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Thu, March 22, 2018

Reshma Jagsi's work related to issues of sexual harassment in academic medicine has been recently highlighted by multiple media outlets.

Research Topics: 

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2011-2016

Disorders of Sex Development are defined as congenital conditions in which development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex is atypical. One of the most defining moments of our lives is when, in the womb, we embark on a male or female path. Disruption of typical male or female development, whether mild or severe, results in DSD, which occur quite frequently, in about 1% of the human population. DSD are extremely stressful for parents and, as they grow older, the affected person and are often accompanied by additional medical and psychological problems; yet little is known about the causes of DSD and what healthcare teams should do in the short and long term. This project proposes to design a way to learn about the genetic causes and the psychological consequences of DSD, and to use these data to provide healthcare teams with procedures to evaluate and improve care for these patients and their families.

PI(s): David Sandberg

Co-I(s):  Eric Vilain, Edward Goldman

People

Our People

CBSSM is an interdisciplinary group committed to improving individual and societal health through research, education, and public outreach. Our unit attracts scholars from across departmental and disciplinary boundaries and in so doing, provides fertile ground for new synergies. CBSSM affiliates with scholars from across the University of Michigan and the Ann Arbor VA Health System to collaborate on research projects.

Our team includes:

  • Social and cognitive psychologists
  • Bioethicists
  • Clinicians from many medical specialty areas
  • Public health researchers
  • Decision scientists
  • Behavioral economists
  • Survey methodologists

Teresa Gavaruzzi, doctoral fellow at CBSSM in 2008 and 2009, has received the Alberto Mazzocco Award from the University of Padua, Italy. She accepted the honor at the September 2009 meeting of the Italian Association of Psychology (Experimental Section). Prof. Mazzocco, in whose memory this award is presented, was a revered scholar in the field of reasoning and decision making at the University of Padua.While at CBSSM, Gavaruzzi worked with mentor Angela Fagerlin, PhD, currently Co-director of CBSSM.

Tue, November 05, 2013

Peter Ubel was published in the New York Times with his op-ed peice, "Doctor, First Tell Me What It Costs," which deals with money and medicine. Dr. Ubel served as the Director of the University of Michigan Center for Behavioral and Decision Sciences in Medicine (CBDSM) from 2005-2010. CBSSM was established in July 2010 through the merger of CBDSM and the Bioethics Program.

On UofMHealthBlogs.org, Christian Vercler discusses the Pediatric Ethics Committee and the work they do.

The Pediatrics Ethics Committee at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital is comprised of representatives from different areas of the hospital as well as members of the community. The committee discusses cases, review policy, and is available for ethics consults.

For full blog: http://uofmhealthblogs.org/childrens/patient-family-services/difficult-medical-decisions/19726/#more-19726

 

CBSSM was again well-represented at the annual American Society for Bioethics & Humanities (ASBH) and the Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) meetings.

At ASBH, Raymond De Vries and Naomi Laventhal presented, and CBSSM alumna, Erica Sutton presented for Michele Gornick.

At SMDM, Angela Fagerlin, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Aaron Scherer, Mas Jimbo, and Darin Zahuranec presented.

 

For more details, please see the ASBH and SMDM websites.

PIHCD: Jacob Solomon and Sameer Saini

Thu, February 25, 2016, 4:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Current guidelines for colorectal cancer screening do not account for several important individual characteristics such as prior screening history and comorbidities, yet these factors can significantly alter the risks and benefits of screening at different ages. Jacob Solomon and Sameer Saini are developing a decision aid and educational tool to help clinicians understand more personalized risks and benefits of screening.

Thu, September 24, 2015

Sarah Hawley, Ph.D., professor of internal medicine, is featured in "Hour Detroit" discussing BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and the subsequent odds of developing breast cancer later in life. For women who test positive for either mutation, the conventional recommendation is to have preventive surgery.

Research Topics: 

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