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Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-Agency for Health Care Research and Quality

Funding Years: 2014-2016

This grant aims to engage communities, particularly underserved communities, in informed deliberations about current and potential changes to Medicaid eligibility, coverage, and cost-sharing. Building on community-based research partnerships state-wide, we will convene a Steering Committee including community leaders, researchers, decision makers in private healthplans and the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) and other stakeholders. We will adapt an innovative, award-winning web-based simulation exercise, CHAT (CHoosing All Together, usechat.org) in which individuals and groups make tradeoffs between competing needs for limited resources. Options in Medicaid-CHAT may include variations in covered benefits; out-of-pocket spending; population health and public health programs; rewards for healthy behaviors; and quality improvement activities. We will facilitate deliberations throughout the state, disproportionately sampling medically underserved communities and balancing locale (urban, suburban, rural and remote rural) and sociodemographic characteristics, ensuring inclusion of particular perspectives, e.g., those with chronic illness and those who are or will soon be eligible for Medicaid coverage or dually eligible.

We will prepare policy briefs describing the views of Michigan citizens about Medicaid eligibility, coverage, and cost-sharing and implications for policy. We aim to communicate Medicaid priorities of communities and the policy implications to state leaders, community leaders, insurers, and other stakeholders. We will examine the impact of public engagement on participants’ knowledge, attitudes, and priorities, and explore the impact on policy decisions.

We will also evaluate the effect of deliberations including a key element of deliberative procedures – representation.

PI(s): Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA

Co-I(s): A. Mark Fendrick, MD; Hyungjin Kim, PhD; Richard Lichtenstein, MD

Funded by Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making

Funding Years: 2007 -2008

 

The National Survey of Medical Decisions (the DECISIONS study), co-led by CBDSM investigators Mick Couper (PI) and Brian Zikmund-Fisher (co-I), is a unique effort to collect nationally representative data about when and how middle-aged and older adults manage the medical decisions they face.

The DECISIONS study consisted of a random digit dial telephone survey of 3,010 adults over the age of 40 in the United States conducted between November 2006 and May 2007.  Participants were asked a series of screening questions to identify which of 10 common medical decisions they may have discussed with their health care providers in the previous two years and then completed 2-3 question modules regarding specific decisions that were relevant to each individual. 

Its initial screening module gathered highly generalizeable data regarding the prevalence of different types of common medical decisions in the experience of older Americans.  Its dynamically-administered modules then requested detailed information regarding how and when patients discuss key medical decisions with their health care providers and whether variations in decision-making processes may have influenced patients’ medical care. 

Funded by the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making (FIMDM), the DECISIONS project has been a highly collaborative project that has included investigators from Institute for Social Research and FIMDM, as well as CBDSM. In addition, FIMDM-affiliated researchers from around the country are analyzing DECISIONS data to inform their research. While the initial papers from the DECISIONS dataset will be by core investigators, the study team intends to make the dataset publicly available for more widespread use sometime in 2009.

Mick Couper (PI)

This month’s Bioethics Grand Rounds features Alan Tait, Ph.D., endowed professor and director of clinical research, Department of Anesthesiology.

He will present at the Ford Auditorium at noon on May 22.

Please feel free to bring your lunch and join us for a lively discussion of medical ethics. The Bioethics Grand Rounds is sponsored by the UMHS Adult Medical Ethics Committee and the Program of Society and Medicine. This educational session is open to all faculty and staff and members of the public.

CME and CEU credit is available.

