Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query about us interactive decision month.

Page not found

You are here

Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Funding years: 2009-2013

This grant supports a study to understand the barriers facing physician faculty researchers and women, in particular, by assessing gender differences in access to research time, mentoring, and institutional support and to understand the mechanisms by which gender differences in outcomes develop among career development awardees. Deliverables will include annual written reports about project status to RWJF and the PFSP National Program Office and attendance at the annual PFSP national meeting and one other scientific meeting annually of the Scholar's choosing, as applicable to the project.

More information: http://www.rwjf.org/en/grants/grant-records/2009/06/mixed-qualitative-and-quantitative-investigation-into-the-barrie.html

PI: Reshma Jagsi

Fri, February 28, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was quoted in a Scientific American article about risk communication of certain chemicals in the lives of expectant parents. He explains, “Look at your life and the choices you make, and do things that can make you safer easily, but don't overreact to anything ... There are very, very few things out there that have such huge effects on our lives or our baby's lives that one teeny bit of exposure is going to make a difference.”

Tue, April 08, 2014

Lewis Morgenstern’ s stroke education study offered in public schools in Texas to help children recognize symptoms of stroke is cited by Yahoo News, NPR, Fox News, and many other news outlets. Morgenstern was quoted, "The data was highly positive in terms of knowledge about stroke and their intention to call 911... The earlier we can make people aware of stroke and that it's arguably the most treatable of all catastrophic conditions, the better off we will be."
 

Research Topics: 

Raymond De Vries is co-author on a new publication in Academic Medicine, highlighting a successful model for collaboration which was developed in the early phases of a grant funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation nearly five years ago. The Collaborative Health Alliance for Reshaping Training, Education, and Research (CHARTER) project expanded the partnerships between the University of Michigan and several Ghanaian academic institutions to enhance health care provider education and build and/or increase research capacity. One of the early goals of the grant was to establish guiding principles for engagement through a Charter of Collaboration.


Read more about the partnership through UMHS News and the origional PubMed article.

Thu, September 18, 2014

A new study put out by senior author Beth Tarini, MD, MS, shows that primary care doctors report challenges to incorporating genetics assessments in routine primary care. Dr. Tarini commented, "Genetics is not just about rare diseases and specialists. PCPs [Primary Care physicians] rely on genetics frequently during preventive care visits – especially when taking family histories and assessing a patient’s risk of more common, but chronic, diseases. So the fact that PCPs report many barriers to embracing and performing these tasks is concerning," The study also found that many Primary Care physicians feel as though their expertise on genetic medicine is insufficient.

Susan Dorr Goold, M.D., M.H.S.A., M.A., professor of Internal Medicine, and Health Management and Policy, was awarded a two-year, $391,000 grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to engage Michigan communities in deliberations about Medicaid priorities. Led by Goold and community partner Zachary Rowe, the project will engage communities in a priority setting exercise using the Choosing Health Plans All Together (CHAT) exercise. The award-winning CHAT tool provides structure, feedback and adaptability. It has a been used by multiple policy makers and community organizations, and a solid record of published research.

 

Mon, January 05, 2015

Reshma Jagsi was interviewed by mCancerTalk for the article, “Is your course of radiation treatment longer than it needs to be?” which focuses on two of her radiation treatment studies. In one of her studies, looking at a national database of patients, she and her colleagues found that hypofractionated radiation therapy was used in only 13.6% of Medicare patients with breast cancer. In Michigan, Jagsi’s other study found, fewer than one-third of patients who fit the criteria for offering this approach got the shorter course of treatment.

Read Dr. Jagsi’s paper about hypofractionation use nationally and in Michigan.

Geoffrey Barnes is lead author on study published in the American Journal of Medicine finding new anticoagulants are driving increase in atrial fibrillation treatment and reducing warfarin therapy use.

“The data provides a promising outlook about atrial fibrillation which is known for being undertreated,” says lead author Geoffrey Barnes, M.D., MSc.,  cardiologist at the University of Michigan Health System and researcher at the Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.  “When we don’t treat atrial fibrillation, patients are at risk for stroke. By seeking treatment, patients set themselves up for better outcomes.”

More details can be found here.

CBSSM Seminar: Stephen Molldrem, PhD Candidate

Thu, July 07, 2016, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 16, Conference Rm 266C

Stephen Molldrem, PhD Candidate, American Culture

Title: Collecting and Managing Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data in Health Contexts: Bioethical Dilemmas from a Queer Historical Perspective

Abstract: This talk, drawn from dissertation research, historicizes a number of regulatory changes governing the collection and management of sexual orientation and gender identity data in health contexts in the United States that have taken place since 2009. It focuses on a range of less-considered bioethical dilemmas that stem from the introduction of questions about sexual orientation and gender identity into the battery of demographic information collected in certified Electronic Health Record technologies.

Attitudes toward Return of Secondary Results in Genomic Sequencing (Sep-16)

Imagine you are at the doctor’s office because you (or your child) have a serious health condition like heart disease or cancer. To help find out whether any treatment options exist, your doctor suggests that you (or your child) have your genome sequenced.

Genome sequencing may provide information about your (or your child’s) current health condition. However, the genome sequencing could reveal additional and unexpected results not related to the current condition. The doctor wants to know what types of these secondary results you would want to be told.

Pages