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Julie Wright Nunes, MD, MPH

Faculty

Julie Wright Nunes is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan Department of Internal Medicine. Her research interests include Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and its prevention and also the development of methods and tools to help facilitate and optimize provider-directed CKD patient education.

Last Name: 
Wright Nunes

Christian Vercler, MD, MA

Faculty

Christian Vercler is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatric Plastic Surgery at the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. He is a service chief of the Clinical Ethics Service in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM). Dr. Vercler has a special interest in ethics in surgery and he holds master's degrees in both Theology and Bioethics. He has a passion for teaching medical students and residents and has won teaching awards from Emory University Medical School, Harvard Medical School, and the University of Michigan.

Last Name: 
Vercler

Scott Kim, MD, PhD

Alumni

Scott Kim, MD, PhD, is a Senior Investigator in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health and Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan. Dr. Kim studies research ethics, especially the ethics of involving decisionally impaired persons in research, the ethics of high-risk research, and methodological issues in empirical bioethics research. He is also interested in the interface of conceptual and empirical methods of bioethics scholarship.  Prior to joining the NIH, Dr.

Last Name: 
Kim

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, is the senior author on a study led by Donna M. Zulman, MD, that reveals about a third of doctors and their patients with diabetes do not agree on which of the patient's health conditions is most important. In the study, 38% of physicians (compared to 18% of patients) ranked hypertension as the most important condition. Patients were more likely to prioritize symptoms such as pain and depression. Read the article, in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, here. Read a press release about the article here.

Thu, August 14, 2014

Tarini and her colleagues studied parent attitudes about using newborn screening samples for research. The research, published in 2009, found that if permission is obtained, 76.2% of parents were ‘very or somewhat willing’ to permit use of the newborn screening sample for research. If permission is not obtained, only 28.2% of parents were ‘very or somewhat willing.’

The CBS story was about a new law that allows Minnesota health officials to indefinitely hold blood samples from newborn babies without parental consent.

Research Topics: 

Blocks, Ovals, or People Icons in Icon Array Risk Graphics? (Sept-15)

Imagine that you are concerned about your risk for heart disease. You look on the Web and find a risk calculator for heart disease.

The calculator asks you some questions about your health and uses your answers to estimate how likely you are to develop certain diseases. The health questions include things like age, gender, weight, height, whether you are a smoker, and whether you have diabetes or high blood pressure.

Imagine that you have answered all the health questions.

Wed, February 01, 2017

Raymond De Vries' commentary, "Giving (Bits of) Your Self to Medicine" was recently published in Medicine at Michigan. He and his colleague, Tom Tomlinson (MSU), published national survey data in JAMA that showed that while most Americans are willing to donate to biobanks, they have serious concerns about how we ask for their consent and about how their donations may be used in future research.

Mon, May 15, 2017

U-M is keeping the dialogue going by offering an online teach-out on the topic of the importance of science and research. "Stand Up for Science: Practical Approaches to Discussing Science That Matters" was recently offered. In this video, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, and Elyse Aurbach, co-founder and co-director of a science communication program called RELATE, explain the importance of science and research. Watch video and read more about the teach-out here.

Research Topics: 

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding years: 2009-2014

The proposed project aims to explore and examine the experiences and preferences regarding communication about positive newborn screening results of key stakeholders (parents, primary care physicians, clinical geneticists, and state newborn screening officials) involved in the three key stages: notification about the initial positive screen; follow-up testing and evaluation; and parental notification of the final results of the evaluation. For more information, visit NIH Reporter.

PI: Beth Tarini

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