Web Address: http://www.med.umich.edu/adultethics

2012 CBSSM Research Colloquium

Fri, May 18, 2012 (All day)

The 2012 Research Colloquium presentations by U-M faculty, fellows and students highlighted research on medical decision making.  The colloquium presenters and their topics were as follows:

  • Melissa Constantine, PhD: Making a baby in the 21st century: An updated user manual
  • Vida Henderson, PharmD, MPH, MFA, and Deliana Ilarraza: Using community-based participatory research and user-centered design approaches in developing an interactive diabetes decision aid
  • Naomi Laventhal, MD, MA, and Stephanie Kukora, MD: Resident attitudes toward ethical and medical decision-making for neonates born at the limit of viability
  • Kathryn Moseley, MD, MPH: Distrust of pediatricians' sleep advice: Focus group results from the Project for African American Infant Safety
  • Laura Scherer, PhD: What's in a name? The effect of a disease label on parents' decision to medicate a colicky infant
  • Lauren Smith, MD: Cracking the code: Ethical issues involved in the decision to undergo genetic testing
  • Ralph Stern, MD: The myth of individual risk
  • Wendy Uhlmann, MS, CGC: The swinging gate: Genetic testing and ethical issues

Bioethics Grand Rounds with Jeffrey Punch, MD

Wed, September 24, 2014, 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Ford Auditorium

Grand Rounds

Box Lunches will be provided courtesy of the Center For Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine.

This month's grand rounds features Jeffrey Punch, MD.

Please join us for a lively discussion of medical ethics. The Bioethics Grand Rounds is sponsored by the UMHS Adult Medical Ethics Committee and the Program of Society and Medicine. This educational session is open to all faculty and staff and members of the public. CME and CEU credit is available.

 

Bioethics Grand Rounds with Aisha Langford, PhD

Wed, December 10, 2014, 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Ford Auditorium

Grand Rounds for December

Box Lunches will be provided courtesy of the Center For Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine.

This month's grand rounds features Aisha Langford, PhD.

Please join us for a lively discussion of medical ethics. The Bioethics Grand Rounds is sponsored by the UMHS Adult Medical Ethics Committee and the Program of Society and Medicine. This educational session is open to all faculty and staff and members of the public. CME and CEU credit is available.

 

Mon, April 16, 2012

When women at high risk of breast cancer viewed a customized web-based decision guide about prevention options, they were more likely to make a choice about prevention and to feel comfortable with their choice.  CBSSM co-director and study senior author Angela Fagerlin is quoted in the press release.  Click here to view a press release about the study, whose authors included current CBSSM faculty member Brian Zikmund-Fisher and CBSSM alumni Peter Ubel and Dylan Smith.

CBSSM Colloquium 2016-- call for abstracts

2016 CBSSM Research Colloquium – University of Michigan

 

Call for Abstracts

 

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) Research Colloquium will be held Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at the Founders Room, Alumni Center, 200 Fletcher Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium will feature the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  This year CBSSM is delighted to announce that William Dale, MD, PhD will present the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: "Why Do We So Often Overtreat, Undertreat, and Mistreat Older Adults with Cancer?"

William Dale, MD, PhD is Associate Professor of Medicine and Chief, Section of Geriatrics & Palliative Medicine & Director, SOCARE Clinic at the University of Chicago. A geriatrician with a doctorate in health policy and extensive experience in oncology, Dr. Dale has devoted his career to the care of older adults with cancer -- particularly prostate cancer. Dr. Dale has a special interest in the identification and treatment of vulnerable older patients who have complex medical conditions, including cancer. He is actively researching the interactions of cancer therapies with changes associated with aging.
 

 

Abstract submissions are welcome from all disciplines both within UM, as well as other institutions. CBSSM is an interdisciplinary center focusing on bioethics and social sciences in medicine. Our research program areas of interest include:

  • Clinical and Research Ethics - committed to empirical research in ethics (what some have called empirical ethics) by providing an evidence base for informed policy and practice.
  • Health Communication and Decision Making – using techniques from basic and applied research, determines the best practices for communicating health information to patients.
  • Medicine and Society - examines the way health care and bioethics are influenced by social structures and cultural ideas.
  • Health, Justice, and Community - aims to improve knowledge, understanding and practice in resource allocation and distributive justice, ethics of health policy (public and private) and community engagement, with the overarching goal of improving health equity.
  • Genomics, Health, and Society - examines the ethical, social and behavioral implications of advances in genomics.

