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Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD, MBioethics

Faculty

Kayte Spector-Bagdady is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Michigan Medical School and is also the Chief of the Research Ethics Service in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM). At UM she also serves as Chair of the Research Ethics Committee, a clinical ethicist through CBSSM’s Clinical Ethics Service, and a member of IRB Council.

Last Name: 
Spector-Bagdady

Lewis Morgenstern, MD

Sarah Hawley, PhD, MPH

Faculty

Dr. Sarah T. Hawley is a Professor in the Division of General Medicine at the University of Michigan and a Research Investigator at the Ann Arbor VA Center of Excellence in Health Services Research & Development. She holds a PhD in health services research from the University of North Carolina and an MPH from Yale University Department of Public Health. Her primary research is in decision making related to cancer prevention and control, particularly among racial/ethnic minority and underserved populations.

Last Name: 
Hawley
Press Coverage: 

Raymond G. De Vries, Ph.D., gave a talk at North Park University, Chicago, IL, in March 2011.

Dr. Brian Zikmund-Fisher is an occasional contributor to U-M's Risk Science Center blog.  Click here to read his latest posting and to view other contributions.

Raymond De Vries and Tim Johnson served as judges in the 2018 Michigan High School Ethics Bowl. Thank you for representing CBSSM in this great event! For more information about the Michigan High School Ethics Bowl and other local ethics-related events, check out https://www.a2ethics.org/

CBSSM affiliates will be presenting at the WMU Ethics Center Conference: "Bioethics: Preparing for the Unknown" (March 17-18th).

CBSSM Postdoc Kayte Spector-Bagdady: “The Google of Personalized Healthcare: 23andMe and Enabling the Privatization of Genetic Biobanking"

Lan Le, Natalie Bartnik, Michele C. Gornick and Nicole Exe: “Examining the Psychosocial and Ethical Issues Arising from the Identification, Disclosure and Communication of Genomic Results to Patients and Clinicians,” Chair: Raymond De Vries

Other presentations with CBSSM/UM bioethics connections include:

"Patient Understanding and Satisfaction Regarding the Clinical Use of Whole
Genome Sequencing: Findings from the MedSeq Project," Archana Bharadwaj, School of Public Health

"The Voice is As Mighty as the Pen: Integrating Conversations Into Advance Care
Planning Policies," Kunal Bailoor, UM Medical School

Here is the link to the the program: http://www.mywmu.com/s/1428/images/gid2/editor_documents/events/prelimin...

Here is the link to register: http://www.mywmu.com/s/1428/gid2/index.aspx?sid=1428&gid=2&pgid=2900&con...

CBSSM Seminar: Cheryl A. Moyer, MPH, PhD

Thu, November 03, 2016, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Cheryl A. Moyer, MPH, PhD
Assistant Professor, Learning Health Sciences
Assistant Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Using GIS and Social Autopsy to understand where and why mothers and babies are dying in rural northern Ghana

Abstract: Cheryl Moyer, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Learning Health Sciences and Obstetrics & Gynecology, will describe a 3-year, USAID-funded project that involves identifying all maternal and neonatal deaths and ‘near-misses’ (those who survive a life-threatening event) across four districts in northern Ghana and conducting detailed verbal and social autopsies to determine both the biomedical cause of death and the sociocultural contributors. The project, known as PREMAND (PREventing Maternal And Neonatal Deaths), also involves geocoding the location of births, deaths, health facilities, traditional healer compounds, and other important landmarks to explore the role of geography in influencing outcomes.

Thu, October 29, 2015

Jeremy Sussman has received much press for a recent study in JAMA about rates of treatment deintensification in diabetes. Dr. Sussman is first author of a study that found that among older diabetes patients whose treatment resulted in very low blood pressure, only a minority (27% or fewer) underwent treatment deintensification for diabetes, which represents a lost opportunity to reduce overtreatment. The study suggests practice guidelines and performance measures should place more focus on reducing overtreatment through deintensification.

Tanner Caverly and other CBSSM faculty co-authored a national survey study in JAMA examining VA primary care health-care professionals' beliefs regarding prescribing for older diabetics. This study found misperceptions about the benefits of stringent blood glucose control and concerns about negative repercussions following deintensification of therapy. This study is also being cited in a number of press articles.

Original studies:

Sussman, Jeremy B., Eve A. Kerr, Sameer D. Saini, Rob G. Holleman, Mandi L. Klamerus, Lillian C. Min, Sandeep Vijan, and Timothy P. Hofer. "Rates of Deintensification of Blood Pressure and Glycemic Medication Treatment Based on Levels of Control and Life Expectancy in Older Patients With Diabetes Mellitus." JAMA Internal Medicine (2015): 1-8.

Caverly, Tanner J., Angela Fagerlin, Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, Susan Kirsh, Jeffrey Todd Kullgren, Katherine Prenovost, and Eve A. Kerr. "Appropriate Prescribing for Patients With Diabetes at High Risk for Hypoglycemia: National Survey of Veterans Affairs Health Care Professionals." JAMA internal medicine (2015): 1-3.

Sat, April 14, 2018

Jeff Kullgren was recently quoted in the article, "Uninsured struggle to obtain, afford doctor appointments." Dr. Kullgren commented, ""Even though the ACA has led to improvements, there is still a substantial (number) of individuals who don't have health insurance...And even for people who are insured, deductibles have climbed dramatically in recent years."

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