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Bioethics Grand Rounds- Janice Firn, PhD & Tom O'Neil, MD

Wed, December 20, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
Univerisity Hospital Ford Auditorium

Professionalism, Ethical Obligations, and the Moral Imperative of Self-Care

Abstract:
Healthcare providers are inevitably called to participate in and bear witness to emotionally challenging cases. Combined with time constraints, competing responsibilities, the urgent nature of these cases, healthcare providers risk burnout.  The consequences of burnout have been shown to be increased staff turnover, substandard patient outcomes and increased likelihood for errors.  As part of competent clinical practice, healthcare providers must not only attend to the needs of the patient and family but also themselves. However, a tension exists between making enough time for patients and taking enough time for oneself. But, engaging in self-care activities can help address clinician distress; this practice is essential for remaining compassionate, providing competent patient care services, and avoiding harm. Healthcare providers, therefore, have an ethical duty to engage in personal self-care.  This presentation makes a case for why self-care is a key component of competent clinical practice.  Several ways in which a lack of self-care can undermine professional competence, thus risking burnout and poor patient outcomes, are discussed. Strategies for recognizing and addressing burnout are also reviewed.

Bioethics Grand Rounds: “Examining the Ethics of Victors Care”

Wed, February 28, 2018, 12:00pm
Location: 
Univerisity Hospital Ford Auditorium

Michigan Medicine has launched Victors Care, a concierge medical care model designed to deliver increased access, convenience and individually-tailored support within a primary care practice for patients who pay for membership. Like all concierge care programs, Victors Care raises ethical issues relating to justice, fairness, access, and consistency with the mission of Michigan Medicine. This Bioethics Grand Rounds will address the ethical issues of concierge care in a panel format with institutional leaders. The panel will address your questions directly. Questions will be solicited during the session, and can be submitted in advance via: https://umichumhs.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_b4nJWM70ahHQtjD.

Panelists
Marschall S. Runge, M.D., Ph.D., EVPMA and Dean
Reshma Jagsi, M.D., D.Phil, Director, Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine
David J. Brown, M.D., Associate Vice President and Associate Dean for Health Equity and Inclusion

Facilitators
Andrew Shuman, M.D., F.A.C.S & Christian J. Vercler, M.D, M.A, F.A.C.S – Service Chiefs, Clinical Ethics Service, Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine

The University of Michigan School of Public Health has received federal funding to launch an integrated, interdisciplinary fellowship program that will provide training in the ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of genomic science.

Led by Scott Roberts, professor of health behavior and health education at Michigan Public Health, the ELSI Research Training Program is funded by a T32 training grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Human Genome Research Institute and will launch in fall 2018. Raymond De Vries, Wendy Uhlmann, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Jodyn Platt, Kayte Spector-Bagdady are among the faculty who will serve as faculty mentors.

More information can be found here.

Research Topics: 

Bioethics Grand Rounds "Clinical Innovations Near the Boundary of Viability- The Artificial Placenta"

Wed, September 26, 2018, 12:00pm
Location: 
Univerisity Hospital Ford Auditorium

Ryan Antiel, MD, MSME, Department of General Surgery, Biomedical Ethics Program, Mayo Clinic

Extreme prematurity is the leading cause of infant death and morbidity.  The urgent need for a better way to support the extremely premature infant led to the development of an extrauterine system to better bridge the transition from fetal to postnatal life.  The goal of this “artificial womb” is to maintain prenatal physiology in the extremely premature neonate to support normal development and reduce the complications associated with prematurity.  In this presentation, we will discuss the development and applications of the artificial womb, as well as the limitations of this technology.  We will focus on three current ethical challenges: ectogenesis, the boundary of viability, and the difference between physiological and clinical success.  
 

Bioethics Grand Rounds -Alexander Langerman, MD

Wed, December 19, 2018, 12:00pm
Add to Calendar
Location: 
Univerisity Hospital Ford Auditorium

"Transparency in Surgery"

 

The operating room shifted over the last century from a historically open "theatre" to a sequestered space, and the proceedings of surgery became a mystery to those outside the surgical profession. The more recent and increasing societal interest in transparency suggests  professions such as surgery must develop new strategies to engender trust and inform the public and patients about what happens behind closed doors. Simultaneously, video and sensor technology has evolved to enable ubiquitous recording and analysis of surgical activities, creating a new source of data and the potential to reinstate a virtual surgical theatre. Such openness of a previously hidden space has implications for patients and surgical teams. This presentation will discuss the important ethical, technological, and regulatory considerations and challenges of a transition to greater transparency in surgery.

 

 

CBSSM Seminar: Darin Zahuranec, MD

Wed, January 20, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Darin Zahuranec, MD


Assistant Professor, Neurology

Title:  Improving decisions on life-sustaining treatments after stroke

Abstract:  Individuals with acute stroke face the sudden onset of new deficits, along with a need to make many decisions about medical treatments with impact on the potential for survival and long-term disability. This talk will review the challenges in decision-making after acute stroke and discuss possible solutions for the future.

 

CBSSM Seminar: Aaron Scherer, PhD

Wed, February 03, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Aaron Scherer, PhD


CBSSM Postdoctoral Fellow

The Language of Medicine

Is the way we talk about health and medicine simply expressive or does the language we use actually change how we perceive and respond to health risks and medical interventions? Aaron Scherer will discuss a number of studies that explore how metaphors, labels, and explanations may shape our health-related perceptions and behavior.

PIHCD: Jacob Solomon and Sameer Saini

Thu, February 25, 2016, 4:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Current guidelines for colorectal cancer screening do not account for several important individual characteristics such as prior screening history and comorbidities, yet these factors can significantly alter the risks and benefits of screening at different ages. Jacob Solomon and Sameer Saini are developing a decision aid and educational tool to help clinicians understand more personalized risks and benefits of screening.

CBSSM Seminar: Christian Vercler, MD

Thu, February 25, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Christian Vercler, MD

Clinical Assistant Professor, Plastic Surgery
Co-Chair, Pediatric Ethics Committee, C.S. Mott Children's Hospital
Co-Chair, Adult Ethics Committee, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems
Co-Director, Clinical Ethics Program, CBSSM (RESCHEDULED)

 

CBSSM Seminar: Jeffrey Bishop, MD, PhD

Wed, March 30, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Jeffrey P. Bishop, MD, PhD
Director, Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics
Tenet Chair of Health Care Ethics

Seminar: Popular (Neuro)Science and Other Political Schemes.
Neuroscience is a hybrid science in that it attempts to bring together two distinct sciences--neurobiology and social science. This talk will explore the way in which certain political ideas regnant in social science get mapped onto the brain.

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