Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query news events press coverage 2015 10 19.

Page not found

You are here

Wed, February 15, 2017

According to a study by Reshma Jagsi and colleagues, doctors often fail to recommend genetic testing for breast-cancer patients, even those who are at high risk for mutations linked to ovarian and other cancers. They surveyed 2,529 breast-cancer patients and found that although two-thirds of the women reported wanting genetic testing, less than a third actually got it. About 8 in 10 women at highest risk for BRCA mutations — because of family history or ancestry — said they had wanted testing, but only a little more than half received it.

Mon, April 17, 2017

A new piece by Brian Zikmund-Fisher and former CBSSM post-doc, Laura Scherer is out in the Conversation, "Maximizers vs. minimizers: The personality trait that may guide your medical decisions – and costs." They developed and validated a 10-item questionnaire that assesses a person’s maximizing or minimizing tendencies on a scale, from one (strong minimizing) to seven (strong maximizing). Across four studies, they found this difference predicts health care use across a range of medical interventions and health problems, from cancer screening preferences to vaccination. They hope that identifying variations in maximizing or minimizing tendencies may be useful in trying to address both overuse and underuse in health care.

Research Topics: 

CBSSM Seminar: Timothy R. B. Johnson, M.D.

Tue, October 03, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 10, G065

Timothy R. B. Johnson, M.D.
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Bates Professor of the Diseases of Women and Children
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Women’s Studies
Research Professor, CHGD

Title: Global Health Ethics and Reproductive Justice: Breadth and Depth in CBSSM

Global Health Ethics and Reproductive Justice (in this instance sexual rights and gender equity, specifically gender and sexual harassment/assault in Academic Medical Centers) appear to be areas where a number of CBSSM members have interest, expertise and are working inter-disciplinarily in domains that will differentiate CBSSM nationally and internationally. Could and should these develop into CBSSM thematic interests? Whatever the case, they will remain topics of significant interest across CBSSM and are worthy of broad discussion and  understanding.

CBSSM Seminar: Peter Jacobson, J.D., M.P.H.

Tue, October 10, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Peter Jacobson, J.D., M.P.H.
Professor of Health Law and Policy
Director, Center for Law, Ethics, and Health

Title:  Addressing Health Equity Through Health in All Policies Initiatives.

Scholars and public health advocates have expressed optimism about the potential for Health in All Policies (HiAP) initiatives to improve both health equity and population health. HiAP is a collaborative approach across multiple sectors. In a qualitative study to assess these concepts, we found considerable variation across the sites on: how HiAP and equity initiatives are defined and governed; the integration of equity as a core goal; institutional capacity; and the determination of actual policy changes. We found a general migration from a HiAP-centered strategy to one based more on health equity. Regardless of the specific nomenclature, the implementation focus was directed more toward changing practices than policies.

 

Tue, April 10, 2018

In light of the #MeToo campaign denouncing sexual assault and harassment, Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil has written a perspective piece in the New England Journal of Medicine about sexual harrassment in academic medicine. This perspective piece and a recent survey published in JAMA related to sexual harassment and gender bias in academic medicine has been highlighted in multiple media outlets.

Mon, January 05, 2015

Reshma Jagsi was interviewed by mCancerTalk for the article, “Is your course of radiation treatment longer than it needs to be?” which focuses on two of her radiation treatment studies. In one of her studies, looking at a national database of patients, she and her colleagues found that hypofractionated radiation therapy was used in only 13.6% of Medicare patients with breast cancer. In Michigan, Jagsi’s other study found, fewer than one-third of patients who fit the criteria for offering this approach got the shorter course of treatment.

Read Dr. Jagsi’s paper about hypofractionation use nationally and in Michigan.

Fri, May 08, 2015

The vaccine appears to slow spread in those with advanced breast cancer. Sarah Hawley was quoted, "The preliminary finding that the vaccine improved progression-free survival in patients with metastatic cancer [when the disease has spread to other parts of the body] is especially exciting because of the lack of good treatments for metastatic breast cancer... If the authors can replicate this result in future trials in metastatic and non-metastatic or newly diagnosed patients, this will represent an important direction for the field of breast cancer treatment research."

"Still Alice" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Thu, October 15, 2015, 7:00pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Forum Hall, Palmer Commons

"Still Alice" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Free Admission

Moderator:    Raymond De Vries, PhD

Panelists:     Nancy Barbas, MD
                  J. Scott Roberts, PhD

Refreshments provided.

Based on Lisa Genova’s bestselling novel. In an Oscar winning performance, Julianne Moore plays Alice Howland, a renowned neurolinguistics professor at Columbia University who is diagnosed with familial, early onset Alzheimer’s Disease. The film provides insight into the patient’s perspective and the challenges patients, families, and caregivers face. The film also raises important bioethical questions related to patient autonomy, genetic testing, and personhood in the face of dementia.

CBSSM Seminar: Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD

Wed, December 09, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room B004E

Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD


CBSSM Postdoctoral Fellow

From the Guatemala STD Experiments to the NPRM for Revisions to the Common Rule: Why We Still Don’t Have Human Subjects Research Ethics Right

While much has been made of scandals, and academics zealously deliberate nuances, we still find ourselves revisiting the most basic of human subjects research ethics questions: What is a research subject? What is informed consent? This talk will address this ongoing debate but also the less often asked question of why—what are the structural pressures that bring us time and again to step one and is human subjects research ethics a zero sum game?

Wed, September 09, 2015

Raymond De Vries is quoted in a Dutch national newpaper, Volkskrant, regarding a recent AMC Netherlands and University of Amsterdam study comparing infant mortality in mid-wife led versus obstetrician-led care in the Netherlands. Dr. De Vries provides a positive review of the methodology and the colloborative nature of the study (which includes both midwives and obstetricians).

The Volkskrant article is in Dutch, but the study published in the journal "Midwifery" is in English.

Research Topics: 

Pages