Investigator Initiated Research award from the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making that began in October 2008.  The grant, entitled "Learning by Doing: Improving Risk Communication Through Active Processing of Interactive Pictographs," will fund the development and testing of of Flash-based interactive risk graphics that research participants or patients can use to visually demonstrate how likely they believe some event is to occur. Dr. Zikmund-Fisher hopes that people who create risk graphics themselves will have a better intuitive understanding of risk than people who just view static images. Co-investigators on the award include Angela Fagerlin, Peter A. Ubel, and Amanda Dillard.

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, is the senior author on a study led by Donna M. Zulman, MD, that reveals about a third of doctors and their patients with diabetes do not agree on which of the patient's health conditions is most important. In the study, 38% of physicians (compared to 18% of patients) ranked hypertension as the most important condition. Patients were more likely to prioritize symptoms such as pain and depression. Read the article, in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, here. Read a press release about the article here.

Fri, February 28, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was quoted in a Scientific American article about risk communication of certain chemicals in the lives of expectant parents. He explains, “Look at your life and the choices you make, and do things that can make you safer easily, but don't overreact to anything ... There are very, very few things out there that have such huge effects on our lives or our baby's lives that one teeny bit of exposure is going to make a difference.”

PIHCD: Sarah Alvarez

Thu, November 05, 2015, 2:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Sarah Alvarez, a fellow at Stanford and formerly of Michigan Radio, will  present her work on creating a news product that can meet the information needs of low-income news consumers. Specifically her focus is on how to use data to discover which issues or systems information gaps exist for low-income news consumers and once the gaps are identified how the information should be presented to help people understand the information and use it to make decisions.

If you plan to attend this meeting please e-mail Nicole Exe at nexe@umich.edu by Monday November 2. If you decide to attend after that date you are still welcome and do not need to e-mail.

Thu, March 03, 2016

In an interview with MedicalResearch.com, Dr. Sarah Hawley discusses her new study regarding breast cancer patients' understanding of risk. She states, "Research has shown that breast cancer patients do not have a good understanding of their risk of distant recurrence, and and that the fear of cancer spreading is one of the biggest concerns that patients have. The research that has been done shows that most patients over-esimate this risk, and think they have a bigger chance of the cancer coming back than they actually have."

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Sarah Hawley, Reshma Jagsi and others were recently published in a JAMA Oncology research letter on breast cancer patient risk communication. They found that medical oncologists were found to be far more likely than surgeons to quantify risk estimates for patients and that patients who do not see a medical oncologist may make treatment decisions, including surgery, without all relevant risk information.

For the full article: http://oncology.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2491464

 

Subjective Numeracy Scale

The Subjective Numeracy Scale (SNS) is a self-report measure of perceived ability to perform various mathematical tasks and preferences for the use of numerical versus prose information. The SNS has been validated against objective numeracy measures and found to predict comprehension of risk communications and ability to complete utility elicitations.

The 8-item scale contains no mathematics questions and has no correct or incorrect answers. Instead, it consists of 4 questions asking respondents to assess their numerical ability in different contexts and 4 questions asking them to state their preferences for the presentation of numerical and probabilistic information. The SNS is both reliable and highly correlated with the Lipkus, Samsa & Rimer (2001) numeracy measure, and it has been validated in both risk communication and utility elicitation domains.

For a PDF version of this document and the SNS instrument, click here: Subjective Numeracy Scale PDF.  

Please contact Angie Fagerlin for versions in Dutch, Japanese, Norwegian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

SNS Questions

For each of the following questions, please check the box that best reflects your answer:

  • How good are you at working with fractions? (Not at all good – Extremely good)
  • How good are you at working with percentages? (Not at all good – Extremely good)
  • How good are you at calculating a 15% tip? (Not at all good – Extremely good)
  • How good are you at figuring out how much a shirt will cost if it is 25% off? (Not at all good – Extremely good)
  • When reading the newspaper, how helpful do you find tables and graphs that are parts of a story? (Not at all helpful – Extremely helpful)
  • When people tell you the chance of something happening, do you prefer that they use words ("it rarely happens") or numbers ("there's a 1% chance")? (Always prefer words – Always prefer numbers)
  • When you hear a weather forecast, do you prefer predictions using percentages (e.g., “there will be a 20% chance of rain today”) or predictions using only words (e.g., “there is a small chance of rain today”)? (Always prefer percentages – Always prefer words)
  • How often do you find numerical information to be useful? (Never – Very often)

Scoring Instructions

All questions use 6-point Likert-type scales with endpoints as marked. Response values increase left to right (1-6). Scoring is based on these values, except Question 7 is reverse coded (6-1) for consistency.

  • SNS: Average rating across all 8 questions (w/ Q7 reverse coded)
  • SNS ability subscale: Average rating on Questions 1-4
  • SNS preference subscale: Average rating on Questions 5-8 (w/ Q7 reverse coded)

To cite the scale, please use the following reference:

Fagerlin, A., Zikmund-Fisher, B.J., Ubel, P.A., Jankovic, A., Derry, H.A., & Smith, D.M.  Measuring numeracy without a math test: Development of the Subjective Numeracy Scale (SNS). Medical Decision Making, 2007: 27: 672-680.

In any discussions about the validation of the scale, please use the following reference:

Zikmund-Fisher, B.J., Smith, D.M., Ubel, P.A., Fagerlin, A.  Validation of the subjective numeracy scale (SNS): Effects of low numeracy on comprehension of risk communications and utility elicitations. Medical Decision Making, 2007: 27: 663-671.

Dean Shumway, MD

Faculty

Dean Shumway is an Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology with the University of Michigan Health System and the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center. He received his M.D. from the University of Chicago and completed his residency training at the University of Michigan, where he served as Chief Resident. His research focuses on advancing the quality of care received by breast cancer patients, with emphasis on improving individualized care by developing interventions to enhance decision making.

Last Name: 
Shumway

Julie Wright Nunes, MD, MPH

Faculty

Julie Wright Nunes is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan Department of Internal Medicine. Her research interests include Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and its prevention and also the development of methods and tools to help facilitate and optimize provider-directed CKD patient education.

Last Name: 
Wright Nunes

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