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CBSSM joined 75+ exhibitors from labs and offices of the Medical School and across campus for the 2017 Researchpalooza.

Sponsored by the Office of Research, Researchpalooza is the perfect opportunity for colleagues and friends to have a great time and meet, mingle, and learn more about many of the organizations that offer their stellar services to faculty, students, and staff, all at one convenient time and location.

Fri, October 27, 2017

An older Behavioral Economics study by Brian Zikmund-Fisher and Andrew Parker was recently highlighted in a Nerdwallet Blog about the continued demand for rent-to-own contracts.

Research Topics: 
Fri, November 17, 2017

Naomi Laventhal and Kayte Spector-Bagdady were quoted in Michigan Medicine for the article, "Born at the Right Time" about an artificial placenta being developed at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital for the treatment of extreme prematurity.

CBSSM Faculty, Kayte Spector-Bagdady, Ray De Vries, and Lisa Harris, along with Lisa Low recently co-authored a Hastings Center Report article, "Stemming the Standard-of-Care Sprawl" about clinician self-interest and the case of electronic fetal monitoring.

Link to article here.

Research Topics: 

The Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences at Michigan State University has posted information about its 2011-12 Brown Bag/Webinar Series.  All sessions take place 12-1 pm in C-102 East Fee Hall on the East Lansing campus.  Sessions for the fall include:
September 7: Helen Veit, PhD, "The ethics of aging in an age of youth: Rising life expectancy in the early twentieth century United States"
October 19: Scott Kim, MD, PhD, "Democratic deliberation about surrogate consent for dementia research"
November 10: Stuart J. Youngner, MD, "Regulated euthanasia in the Netherlands: Is it working?"
December 7: Karen Meagher, PhD candidate, "Trustworthiness in public health practice"
See www.bioethics.msu.edu/ for more information.

This National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)-funded study seeks to explore the mental conceptualizations of risk of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) among residents in Midland/Saginaw (M/S), Michigan, who live in areas that have been exposed to DLCs.  The CPOD study is using a combination of in-depth qualitative "mental models" interviews (for comparison with an "expert" model) and a larger, population-based survey questionnaire to yield a rich base of knowledge and information about community members' beliefs and understandings about dioxins and dioxin-related health risks.  This, in turn, will inform evidence-based recommendations for designing better, more appropriate risk communication messages for the community and for other dioxin exposure assessment studies.  Specifically, we seek to distinguish between those dioxin-related concepts, facts, or beliefs that are already well understood by most community members (which therefore could be minimized in future communications) from those misconceptions or factual omissions that most directly inhibit effective risk management by community members.  We are also contrasting models of people who know their personal exposure (through prior participation in the University of Michigan Dioxin Exposure Study) versus those who do not.  Brian Zikmund-Fisher is the PI of this study.

Funded by Department of Veterans Affairs

Funding Years: 2009-2012

Because CRC-predictive genetic tests offer the potential to optimize CRC screening efforts, improving the communication and use of such tests by the millions of veterans who are screened for CRC each year could result in both improved cancer surveillance and more efficient (and potentially reduced) VA resource utilization. Our study will provide empirical data about practical risk communication methods that can be used in the future by VA clinicians to present genetic tests to veterans and about patient-level barriers which will inhibit acceptance of genetic tests that predict colorectal cancer risk within the VA patient population. By evaluating alternate methods of communicating genetic test results before such tests actually become available, we hope to identify optimal approaches that can be integrated into VA genomics initiatives from the very start.

Angela Fagerlin (PI)

Thu, July 25, 2013

Dr. Arul Chinnaiyan and his team have been awarded 1 of 4 research grants ($7.97 million pending) from the National Institutes of Health to explore the use of genome sequencing in medical care. The new grants are funded as part of the National Human Genome Research Institute's (NHGRI) Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) program. NHGRI is part of NIH.

The team will sequence the genomes of tumors from 500 patients with advanced sarcoma or other rare cancers to discover new information about genomic alterations, with the goal of eventually customizing therapies. Few clinical trials have been conducted in most rare cancers, and scientists would like to know more about the genetic underpinnings of these diseases. Investigators also plan to evaluate the patient consent process, and the delivery and use of genome sequencing results.

Several CBSSM-affiliated faculty are involved with this project, including Scott Kim, Scott Roberts, Raymond De Vries, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, as well as Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Michele Gornick.

Fri, August 16, 2013
1 in 5 women don't believe a tailored breast cancer risk assessment, according to a new study published by CBSSM researchers.

The findings were published in Patient Education and Counseling as part of a larger study where women participated in an online program to learn about medications that can reduce their risk of breast cancer. As part of the program, women who were at above-average risk of developing breast cancer received tailored information about their personal breast cancer risk. The risk assessment tool took into account family history and personal health habits, yet nearly 20 percent of women did not believe their breast cancer risk.

The study has also recently been discussed in CBS “Morning Rounds” (go to 1:45 of video clip) and NPR Shots.

Lead author Laura Scherer completed the research while serving as a CBSSM Post-Doctoral Research Fellow. Senior author Angela Fagerlin is the Co-Director of CBSSM and the Director of the CBSSM Post-Doctoral Fellowship Program.

CBSSM Seminar: Michele Gornick, PhD

Thu, January 15, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC 16-266C

Michele Gornick, PhD

VA HSRD Fellow & CBSSM Research Investigator

Title: The public’s preferences for the return of secondary findings identified through genome sequencing: Information and deliberation make a difference

Summary: Genomic sequencing is becoming a part of clinical practice. Existing studies are limited and conclude that people would like unrestricted access to all of their genetic information. However, we do not know the extent to which respondents in these studies took into account the complex scientific and ethical issues that attend genome sequencing. In order to address this gap, we organized a deliberative democracy (DD) session to educate members of the public on genome sequencing, to engage them in dialogue about the benefits and risks of the clinical implementation of this technology, and to elicit their informed perspectives about policies governing the return of secondary findings.

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