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CBSSM was well-represented at the annual American Society for Bioethics & Humanities (ASBH) in Kansas City, MO (Oct 19-22) and the Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) in Pittsburgh, PA (Oct 22-25).

At ASBH, Andrew Shuman, Susan Goold, Kayte Spector-Bagdady, Janice Firn, Kerry Ryan, Michele Gornick, Stephanie Kukora, Naomi Laventhal, and Christian Vercler presented.

At SMDM, Michele Gornick, Sarah Hawley, and Dean Shumway presented. Several CBSSM alumni also presented.
 

Tue, April 10, 2018

In light of the #MeToo campaign denouncing sexual assault and harassment, Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil has written a perspective piece in the New England Journal of Medicine about sexual harrassment in academic medicine. This perspective piece and a recent survey published in JAMA related to sexual harassment and gender bias in academic medicine has been highlighted in multiple media outlets.

Mon, January 05, 2015

Reshma Jagsi was interviewed by mCancerTalk for the article, “Is your course of radiation treatment longer than it needs to be?” which focuses on two of her radiation treatment studies. In one of her studies, looking at a national database of patients, she and her colleagues found that hypofractionated radiation therapy was used in only 13.6% of Medicare patients with breast cancer. In Michigan, Jagsi’s other study found, fewer than one-third of patients who fit the criteria for offering this approach got the shorter course of treatment.

Read Dr. Jagsi’s paper about hypofractionation use nationally and in Michigan.

Fri, May 08, 2015

The vaccine appears to slow spread in those with advanced breast cancer. Sarah Hawley was quoted, "The preliminary finding that the vaccine improved progression-free survival in patients with metastatic cancer [when the disease has spread to other parts of the body] is especially exciting because of the lack of good treatments for metastatic breast cancer... If the authors can replicate this result in future trials in metastatic and non-metastatic or newly diagnosed patients, this will represent an important direction for the field of breast cancer treatment research."

CBSSM Seminar: Jacob Solomon, PhD

Thu, November 19, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Jacob Solomon, PhD


CBSSM Postodoctoral Fellow

Title:

Designing the information cockpit: The impact of customizable algorithms on computer-supported decision making

Abstract:

Intelligent systems that provide decision support necessitate interaction between a human decision maker and powerful yet complex and often opaque algorithms. I will discuss my research on end-user control of these algorithms and show that designing highly customizable decision aids can make it difficult for decision makers to identify when the system is giving poor advice.

"Still Alice" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Thu, October 15, 2015, 7:00pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Forum Hall, Palmer Commons

"Still Alice" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Free Admission

Moderator:    Raymond De Vries, PhD

Panelists:     Nancy Barbas, MD
                  J. Scott Roberts, PhD

Refreshments provided.

Based on Lisa Genova’s bestselling novel. In an Oscar winning performance, Julianne Moore plays Alice Howland, a renowned neurolinguistics professor at Columbia University who is diagnosed with familial, early onset Alzheimer’s Disease. The film provides insight into the patient’s perspective and the challenges patients, families, and caregivers face. The film also raises important bioethical questions related to patient autonomy, genetic testing, and personhood in the face of dementia.

CBSSM Seminar: Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD

Wed, December 09, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room B004E

Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD


CBSSM Postdoctoral Fellow

From the Guatemala STD Experiments to the NPRM for Revisions to the Common Rule: Why We Still Don’t Have Human Subjects Research Ethics Right

While much has been made of scandals, and academics zealously deliberate nuances, we still find ourselves revisiting the most basic of human subjects research ethics questions: What is a research subject? What is informed consent? This talk will address this ongoing debate but also the less often asked question of why—what are the structural pressures that bring us time and again to step one and is human subjects research ethics a zero sum game?

Wed, September 09, 2015

Raymond De Vries is quoted in a Dutch national newpaper, Volkskrant, regarding a recent AMC Netherlands and University of Amsterdam study comparing infant mortality in mid-wife led versus obstetrician-led care in the Netherlands. Dr. De Vries provides a positive review of the methodology and the colloborative nature of the study (which includes both midwives and obstetricians).

The Volkskrant article is in Dutch, but the study published in the journal "Midwifery" is in English.

Research Topics: 

Interim Co-Director Brian Zikmund-Fisher was featured in “Medicine at Michigan.” Brian shared his personal experience with risk and probability in medical decision making.  This experience provided him with the personal career goal of improving patients’ lives by making health information easier to understand.

This is the first featured story in the new section “Gray Matters,” which gives our faculty members the opportunity to write about complex issues in medicine, such as ethics and decision-making.

"A Calculation of Risk"

Mon, October 19, 2015

Beth Tarini is lead author on study published in the Journal of Pediatrics that found that few primary care physicians say they would order genetic testing or refer a child to a genetics specialist as a first step when they see children with two or more developmental delays, despite the higher risk of genetic disorders in these children.

Brian Zikmund-Fisher and Wendy Uhlmann are also co-authors.

Citation:

Tarini, Beth A., Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, Howard M. Saal, Laurie Edmondson, and Wendy R. Uhlmann. "Primary Care Providers' Initial Evaluation of Children with Global Developmental Delay: A Clinical Vignette Study." The Journal of Pediatrics.

Research Topics: 

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