Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query about us interactive decision month.

Page not found

You are here

CBSSM's Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, is the lead author on a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine showing that women are less likely than men to receive major funding for scientific research. The study also found that only a quarter of all researchers (men and women) who received major early-career awards received further federal funding within five years. Additional authors are Amy Motomura, Kent Griffith, and Soumya Rangarajan. Read a press release about the article here.

Victor Strecher, Ph.D., M.P.H., professor of health behavior & health education, SPH, and professor of health behavior, Family Medicine, was presented with the 2014 Elizabeth Fries Health Education Award at the 65th Annual Meeting of the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE). The James F. and Sarah T. Fries Foundation honored Strecher for pioneering the development of computer tailored health programs that have transformed the way people learn about and manage their health.

Tue, April 08, 2014

Reshma Jagsi’s study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology about financial decline in breast cancer survivors has been cited by various health media outlets, including Bio-Medicine, Health News Digest, and various other outlets. The study found that after receiving treatment, a quarter of breast cancer survivors were found to be worse off financially. 

Cengiz Salman, MA

Research Associate

Cengiz joined the CBSSM in November 2014. He received his MA in Social Science from the University of Chicago and his BA in anthropology from Michigan State University. Prior to completing his MA, Cengiz researched political movements in Turkey with the assistance of a Fulbright IIE award. Cengiz will be providing research support to Dr. Susan Goold on a grant-funded study of Medicaid expansion. Cengiz enjoys spending time with family and friends, reading about philosophy and contemporary politics, and traveling.

 

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Salman

PIHCD Working Group: Michael McKee

Wed, May 06, 2015, 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Michael McKee will be speaking about a grant proposal to help elucidate how stigmatization in health care affects the quality of health care and access to care among Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users and characterize their main sources.  Both preliminary and published data illustrate that Deaf ASL individuals report a repetitive pattern of negative experiences with health care providers and institutions.  Medical advancements and public health safety net systems have failed to achieve health equity for Deaf ASL users.

CBSSM Co-Director Raymond De Vries presented at the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues on Sept. 2 about how to insure that the public has a voice in creating bioethics policies.

The September 2nd Presidential Commission meeting in Washington, DC, including Dr. De Vries's talk on the topic of "Fostering and Measuring Success in Ethics and Deliberation", is now available to be viewed online.

Jeff Kullgren recently received a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to carry out a national survey to examine the extent to which consumers who are in high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) engage in behaviors that help them optimize value. The goal of the project is to inform policymakers, payers, health systems, providers and consumers about the frequency and perceived effects of value-promoting consumer behaviors in HDHPs. Visit this link to learn more!

CBSSM Seminar: Aaron Scherer, PhD

Wed, February 03, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Aaron Scherer, PhD


CBSSM Postdoctoral Fellow

The Language of Medicine

Is the way we talk about health and medicine simply expressive or does the language we use actually change how we perceive and respond to health risks and medical interventions? Aaron Scherer will discuss a number of studies that explore how metaphors, labels, and explanations may shape our health-related perceptions and behavior.

Fri, May 08, 2015

Researchers surveyed more than 1,500 breast cancer patients in Detroit and Los Angeles and found that 35 percent had a strong interest in genetic testing. Many of those interested in genetic testing were also concerned about their own future risk of other types of cancer, according to the study in the current issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Reshma Jagsi, Sarah Hawley and Stephen Katz were involved with this study.

Research Topics: 

CBSSM's Elias Baumgarten, Raymond De Vries, Kayte Spector-Bagdady, Michele Gornick, & Adam Marks (no pictured) were judges at the 2017 A2Ethics High School Ethics Bowl January 28-29th. Click here for more details about this event.


Research Topics: 

Pages