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Ken Langa, MD, PhD

Faculty

Dr. Langa is the Cyrus Sturgis Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine and Institute for Social Research, a Research Scientist in the Veterans Affairs Center for Clinical Management Research, and an Associate Director of the Institute of Gerontology, all at the University of Michigan. He is also Associate Director of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a National Institute on Aging funded longitudinal study of 20,000 adults in the United States ( http://hrsonline.isr.umich.edu ).

Last Name: 
Langa
Thu, October 29, 2015

Jeremy Sussman has received much press for a recent study in JAMA about rates of treatment deintensification in diabetes. Dr. Sussman is first author of a study that found that among older diabetes patients whose treatment resulted in very low blood pressure, only a minority (27% or fewer) underwent treatment deintensification for diabetes, which represents a lost opportunity to reduce overtreatment. The study suggests practice guidelines and performance measures should place more focus on reducing overtreatment through deintensification.

Tanner Caverly and other CBSSM faculty co-authored a national survey study in JAMA examining VA primary care health-care professionals' beliefs regarding prescribing for older diabetics. This study found misperceptions about the benefits of stringent blood glucose control and concerns about negative repercussions following deintensification of therapy. This study is also being cited in a number of press articles.

Original studies:

Sussman, Jeremy B., Eve A. Kerr, Sameer D. Saini, Rob G. Holleman, Mandi L. Klamerus, Lillian C. Min, Sandeep Vijan, and Timothy P. Hofer. "Rates of Deintensification of Blood Pressure and Glycemic Medication Treatment Based on Levels of Control and Life Expectancy in Older Patients With Diabetes Mellitus." JAMA Internal Medicine (2015): 1-8.

Caverly, Tanner J., Angela Fagerlin, Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, Susan Kirsh, Jeffrey Todd Kullgren, Katherine Prenovost, and Eve A. Kerr. "Appropriate Prescribing for Patients With Diabetes at High Risk for Hypoglycemia: National Survey of Veterans Affairs Health Care Professionals." JAMA internal medicine (2015): 1-3.

CBSSM's Elias Baumgarten, Raymond De Vries, Kayte Spector-Bagdady, Michele Gornick, & Adam Marks (no pictured) were judges at the 2017 A2Ethics High School Ethics Bowl January 28-29th. Click here for more details about this event.


Research Topics: 

Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA

Faculty

Susan Dorr Goold, M.D., M.H.S.A., M.A., studies the allocation of scarce healthcare resources, especially the perspectives of patients and the public. Results from projects using the CHAT (Choosing Healthplans All Together) allocation game have been published and presented in national and international venues. CHAT won the 2003 Paul Ellwood Award and Dr. Goold is listed in the Foundation for Accountability's database of Innovators and Visionaries. Dr.

Last Name: 
Goold

CBSSM Seminar: Rana Awdish, MD

Thu, February 15, 2018, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Dr. Rana Awdish is the author of In Shock, a memoir based on her own critical illness. She is also Director of the Pulmonary Hypertension Program at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit and a practicing Critical Care Physician. She lectures to physicians, health care leaders and medical schools across the country on the necessity of compassionate care. She was recently named Medical Director of Care Experience for the Health System.

In Shock will describe Dr. Awdish's personal transformation from critical care physician to critically ill patient and describe how the events surrounding her near death changed her understanding of the culture of medicine and lead her to alter the course of her institution. Focusing on Physician communication training, narrative medicine and visual thinking strategies, and a culture of caring, she will illuminate the path towards creating a more resilient culture for everyone involved in health care.

 Objectives:

1. Describe the ecosystem of medical training and practice and the way it compromises empathy and compassion.

2. Illustrate how medical humanities and a purpose driven culture can be used to promote a culture of resilience.

3. Recognize the barriers to implementing institutional change and empowering individuals.

4. Identify practices that will engage providers and leaders in promoting development of resilient systems.

Rana Awdish, MD
Director, Pulmonary Hypertension Program, Henry Ford Hospital, and Medical Director, Care Experience, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI

Dr. Rana Awdish is the Director of the Pulmonary Hypertension Program at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit and a Critical Care Physician. She also serves as Medical Director of Care Experience for the Henry Ford Health System. Dr. Awdish’s mandate as well as her passion is to improve the patient experience across the system. 