For more information about our program areas: http://cbssm.med.umich.edu/


Submission Details: (Form is below)

  • Abstracts should contain a title, followed by the names and designations of all contributing authors and the contact details of the corresponding author.
  • Abstracts are to be a maximum of 300 words in length (exclusive of title and author information).
  • Presentations should last no more than 20 minutes, with an additional 5 minutes for questions.  The total time allotted is therefore 25 minutes per presentation. 
  • Abstracts should be submitted on the attached Abstract Submission form.  Submit abstracts via email to Kerry Ryan, kryanz@med.umich.edu. If you have questions about the abstract, please contact CBSSM at 734-615-8377 or email Kerry Ryan.
  • Deadline for abstract submission is Friday, March 11, 2016.
  • Notification:  Applicants will be notified by Friday, March 25, 2016.


Tentative Schedule for the Colloquium:


9:00-10:30 Presentations
10:45-12:00 Bishop Lecture:  William Dale, MD, PhD
12:00-1:15 Lunch
1:15-4:30 Presentations

Click here for Abstract Submission Form.

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-Agency for Health Care Research and Quality

Funding Years: 2013 - 2016.

Both patient-centered care approaches and health information technology advances (e.g. patient portals to electronic health records) are increasing how often patients are directly presented with medical test results that identify health concerns, monitor health status, or predict future health risk. In principle, such data enable patients to actively mange health conditions and participate in care decisions. In practice, availability of data may not result in understanding, as test results are often presented in confusing formats with little context. Many patients, especially those with lower numeracy skills (i.e., poor ability to draw meaning from numbers), may be unable to interpret test outcome data and use it in decision making. For these patients, knowing test results or risk estimates does not ensure that they understand what those numbers imply or what actions they need to consider. Such data can be, quite literally, meaning-less, and patients are likely ignore such information in decision making even when they are fully informed.
We propose to draw on research methodologies from design science, decision psychology, human-computer interaction, and health communication and integrate them into a single, highly innovative research process that will tackle the problem of how best to present Hemoglobin A1c values and similar test results to patients with diabetes as an exemplar of the larger problem of meaningless medical test data. We will (a) define the problem space from multiple perspectives, (b) clarify what we can hope to achieve when we present diabetic patients with their test results, and (c) and identify possible approaches for improving data meaningfulness. Our iterative research approach involves three phases. In Phase 1, we will use intensive deep dive design sessions (a methodology borrowed from design science) with a multidisciplinary team combining experts in health communication and human-computer interaction with both practicing clinicians and expert patients. These sessions will identify discrepancies between patient needs for test result data and the formats in which such data are provided to patients, identify when low numeracy skills will be a barrier to patient interpretation and use of such data, and brainstorm potential solution concepts. In Phase 2, we will conduct rigorous comparative evaluations of proposed designs using (a) user-experience design sessions, and (b) an iterative sequence of large-sample, multi-factorial, randomized-controlled experiments in order to identify what formats make test data most meaningful and useful for facilitating informed patient decisions about medical care. In Phase 3, we will take our identified test results communication best practices and develop, program, and disseminate a test results display generator application that will be able to be integrated with existing electronic health record systems and other applications and will be made available to patients via a freely available website.

PI(s): Brian Zikmund-Fisher

Co-I(s): Angela Fagerlin, Reshma Jagsi, Predrag Klasnja, Kenneth M. Langa, Beth A. Tarini,, Sandeep Vijan

Fri, November 04, 2011

Angela Fagerlin's research was featured in a November 2, 2011, article in the Chicago Tribune, on improving the communication of information about cancer treatment risks to patients.  Tips for improving communication include using plain language, focusing on absolute risk, considering risk as a frequency rather than as a percentage, and so on.

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