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ELSI-LHS Symposium

Wed, November 15, 2017, 8:00am to 4:00pm
Location: 
Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave

Join us for our 2nd annual symposium and workshop on the ethical, legal and social implications of learning health systems (ELSI-LHS).


This year's focus will be on data and knowledge sharing.


NOV 15 - 8:00 am - 4:00 pm: The symposium will lay out the ELSI of data sharing and translation in learning health systems that strive to be both FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) and fair. The day will interactively address critical issues on data and knowledge sharing.


Speakers include John Wilbanks, Elizabeth Pike, Kenneth Goodman, Debra Mathews, Peter Embi, Peter Singleton, Warren Kibbe, Joon-Ho Yu and more to come!


Proceeds will be synthesized into draft recommendations for data and translation to practice & streamline future ELSI-LHS research.


We have issued a Call for Poster Abstracts to be included in the 2nd annual symposium. Poster displays should relate to the conference theme, "Data and Knowledge Sharing," and may relate to either ELSI or technical aspects of learning health systems. Abstracts and posters should be developed for an interdisciplinary audience including social scientists, informaticians, health care providers, and community members.


To submit an abstract, please go to: 2017 ELSI Abstract Submission
#elsilhs

CBSSM is a co-sponsor of this event.

PIHCD: Sarah Alvarez

Thu, November 05, 2015, 2:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Sarah Alvarez, a fellow at Stanford and formerly of Michigan Radio, will  present her work on creating a news product that can meet the information needs of low-income news consumers. Specifically her focus is on how to use data to discover which issues or systems information gaps exist for low-income news consumers and once the gaps are identified how the information should be presented to help people understand the information and use it to make decisions.

If you plan to attend this meeting please e-mail Nicole Exe at nexe@umich.edu by Monday November 2. If you decide to attend after that date you are still welcome and do not need to e-mail.

Wed, February 03, 2016

Beth Tarini, MD, MS and colleagues are back in the news regarding their 2013 article in Pediatrics entitled, “Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?” Their article was cited in CNNCBS NewsNew York TimesAnnarbor.com and many others. 

Citation: Allexan SS,  Byington CL, Finkelstein JI, Tarini  BA (2013 ). "Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?" Pediatrics; DOI: 10.1542/peds.2012-1438 [Epub ahead of print]

Research Topics: 
Tue, April 08, 2014

Reshma Jagsi’s study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology about financial decline in breast cancer survivors has been cited by various health media outlets, including Bio-Medicine, Health News Digest, and various other outlets. The study found that after receiving treatment, a quarter of breast cancer survivors were found to be worse off financially. 

Sarah Hawley, PhD, MPH

Faculty

Dr. Sarah T. Hawley is a Professor in the Division of General Medicine at the University of Michigan and a Research Investigator at the Ann Arbor VA Center of Excellence in Health Services Research & Development. She holds a PhD in health services research from the University of North Carolina and an MPH from Yale University Department of Public Health. Her primary research is in decision making related to cancer prevention and control, particularly among racial/ethnic minority and underserved populations.

Last Name: 
Hawley

CBSSM co-sponsored the 15th Annual Waggoner Bioethics Lecture on November 3, 2010, hosting a breakfast in honor of the speaker, Dr. Bernard Lo, Director of the Program in Medical Ethics at UCSF.  The Waggoner lecture is organized by the Department of Psychiatry in honor of Dr. Raymond Waggoner, chair of the department from 1937 to 1970.

Joel Howell, MD, PhD

Faculty

Joel D. Howell is a Professor at the University of Michigan in the departments of Internal Medicine (Medical School), Health Management and Policy (School of Public Health), and History (College of Literature, Science, and the Arts), as well as the Victor C. Vaughan Professor of the History of Medicine. He received his M.D. at the University of Chicago, and stayed at that institution for his internship and residency in internal medicine. At the University of Pennsylvania, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar, and received his Ph.D. in the History and Sociology of Science.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Howell

PIHCD- Matthew Corriere

Wed, February 15, 2017, 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC bldg 16 B004E

Matthew Corriere- Applying elicited patient preferences to treatment choices for peripheral artery disease

Registration is now open for the April 25, 2017 CBSSM Research Colloquium & Bishop Lecture in Bioethics. This event is free and open to the public. Registration is encouraged, as it will help us to estimate numbers for catering and lunch. Please RSVP by April 18th.

The keynote address is the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics, an endowed lectureship made possible by a gift from the estate of Ronald C. and Nancy V. Bishop.  Norman Daniels, PhD will present the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: “Universal Access vs Universal Coverage: Two models of what we should aim for."

Norman Daniels, PhD is Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Location: Great Lakes Room, Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
 
Click here to register for the Colloquium!

Click here for the Colloquium Schedule and Presentation Abstracts.

Bioethics Grand Rounds -Scott Grant MD, MBE

Wed, May 24, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Auditorium

Scott Grant, MD, MBE, University of Chicago: "Dealing with complications and poor outcomes and surgical futility"

Scott Grant, MD, MBE, University of Chicago

Abstract: Surgical complications are ubiquitous and effect all surgeons. This talk will review how surgical ethics is distinct from traditional medical ethics in that surgeons have a greater and more direct responsibility for the outcomes of their patients than medical doctors. It will review how surgery harms before healing and the importance of weighing risks and benefits in decision making. Ways of assessing perioperative risk and preventing complications will be reviewed. Strategies for coping with complications will be described. Human error theory and the "Swiss cheese" model of human error will briefly be discussed. The SPIKES protocol for breaking bad news will be reviewed. Different definitions of futility will be described. Various procedural approaches to futility disputes will be analyzed. The best tool in approaching challenging "futility" situations will be described - open and honest communication between the patient or surrogate and the physician.

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