After suffering a sudden critical illness herself in 2008, she has become a tireless activist, refocusing her fellow providers on the patient experience and improving empathy through connection and communication. She lectures to physicians, hospital leadership and medical schools around the country. Her book, In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope, has been featured in the Washington Post, NPR, The Today Show, The Times Literary Supplement, and is now an LA Times Bestseller.

Dr. Awdish received the Schwartz Center’s National Compassionate Caregiver of the Year Award in 2017. She was named Physician of the Year by Press Ganey in 2017 for her work on improving communication, and received the Critical Care Teaching Award in 2016. She, along with three others, began the CLEAR Conversations Project at Henry Ford, using improvisational actors to train physicians in patient-centered empathic communication. 

Prior to coming to Henry Ford, Dr. Awdish completed her training at Mount Sinai Beth Israel in Manhattan. She attended Wayne State University Medical School, and completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. She is board-certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine.

Tanner Caverly, MD, MPH

Faculty

Tanner Caverly has been a general internist and Health Services Research Fellow at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center and a Clinical Lecturer at the University of Michigan Medical School since July 2013. He graduated from medical school at The Ohio State University School of Medicine and Public Health, and subsequently traveled to the University of Colorado, where he completed internal medicine residency training, a year as Chief Medical Resident, and a Primary Care Research Fellowship / Masters in Public Health.

Last Name: 
Caverly

Conference on Bioethics: First Do No Harm: Avoiding Overdiagnosis and Overtreatment in Medicine

Sat, November 11, 2017, 8:45am
Location: 
Sheraton Ann Arbor Hotel | 3200 Boardwalk Street | Ann Arbor, MI

Registration available here.
 
8:45 am
Welcome, Opening Remarks, and Presentation of Certification of Appreciation Award to Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation
Lauren B. Smith, MD, Chair, MSMS Committee on Bioethics; Department of Pathology, University of Michigan
Audrey J. Harvey, CEO, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation; and,
Shauna Ryder-Diggs, MD, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation
 
9:00 - 10:00 am
7 Assumptions that Drive Too Much Medical Care
H. Gilbert Welch, MD, MPH, Professor of Medicine, Community & Family Medicine, The Dartmouth Institute, The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Adjunct Professor, Business Administration, Tuck School
of Business and Adjunct Professor, Public Policy, Dartmouth College
 
10:00 - 11:00 am
Responding to those who Hope for a Miracle
Devan Stahl, PhD, Assistant Professor, Center for Ethics & Humanities in the Life Sciences, Department of Pediatrics & Human Development, Michigan State University
 
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Whose Decision is it Anyway? Code Status and the Unilateral DNAR
Adam Marks, MD, Associate Director of the Adult Palliative and Supportive Care Clinic, East Ann Arbor Health and Geriatrics Center, Adult Palliative Care Medical Director, Arbor Hospice
 
1:15 - 2:15 pm
Capacity for Preferences: An Overlooked Factor in Ethical Dilemmas with Incapacitated Patients
Jason A. Wasserman, PhD, Associate Professor, Biomedical Science, Faculty Advisor on Professionalism, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine; and,
Mark C. Navin, PhD, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
 
2:15 - 3:15 pm
Over-treatment/Over-diagnosis of Genetic Testing
Michele Gornick, PhD, MA, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School
 
3:30 - 4:30 pm
Case Studies
 
4:30 pm
Closing Remarks
Lauren B. Smith, MD, University of Michigan

Tue, January 10, 2017

Geoffrey Barnes was featured in a recent MHealth Lab article, "Medication Adherence a Problem in Atrial Fibrillation Patients." Dr. Barnes is the lead author of JAMA Cardiology article, which reports that while anticoagulant therapy is important for stroke prevention in people with atrial fibrillation, many people don’t stick with it for various reasons (side effects, physician advice, etc.).

Jeremy Sussman, MD, MS

Faculty

Dr. Sussman is a Research Scientist in the Center for Clinical Management Research at the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Health System and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School. He attended medical school at the University of California, San Francisco, completed internal medicine residency at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar at the University of Michigan.

Last Name: 
Sussman

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