Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query news events press coverage 2017 04 24.

Page not found

You are here

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2012-2017

Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) occurs in many patients with intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Recent studies have found IVH is a predictor of poor outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage and that hydrocephalus develops in 55% intracerebral hemorrhage patients with IVH. Hydrocephalus is also a major problem in SAH. Early hydrocephalus occurs in 20-50% SAH patients and is associated with poor clinical grade. However, the mechanisms of IVH-induced hydrocephalus are not well understood. Lysis of erythrocytes results in iron accumulation in the brain and causes brain damage after intracerebral hemorrhage. However, the role of erythrocyte lysis and iron toxicity in IVH-induced brain injury and hydrocephalus has still to be elucidated. Erythrocyte lysis after IVH may start very early. Hemoglobin released from red blood cells reaches its peak concentration by the second day following injection of blood into the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs. Hemoglobin release, from lysis of erythrocytes in human intracranial hemorrhage, increases during the first few days. Erythrocyte lysis appears to result from either depletion of intracellulr energy reserves or activation of the complement system. We have established an IVH model in rats and long-term ventricular dilatation has been observed. Recently we have found that hydrocephalus occurs in a model of SAH which results in intraventricular blood. Our preliminary data have demonstrated: 1) Intraventricular injection of autologous whole blood causes iron accumulation, hydrocephalus, neuronal death and brain tissue loss in the hippocampus; 2) Intraventricular injection of lysed erythrocytes rather than packed erythrocytes causes hydrocephalus by 24 hours; 3) Heme oxygenase-1 and ferritin levels are increased significantly in the hippocampus and periventricular areas following IVH; 4) Intraventricular injection of iron alone can also result in acute hydrocephalus; 5) Deferoxamine, an iron chelator, reduces IVH-induced hydrocephalus and hippocampal tissue loss. In this application, we propose to test the following specific aims: 1) Determine whether erythrocyte lysis and hemoglobin release cause hydrocephalus and neuronal death following IVH; 2) Determine whether complement inhibition reduces erythrocyte lysis and IVH/SAH-induced brain injury; 3) Examine the natural time courses of iron buildup, oxidative stress and upregulation of iron handling proteins in the brain after IVH; 4) Determine whether heme oxygenase inhibition reduces heme degradation and IVH/SAH-induced brain injury; and 5) Determine whether iron chelation reduces oxidative stress, hydrocephalus and neuronal death after IVH/SAH in aged rats. The purpose of our project is to investigate the mechanisms of brain injury after IVH. The long-term goal of our studies is to limit hemorrhagic brain damage in patients.

PI(s): Guohua Xi

Co-I(s): Ya Hua, Richard Keep, Lewis Morgenstern

Along with Ted A. Skolarus, M.D., M.P.H., CBSSM Co-Director, Angela Fagerlin authored a Viewpoint article titled "Rethinking Patient-Physician Communication of Biopsy Results -- The Waiting Game." In the article, they conclude, "Telemedicine approaches can potentially relieve much of the anxiety associated with in-person consultations while delivering bad news in a timely, compassionate, and patient-centered manner."

Jeff Kullgren's editorial "Injecting Facts Into the Heated Debates Over Medicaid Expansion" was recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. In this editorial, Dr. Kullgren reviews Wherry and Miller's study on the effects of ACA on coverage, access, utilization, and health. 

Wherry LR, Miller S. Early coverage, access, utilization, and health effects associated with the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansions. A quasi-experimental study. Ann Intern Med 2016

Link to IHPI article.

Masahito Jimbo, MD, PhD, MPH


Masahito Jimbo is Professor of Family Medicine and Urology at the University of Michigan. Having worked as a family physician in both urban (Philadelphia) and rural (North Carolina) underserved areas, he has first-hand knowledge and experience of the challenges faced by clinicians and healthcare institutions to be successful in providing patient care that is personal, comprehensive, efficient and timely. Initially trained in basic laboratory research, having obtained his MD and PhD degrees at Keio University in Tokyo, Japan, Dr.

Last Name: 

H. Myra Kim, ScD


H. Myra Kim is a Research Scientist at the Center for Statistical Consultation and Research and and Adjunct Professor at the Department of Biostatistics. She received her Sc.D. in Biostatistics from Harvard University in 1995 and worked at Brown University as an Assistant Professor from 1995 to 1997. She has worked at UM since 1997 and has collaborated with various researchers from around the UM community as well as from other universities.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 

Carl Schneider, JD


Carl E. Schneider is the Chauncey Stillman Professor for Ethics, Morality, and the Practice of Law and is a Professor of Internal Medicine. He was educated at Harvard College and the University of Michigan Law School, where he was editor in chief of the Michigan Law Review. He served as law clerk to Judge Carl McGowan of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and to Justice Potter Stewart of the United States Supreme Court. He became a member of the Law School faculty in 1981 and of the Medical School faculty in 1998. 

Last Name: 
Thu, April 04, 2013

Babies cry and spit up … and too often those common symptoms are labeled as disease, according to a new study conducted by U-M researchers. Frequent use of the GERD label can lead to overuse of medication. The study was published online today in the journal Pediatrics.

Stories have already been published by Reuters,  Yahoo News!MedPage TodayNPRMSN Healthy Living,  CBS News, and the Chicago Tribune, among others. Laura Scherer, PHD, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, Angela Fagerlin, PhD and Beth Tarini, MD are authors on this study.


Wed, August 27, 2014, 11:00am to 2:00pm
Circle Drive in front of Med Sci I


This will be the first year that CBSSM will be participating in Researchpalooza. Please come and enjoy the fun!


Wednesday, August 27, 2014
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Circle Drive in front of Med Sci I


All UMHS employees from the Hospitals and Health Centers and Medical School are invited to celebrate this annual event.

Stop by the University Hospital Courtyard and Medical School Circle Drive for:

  • Ice Cream sundaes and sugar-free alternatives
  • Karaoke and musical entertainment
  • Festival Games
  • Department and vendor tables with information and giveaways


For more info:

Mon, October 30, 2017

In a recent US Department of Health and Human Services symposium, Andrew Shuman discussed patient data privacy.

Kathryn Moseley served as one of the judges at "The Big Ethical Question Slam 5" hosted by In addition, Naomi Laventhal, Michele Gornick, Christian Vercler, Lauren Smith, and Lauren Wancata served as judges at the "Michigan Highschool Ethics Bowl 2."

Thanks to all the CBSSM folks who contributed their time!

For more information about these events and other great ethics-related activites, go to

A short video about the Highschool Ethics Bowl can be found here.