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Beth Tarini is the senior author of a study in Public Health Genomics that found that more than half of parents want to know disease risks for selves & kids. In addition, 85% of parents had identical interest in finding out this information for themselves and their children. Read more.

Tanner Caverly, MD, MPH

Faculty

Tanner Caverly has been a general internist and Health Services Research Fellow at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center and a Clinical Lecturer at the University of Michigan Medical School since July 2013. He graduated from medical school at The Ohio State University School of Medicine and Public Health, and subsequently traveled to the University of Colorado, where he completed internal medicine residency training, a year as Chief Medical Resident, and a Primary Care Research Fellowship / Masters in Public Health.

Last Name: 
Caverly

Kerry Ryan, MA

Research Associate

Kerry Ryan joined CBSSM in July 2010. Kerry has a BA in History (Kalamazoo College) and MA in Sociology (University of Michigan). Before joining CBSSM, Kerry worked as a research assistant and an academic advisor. She has been involved with research related to the effects of community violence and prenatal cocaine exposure; college student academic success and retention; at-risk women’s child-bearing decisions in the context of genetic testing and discrimination; surrogate consent for research; and therapeutic misconception. She currently works with Dr. Raymond De Vries and Dr.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Ryan

Journeys in Genetics: Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications

Tue, September 27, 2016, 3:00pm
Location: 
2610 SPH I

Journeys in Genetics: Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications
with Toby Citrin, J.D. and Scott Roberts, Ph.D.


September 27, 2016
3:00 - 4:00 p.m.
2610 SPH I
1415 Washington Heights
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029


Sponsored by Certificate Program in Public Health Genetics 20th Anniversary Seminar Series


"Journeys in Genetics" is an interactive series of seminars that will highlight the unique personal and professional paths that the Certificate Program in Public Health Genetics (CPHG) faculty members have traversed throughout their careers in the field of public health genetics. In this seminar, Professor Citrin will describe a phone call from Detroit's Mayor in 1970, a request from Francis Collins in the early '90s, creation of the Center for Public Health and Community Genomics in 2001, and projects engaging minority communities in learning about genetics and helping to shape policies to guide the field. Professor Roberts will discuss his research program on how individuals appraise and respond to personal genetic information in contexts including genetic susceptibility testing for Alzheimer's disease, cancer genomics, and direct-to-consumer genetic testing.

PIHCD: Kerry Ryan

Thu, September 22, 2016, 4:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16
Kerry Ryan will be doing a practice talk for an American Society for Bioethics & Humanities (ASBH) presentation, entitled “Effect Of Public Deliberation On Attitudes Toward Donating To Biobank Research And Biobank Consent Policies.”

2015 CBSSM Research Colloquium and Bishop Lecture (Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D., LL.D Hon.)

Tue, March 17, 2015, 8:30am to 4:00pm
Location: 
Alumni Center, 200 Fletcher St., Ann Arbor, MI

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) Research Colloquium was held Tuesday, March 17, 2015 at the Founders Room, Alumni Center, 200 Fletcher St., Ann Arbor, MI.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium featured the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D., LL.D (Hon.) presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: "Law, Ethics, and Public Health in the Vaccination Debates: Politics of the Measles Outbreak."

Lawrence Gostin is University Professor, Georgetown University’s highest academic rank conferred by the University President. Prof. Gostin directs the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law and is the Founding O’Neill Chair in Global Health Law. He is Professor of Medicine at Georgetown University, Professor of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University, and Director of the Center for Law & the Public’s Health at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities. Prof. Gostin is also the Director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Public Health Law & Human Rights.

