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Julie Wright-Nunes and Pandu Rao are collaborating with Project Healthy Schools (PHS) to raise awareness about kidney disease prevention, especially among students in Detroit, a high-risk area for chronic kidney disease and morbidity.

More can be found here.

Tanner Caverly recently received a VA HSR&D Career Development Award. Dr. Caverly's award will focus on how to deliver a personalized approach to lung cancer screening that ensures clinical decisions are Veteran-centered and easy to carry out in busy primary care settings.

Give me colostomy or give me death! (Aug-06)

Click to decide between death and living with a colostomy. Which would you choose? Are you sure?

Given the choice, would you choose immediate death,or living with a colostomy (where part of your bowel is removed and you have bowel movements into a plastic pouch attached to your belly)?

  •  Immediate Death
  •  Colostomy

Think about what it would be like if you were diagnosed with colon cancer. You are given the option of choosing between two surgical treatments.The first is a surgery that could result in serious complications and the second has no chance of complications but has a higher mortality rate.

Possible outcome Surgery 1
(complicated)
Surgery 2 
(uncomplicated)
Cure without complication 80% 80%
Cure with colostomy 1%  
Cure with chronic diarrhea 1%  
Cure with intermittent bowel obstruction 1%  
Cure with wound infection 1%  
No cure (death) 16% 20%

If you had the type of colon cancer described above, which surgery do you think you would choose?

  • Surgery 1
  • Surgery 2

How do your answers compare?

In fact, past research has shown that 51% people choose the surgery with a higher death rate, even though most of them initially preferred each of the four surgical complications, including colostomy, over immediate death.

Are you saying what you really mean?

CBDSM investigators Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Angela Fagerlin, Peter Ubel, teamed up with Jennifer Amsterlaw, to see if they could reduce the number of people choosing the surgery with the higher rate of death and therefore reducing the discrepancy. A large body of past research has shown that people are notoriously averse to uncertainty. The investigators had a hunch that uncertainty could account for some of the discrepancy. Surgery 1 has a greater number of ambiguous outcomes, perhaps causing people to be averse to it. In an effort to minimize this uncertainty, the investigators laid out a series of scenarios outlining different circumstances and presentations of the two surgeries. For example the research presented some of the participants with a reframing of the surgery information, such as:

Possible outcome Surgery 1
(complicated)
Surgery 2 
(uncomplicated)
Cured without complication 80% 80%
Cured, but with one of the following complications: colostomy, chronic diarrhea, intermittent bowl obstruction, or wound infection 4%  
No cure (death) 16% 20%

The investigators believed by grouping all of the complications together that people would be more apt to chose the surgery with the lower mortality rate, because seeing a single group of undesirable outcomes, versus a list, may decrease some of the ambiguity from previous research.

Although none of the manipulations significantly reduced the percentage of participants selecting Surgery 2, the versions that yielded the lowest preference for this surgery all grouped the risk of the four possible complications into a single category, as in the example shown above.

Why these findings are important

Over the past several decades there has been a push to give patients more information so they can make decisions that are consistent with their personal preferences. On the other hand there is a growing psychological literature revealing people's tendency to make choices that are in fact inconsistent with their own preferences; this is a dilemma. Because the present research suggests that the discrepancy between value and surgery choice is extremely resilient, much research still needs to be done in order to understand what underlies the discrepancy, with the goal of eliminating it.

The research reported in this decision of the month is currently in press. Please come back to this page in the near future for a link to the article.

Read the article:

Can avoidance of complications lead to biased healthcare decisions?
Amsterlaw J, Zikmund-Fisher BJ, Fagerlin A, Ubel PA. Judgment and Decision Making 2006;1(1):64-75.

 

 

 

We are announcing available positions for faculty ethicists in our Clinical Ethics Service. This service is hosted by CBSSM and provides the resources to expand and improve existing clinical ethics services across the institution.

Andrew Shuman, MD and Christian Vercler, MD are the Co-Directors/Leads of the Clinical Ethcs Service.

The detailed descriptions of the open positions can be found below. Application submission deadline is September 25, 2017, with a starting date of January 1, 2018.

Faculty Ethicist Positions

 

 

 

 

CBSSM Working Group Meeting-Tanner Caverly, MD

Tue, March 06, 2018, 4:00pm
Add to Calendar
Location: 
NCRC bldg 16 266C

Tanner is seeking feedback on patient vignettes designed to be realistic and vivid, to help us test how different types of vignettes (activated patient vs.not; complex patient vs. not) influence the way oncologists, nurses, and other cancer care team providers use a new web-application we are developing called the “Patient data dashboard.” This dashboard aims to integrate different health technologies to improve the patient experience of cancer care.

Thu, April 04, 2013

Babies cry and spit up … and too often those common symptoms are labeled as disease, according to a new study conducted by U-M researchers. Frequent use of the GERD label can lead to overuse of medication. The study was published online today in the journal Pediatrics.

Stories have already been published by Reuters,  Yahoo News!MedPage TodayNPRMSN Healthy Living,  CBS News, and the Chicago Tribune, among others. Laura Scherer, PHD, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, Angela Fagerlin, PhD and Beth Tarini, MD are authors on this study.

Mon, June 23, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was interviewed by Reuters Health for the article "Shared decision making still lacking for cancer screening." He discusses his research and trade-offs in cancer screenings. "What this study does is it shows that despite all of the initiatives and the discussion of shared decision making that has been going on, we don't seem to be moving the needle very much," he states. 

His interview also received press in the Chicago Tribune and New York Daily News.

Fri, March 12, 2010

Peter Ubel, MD, spoke recently at the DeVos Medical Ethics Colloquy at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Dr. Ubel's presentation, "Rationing vs. Rationalizing Health Care," was covered by news outlets in western Michigan. To see a clip from television reports, go to http://www.peterubel.com.

Tue, October 31, 2017

In a recent US Department of Health and Human Services symposium, Kayte Spector-Bagdady discussed the need for consistent informed consent and disclosure regulations for biospecimens and health data.

Darin Zahuranec, MD

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