Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query news events press coverage 2014 01 31.

Page not found

You are here

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-Agency for Health Care Research and Quality

Funding Years: 2014-2016

This grant aims to engage communities, particularly underserved communities, in informed deliberations about current and potential changes to Medicaid eligibility, coverage, and cost-sharing. Building on community-based research partnerships state-wide, we will convene a Steering Committee including community leaders, researchers, decision makers in private healthplans and the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) and other stakeholders. We will adapt an innovative, award-winning web-based simulation exercise, CHAT (CHoosing All Together, usechat.org) in which individuals and groups make tradeoffs between competing needs for limited resources. Options in Medicaid-CHAT may include variations in covered benefits; out-of-pocket spending; population health and public health programs; rewards for healthy behaviors; and quality improvement activities. We will facilitate deliberations throughout the state, disproportionately sampling medically underserved communities and balancing locale (urban, suburban, rural and remote rural) and sociodemographic characteristics, ensuring inclusion of particular perspectives, e.g., those with chronic illness and those who are or will soon be eligible for Medicaid coverage or dually eligible.

We will prepare policy briefs describing the views of Michigan citizens about Medicaid eligibility, coverage, and cost-sharing and implications for policy. We aim to communicate Medicaid priorities of communities and the policy implications to state leaders, community leaders, insurers, and other stakeholders. We will examine the impact of public engagement on participants’ knowledge, attitudes, and priorities, and explore the impact on policy decisions.

We will also evaluate the effect of deliberations including a key element of deliberative procedures – representation.

PI(s): Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA

Co-I(s): A. Mark Fendrick, MD; Hyungjin Kim, PhD; Richard Lichtenstein, MD

Risk Sense has posted a new item written by Brian Zikmund-Fisher entitled, 'When Risk Communications Are Precise, Accurate and Utterly Meaningless.'

Risk communications can be accurate and precise representations of risk likelihoods yet meaningless when their quantitative precision is both (a) unnecessary for effective decision making and (b) and distracting, thereby preventing the audience from understanding the simpler “gist" that they do need for decision making. Click here for more information.

 

 

Masahito Jimbo, MD, PhD, MPH

Faculty

Masahito Jimbo is Professor of Family Medicine and Urology at the University of Michigan. Having worked as a family physician in both urban (Philadelphia) and rural (North Carolina) underserved areas, he has first-hand knowledge and experience of the challenges faced by clinicians and healthcare institutions to be successful in providing patient care that is personal, comprehensive, efficient and timely. Initially trained in basic laboratory research, having obtained his MD and PhD degrees at Keio University in Tokyo, Japan, Dr.

Last Name: 
Jimbo

Michael Fetters, MD, MPH, MA

Faculty

I serve as Professor of Family Medicine, Director of Japanese Family Health Program, and Co-Director of the Michigan Mixed Methods Research and Scholarship Program at the University of Michigan. In addition to being a family/general doctor fluent in Japanese, I have long been interested in the influence of culture on medical decision making and ethics, and have conducted numerous health research projects, and published numerous papers in English and Japanese.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Fetters

H. Myra Kim, ScD

Faculty

H. Myra Kim is a Research Scientist at the Center for Statistical Consultation and Research and and Adjunct Professor at the Department of Biostatistics. She received her Sc.D. in Biostatistics from Harvard University in 1995 and worked at Brown University as an Assistant Professor from 1995 to 1997. She has worked at UM since 1997 and has collaborated with various researchers from around the UM community as well as from other universities.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Kim
Fri, January 31, 2014

Susan Goold is co-author on an article "Focus Groups Highlight That Many Patients Object To Clinicians Focusing On Costs," which was ranked #15 of the Top 15 Most-Read Health Affairs articles for 2013.

Research Topics: 

Carl Schneider, JD

Faculty

Carl E. Schneider is the Chauncey Stillman Professor for Ethics, Morality, and the Practice of Law and is a Professor of Internal Medicine. He was educated at Harvard College and the University of Michigan Law School, where he was editor in chief of the Michigan Law Review. He served as law clerk to Judge Carl McGowan of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and to Justice Potter Stewart of the United States Supreme Court. He became a member of the Law School faculty in 1981 and of the Medical School faculty in 1998. 

Last Name: 
Schneider

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2014 - 2019.

The Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) Project is an ongoing stroke surveillance study that began in 1999. BASIC is the only ongoing stroke surveillance project focusing on Mexican Americans. Mexican Americans are the largest segment of the Hispanic American population, the United States' largest minority group. Since the inception of this project, we have assembled a cohort of over 4,992 cerebrovascular disease patients whom we are able to follow for recurrent cerebrovascular events as well as mortality. This gives us tremendous power to detect associations with biological and social risk factors for stroke, important to Mexican Americans as well as the broader United States population. We have demonstrated increased stroke incidence and recurrence in Mexican Americans. Stroke severity and ischemic stroke subtypes are similar between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Mortality following stroke appears to be less in Mexican Americans. In the next five years we are positioned to delineate trends in stroke rates, and to explore the potential reasons for the increased stroke burden in Mexican Americans, as well as their improved survival. This information will be critically important to all populations to reduce the devastation of stroke. We will continue to make important observations useful for planning delivery of stroke care in communities. For the first time we will investigate functional and cognitive outcome following stroke in Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites.

PI(s): Lynda Lisabeth, Lewis Morgenstern

Co-I(s): Brisa Sanchez

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2014 - 2016.

Mexican Americans (MAs) suffer more from stroke than non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). Ischemic stroke is more common in MAs and their neurologic, functional and cognitive outcomes after stroke are worse than in NHWs. The reasons for the disparity in post-stroke outcome are unclear. Pre-stroke function and initial stroke severity are similar between the two groups as are ischemic stroke sub-types. One potential explanation for the worse post-stroke neurologic, functional and cognitive outcome in MAs compared with NHWs is allocation and effectiveness of post-stroke rehabilitation. There is remarkably little data demonstrating whether rehabilitation is dosed differently for MAs compared with NHWs, and still less information about whether, for a given dose of rehabilitative services following stroke, there is differential benefit by ethnicity. The current application will utilize the existing population-based Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC, NSR0138916) project's infrastructure and strong community relations to develop and pilot a method to collect the necessary data to determine the role of rehabilitation in ethnic disparities in post-stroke outcomes. Previous studies have suggested that looking at overall time spent in rehabilitation does not predict post-stroke outcome. However, specific components of physical, occupational and speech therapy, a practice-based approach, has been shown to be associated with stroke outcomes, and these associations have been shown to vary by race. However, this practice-based approach has not been implemented in a population-based manner across the range of settings where stroke patients receive rehabilitation services, and no study has used this approach in an ethnically diverse population. Therefore, our plan is to build on previous work by developing and utilizing a practice-based design in our population-based stroke study. Specifically, we will 1) continue to build the needed relationships with rehabilitation service providers in the community;2) work with local rehabilitation therapists to refine data collection instruments as part of the practice-based design;3) pilot test data collection of specific rehabilitation components of post-stroke rehabilitation across all rehabilitation settings;and 4) analyze this data to determine the feasibility of this approach for a larger study and to provide preliminary data on differences in access and effectiveness by ethnicity. In total, our infrastructure development, refinement of tools to measure specific therapy modalities and pilot testing will position us perfectly to submit an R01 application to identify ethnic differences in access to rehabilitation and specific rehabilitation services associated with improved functional outcome in MAs and NHWs.

PI(s): Lynda Lisabeth, Lewis Morgenstern

Pages