The 2015 Research Colloquium Presentation Schedule:

  • 8:30 AM -- Check in & refreshments
  • 9:00 AM -- Welcome
  • 9:15 AM -- Aaron Scherer, PhD, CBSSM Postdoctoral Fellow: "Elephants, Donkeys, and Medicine: Political Differences in Health Risk Perceptions and Adherence to Medical Recommendations"
  • 9:45 AM -- Natalie Bartnik, MPH, Research Associate, HBHE Genetics Research Group, UM School of Public Health: "Why, how and when oncologists disclose genome sequencing results in clinical practice"
  • 10:15 AM -- Michele Gornick, PhD, MICHR PTSP Postdoctoral Fellow, VA HSRD Fellow & CBSSM Research Investigator: "Information and deliberation make a difference: The public’s preferences for the return of secondary genomic findings"
  • 10:45 AM -- Break
  • 11:00 AM -- Lawrence O. Gostin, JD, LLD (Hon.), 2015 Bishop Lecture in Bioethics: "Law, Ethics, and Public Health in the Vaccination Debates: Politics of the Measles Outbreak"
  • 12:30 PM -- Lunch
  • 1:30 PM -- Stephanie Kukora, MD and Nathan Gollehon, MD, Fellows, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, UM Mott Children’s Hospital: "Epidemiology of outpatient prenatal consultation: implications for decision-making and perinatal outcomes"
  • 2:00 PM -- Minnie Bluhm, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor, School of Health Sciences, Eastern Michigan University: "Oncologists' decisions about administering late chemotherapy: What makes it so difficult?"
  • 2:30 PM -- Break
  • 2:45 PM -- Danielle Czarnecki, PhD Candidate, UM Department of Sociology: "Moral Women, Immoral Technologies: How Devout Women Negotiate Maternal Desires, Religion, and Assisted Reproductive Technologies"
  • 3:15 PM -- Uchenna Ezeibe, MD, Resident Physician, UMHS Department of Pediatrics & Communicable Diseases: "Pediatric Ethics Consultation Service at a Tertiary Hospital: A Retrospective Review"

2015 Bishop Lecture featuring Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D., LL.D. (Hon.)

Tue, March 17, 2015, 11:00am
Location: 
Founders Room, Alumni Center, 200 Fletcher St., Ann Arbor, MI

Bishop Lecture in Bioethics: "Law, Ethics, and Public Health in the Vaccination Debates: Politics of the Measles Outbreak" (Keynote Address for the 2015 CBSSM Research Colloquium)

Abstract: The measles outbreak of early 2015 is symptomatic of a larger societal problem–the growing number of parents who decide against vaccinating their children. This failure is causing the resurgence of childhood diseases once eliminated from the United States.
falseThis presentation explores the legal and ethical landscape of vaccine exemptions. While all states require childhood vaccinations, they differ significantly in the types of religious and/or philosophical exemptions permitted, the rigor of the application process, and available review mechanisms. States with relaxed exemption policies disproportionately experience more outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease.

Vaccine exemptions are an illustration of the “tragedy of the commons,” in which parents choose not to vaccinate their children, relying on the fact that other parents will vaccinate their children, thus providing community immunity. However, the net result of many individual decisions not to vaccinate is the collapse of herd immunity and thus an upsurge in preventable disease and death.
The failure to vaccinate puts others at risk, thus violating an important ethical principle. However, punishing individual parents could entrench political opposition to vaccine policy. The most ethical and effective solution is for state legislatures to tighten vaccination laws, making it more difficult to obtain non-medical exemptions.

Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D., LL.D. (Hon.) is University Professor, Georgetown University’s highest academic rank conferred by the University President. Prof. Gostin directs the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law and is the Founding O’Neill Chair in Global Health Law. He is Professor of Medicine at Georgetown University, Professor of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University, and Director of the Center for Law & the Public’s Health at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities. Prof. Gostin is also the Director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Public Health Law & Human Rights.

  • Click here for video-recording of the 2015 Bishop Lecture

On Thursday, March 22,3:30-4:45, at the School of Public Health (SPH I, Rm 1655), we are pleased to announce that Amy McGuire, JD, PhD, of Baylor College of Medicine will give a talk entitled, “Biobanking and Genomic Research: Ethical Challenges and Policy Implications." Dr. McGuire is Associate Professor of Medicine andMedical Ethics and Associate Director of Research at the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine.  Her research focuses on legal and ethical issues in genomics.  She is currently studying participant attitudes toward genomic data sharing, investigators' practices and perspectives on the return of genetic research results, ethical issues in human microbiome research, and ethical and policy issues related to theclinical integration of genomics.  Her research is funded by the NIH-NHGRI and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.  The talk is co-sponsored by the School of Public Health and will be followed by a reception.

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