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CBSSM Seminar: Jason Rose, PhD (Toledo)

Wed, March 09, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Jason Rose, PhD
Associate Professor
University of Toledo

Title: “Decisions, Decisions: The Impact of Treatment Choice on Health-Related Outcomes”

Abstract: From selecting a health care provider to choosing among an array of over-the-counter treatment options, choice has become a ubiquitous element of health care. Using an experimental, lab-based approach, the current research examines how, why, and when treatment choice impacts health-related outcomes (e.g., pain, discomfort).

 

Thu, March 03, 2016

In an interview with MedicalResearch.com, Dr. Sarah Hawley discusses her new study regarding breast cancer patients' understanding of risk. She states, "Research has shown that breast cancer patients do not have a good understanding of their risk of distant recurrence, and and that the fear of cancer spreading is one of the biggest concerns that patients have. The research that has been done shows that most patients over-esimate this risk, and think they have a bigger chance of the cancer coming back than they actually have."

CBSSM Seminar: Michael D. Fetters, MD, MPH, MA

Thu, April 14, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 16, Conference Rm 266C

Michael D. Fetters, M.D., M.P.H., M.A.
Professor, University of Michigan
Co-Director, Michigan Mixed Methods Research and Scholarship Program
Director, Japanese Family Health Program
Co-Editor, Journal of Mixed Methods Research

"Mixed methods research approaches for empirical medical ethics”

Abstract: Mixed methods research involves the integration of qualitative and quantitative methodology. The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate potential applications of mixed methods methodology for conducting empirical medical ethics research.

Emily Chen, MA

Research Associate

Emily Chen joined CBSSM in February 2016 and works with Drs. Julie Wright and Darin Zahuranec on several grant funded research projects on developing decision aids and family perspectives in decision making. Prior to moving to Michigan, Emily worked on several studies regarding mindfulness and cognitive styles at Harvard University. Emily received her BS in Atmospheric Science and a certificate in Neurobiology and Cognitive Science from National Taiwan University. She went on to receive her MA in Psychology from Boston University.

Last Name: 
Chen

CBSSM Seminar: Reshma Jagsi, MD, PhD

Wed, May 18, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Reshma Jagsi, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology

"Stewardship and Value:  Are we choosing wisely in managing breast cancer?"

Abstract: This lecture will begin with a brief discussion of the moral foundations of physicians' obligations to serve society, in addition to the patients they directly serve.  It will then consider analogies between financial stewardship and antibiotic stewardship, and it will conclude by focusing on several examples of opportunities for better physician stewardship in breast cancer, including slow uptake of short courses of breast radiation and rapid increases in the use of bilateral mastectomy for unilateral disease.

CBSSM Seminar: Stephen Molldrem, PhD Candidate

Thu, July 07, 2016, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 16, Conference Rm 266C

Stephen Molldrem, PhD Candidate, American Culture

Title: Collecting and Managing Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data in Health Contexts: Bioethical Dilemmas from a Queer Historical Perspective

Abstract: This talk, drawn from dissertation research, historicizes a number of regulatory changes governing the collection and management of sexual orientation and gender identity data in health contexts in the United States that have taken place since 2009. It focuses on a range of less-considered bioethical dilemmas that stem from the introduction of questions about sexual orientation and gender identity into the battery of demographic information collected in certified Electronic Health Record technologies.

Suzanne Young, who is the granddaughter of Ronald and Nancy Bishop, was recently featured on the American Society for Microbiology podcast "This Week in Microbiology" (TWiM #135 ~ min 50:28).  Suzanne Young is a doctoral student at the University of South Florida and was the lead author of a research article looking at the release of antibiotic-resistant bacteria following a sewage spill in Florida.

In addition to a discussion of Ms. Young's great research, her Ann Arbor roots, including her grandparents' social activism and the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics are also mentioned.

 

 

CBSSM-affiliated faculty and staff recently presented at the Western Michigan University Ethics Center's Conference on Preparing for the Unknown. One of our post-doctoral research fellows, Kayte Spector-Bagdady presented, “The Google of Personalized Healthcare: 23andMe and Enabling the Privatization of Genetic Biobanking”. In addition, Lan Le, Nicole Exe, Natalie Bartnik and Michele Gornick presented a panel on “Examining the Psychosocial and Ethical Issues Arising from the Identification, Disclosure and Communication of Genomic Results to Patients and Clinicians.” This panel was moderated by our co-director, Raymond De Vries.

CBSSM Seminar: Susan Goold & Zachary Rowe (DECIDERS Project)

Thu, December 15, 2016, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA
Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School
Professor of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health

Zachary Rowe
Executive Director of Friends of Parkside (FOP)

Title:  Evaluation of CHAT as a tool for engaging communities in priority setting

Abstract:  Engaging minority and underserved communities in setting research priorities could make the scientific research agenda more equitable and more responsive to their needs.  This presentation evaluates CHAT, a serious game, to prioritize health research based on feedback from 47 focus groups (N=519) across Michigan.

Thu, July 21, 2016

Due to food safety concerns, the FDA recently released a statement that strongly advises the public from indulging in raw cookie dough. In Brian Zikmund-Fisher response to the FDA's warning in The Conversation, he discusses balancing the minimization of risk with the maximization of life: "...let’s all please remind ourselves that our goal is not to minimize all risk, no matter the cost. Our goal is to maximize life. Sometimes maximizing life means warning people that their flour is contaminated and making sure they throw it out. Sometimes maximizing life means letting them enjoy some (carefully prepared) cookie dough without shame."

Research Topics: 

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