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Funded by National Institutes of Health; Nationatal Institute on Aging

Funding Years: 2012-2017

A cornerstone of the nation’s social science research infrastructure, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. families. Begun in 1968, 36 waves of data have now been collected on PSID families and their descendents. Its long-term measures of economic and social well-being have spurred researchers and policy makers to attend to the fundamental dynamism inherent in social and behavioral processes. This project collects, processes, and disseminates three modules in the 2013 and 2015 waves of the PSID:
1.Health module: Including 15 minutes of survey questions on health status, health behaviors, health insurance coverage & health care costs. Linkages to the National Death Index and Medicare will be extended;
2.Wealth module: Including 10 minutes of survey questions on wealth, active savings, and pensions. Linkage to Social Security earnings and benefits records for active sample and decedents will be undertaken for the first time, and a new module to minimize errors in reports of wealth changes will be developed and implemented; and
3.Well-being module with related psychosocial measures: A mixed-mode (web/mail out) questionnaire to collect content from both respondents and spouses about their well-being and related psychosocial measures (e.g., personality, intelligence), with an experiment to identify (and allow researchers to adjust for if necessary) mode effects.

PI(s): Robert Schoeni

Co-I(s): Mick Couper, Vicki Freedman, Katherine McGonagle

Sat, March 03, 2018

Reshma Jagsi's work was recently highlighted in Emergency Medicine News: "Special Report: Sexual Harassment a Muddle of Fear, Guilt, and Shame."

Research Topics: 

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2012-2017

Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) occurs in many patients with intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Recent studies have found IVH is a predictor of poor outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage and that hydrocephalus develops in 55% intracerebral hemorrhage patients with IVH. Hydrocephalus is also a major problem in SAH. Early hydrocephalus occurs in 20-50% SAH patients and is associated with poor clinical grade. However, the mechanisms of IVH-induced hydrocephalus are not well understood. Lysis of erythrocytes results in iron accumulation in the brain and causes brain damage after intracerebral hemorrhage. However, the role of erythrocyte lysis and iron toxicity in IVH-induced brain injury and hydrocephalus has still to be elucidated. Erythrocyte lysis after IVH may start very early. Hemoglobin released from red blood cells reaches its peak concentration by the second day following injection of blood into the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs. Hemoglobin release, from lysis of erythrocytes in human intracranial hemorrhage, increases during the first few days. Erythrocyte lysis appears to result from either depletion of intracellulr energy reserves or activation of the complement system. We have established an IVH model in rats and long-term ventricular dilatation has been observed. Recently we have found that hydrocephalus occurs in a model of SAH which results in intraventricular blood. Our preliminary data have demonstrated: 1) Intraventricular injection of autologous whole blood causes iron accumulation, hydrocephalus, neuronal death and brain tissue loss in the hippocampus; 2) Intraventricular injection of lysed erythrocytes rather than packed erythrocytes causes hydrocephalus by 24 hours; 3) Heme oxygenase-1 and ferritin levels are increased significantly in the hippocampus and periventricular areas following IVH; 4) Intraventricular injection of iron alone can also result in acute hydrocephalus; 5) Deferoxamine, an iron chelator, reduces IVH-induced hydrocephalus and hippocampal tissue loss. In this application, we propose to test the following specific aims: 1) Determine whether erythrocyte lysis and hemoglobin release cause hydrocephalus and neuronal death following IVH; 2) Determine whether complement inhibition reduces erythrocyte lysis and IVH/SAH-induced brain injury; 3) Examine the natural time courses of iron buildup, oxidative stress and upregulation of iron handling proteins in the brain after IVH; 4) Determine whether heme oxygenase inhibition reduces heme degradation and IVH/SAH-induced brain injury; and 5) Determine whether iron chelation reduces oxidative stress, hydrocephalus and neuronal death after IVH/SAH in aged rats. The purpose of our project is to investigate the mechanisms of brain injury after IVH. The long-term goal of our studies is to limit hemorrhagic brain damage in patients.

PI(s): Guohua Xi

Co-I(s): Ya Hua, Richard Keep, Lewis Morgenstern

Wed, February 03, 2016

Beth Tarini, MD, MS and colleagues are back in the news regarding their 2013 article in Pediatrics entitled, “Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?” Their article was cited in CNNCBS NewsNew York TimesAnnarbor.com and many others. 

Citation: Allexan SS,  Byington CL, Finkelstein JI, Tarini  BA (2013 ). "Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?" Pediatrics; DOI: 10.1542/peds.2012-1438 [Epub ahead of print]

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Masahito Jimbo, MD, PhD, MPH

Faculty

Masahito Jimbo is Professor of Family Medicine and Urology at the University of Michigan. Having worked as a family physician in both urban (Philadelphia) and rural (North Carolina) underserved areas, he has first-hand knowledge and experience of the challenges faced by clinicians and healthcare institutions to be successful in providing patient care that is personal, comprehensive, efficient and timely. Initially trained in basic laboratory research, having obtained his MD and PhD degrees at Keio University in Tokyo, Japan, Dr.

Last Name: 
Jimbo

H. Myra Kim, ScD

Faculty

H. Myra Kim is a Research Scientist at the Center for Statistical Consultation and Research and and Adjunct Professor at the Department of Biostatistics. She received her Sc.D. in Biostatistics from Harvard University in 1995 and worked at Brown University as an Assistant Professor from 1995 to 1997. She has worked at UM since 1997 and has collaborated with various researchers from around the UM community as well as from other universities.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Kim

Lewis B. Morgenstern, MD, director of the stroke program at the University of Michigan Health System, was honored by the American Stroke Association at the International Stroke Conference 2015. He received the William Feinberg Award for Excellence in Clinical Stroke for ongoing contributions to clinical science investigation and management of stroke. The award recognizes a Stroke Council Fellow actively engaged in patient-based research who has made significant contributions to clinical stroke research. Read more.

Dr. Jeremy Sussman spoke at the Michigan Center for Diabetes Translational Research (MCDTR) Symposium. The MCDTR held its annual symposium on May 6, featuring a keynote presentation by Dr. Elbert Huang. This year the symposium was held at NCRC, Building 10 Auditorium (presentations) and building 18, lower level dining area (for poster session and buffet lunch). There was a poster presentation area where one can view the displays during and after lunch. RSVP to Pam Campbell at pamcamp@umich.edu.

The Department of Internal Medicine is deeply appreciative of the many extraordinary contributions made by its staff employees on a daily basis. Beginning in FY15, in an effort to formally acknowledge those contributions, annual Awards for Excellence have been awared to staff who embody the values reflected in the department’s Guiding Principles for Service Excellence - integrity, empathy and professionalism.

CBSSM's Center Manager Valerie Kahn and Research Associate Knoll Larkin were recognized for their hard work and contributions to the department. Congratulations!

Read more.

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