Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query news events news 2017 12 11.

Page not found

You are here

Mon, July 31, 2017

David Sandberg was recently quoted in BuzzFeed article, "A Landmark Lawsuit About An Intersex Baby’s Genital Surgery Just Settled For $440,000." Dr. Sandberg is the coinvestigator of a research initiative across several hospitals to try to better understand outcomes of patients with differences of sexual development.

Thu, September 28, 2017

Geoff Barnes was recently interviewed for the article, "Stroke, Bleeding Risks High in A-fib Patients With Contraindications to Anticoagulation" in tctMD/the heart beat.

Fri, November 17, 2017

Naomi Laventhal and Kayte Spector-Bagdady were quoted in Michigan Medicine for the article, "Born at the Right Time" about an artificial placenta being developed at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital for the treatment of extreme prematurity.

Samantha Harrison, MPH

Research Associate

Sam joined CBSSM in November 2017. She works with Drs. Julie Wright, Michele Gornick, and Renuka Tipirneni on projects examining provider-patient communication regarding chronic kidney disease, VA data sharing, and the effect of Medicaid expansion on healthcare for low-SES aging adults.

Last Name: 
Harrison

Joel Howell was honored by the American College of Physicians (ACP) at its annual convocation ceremony in April. Howell was named a new Master of the American College of Physicians for 2017-2018. Each year, a select group of these Fellows are chosen from among the nominees for Mastership by the ACP Awards Committee and approved by the ACP Board of Regents.

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, June 27, 2018, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Auditorium

Title: Use of Preventive Ethics Rounds to Identify, Anticipate, and Proactively Address Ethical Dilemmas

Presenters: Janice Firn, PhD, LMSW,  Katie Feder, M2, Sally Salari, M4

The intersection of complex, critical illness and evolving medical technology in hospital intensive care units (ICUs) drives ethical dilemmas which in turn affect patient care and contribute to moral distress and burnout in providers. Rounding regularly in ICUs allows clinical ethicists to proactively intervene in ethically challenging cases at a time when they are most amenable to intervention. Through case discussion, clinical ethicists can help educate and support critical care providers in thinking through ethical issues pertinent to patient care throughout the hospital course. This approach can be helpful in offering a common language and framework for addressing ethical issues in every day clinical practice. To provide real-time education in the clinical context and early identification of ethical issues, Michigan Medicine initiated novel, system-wide “preventive ethics rounds” in all the ICUs (medical and surgical, adult and pediatric) in the form of a pre-consult rounding service. Providers use ethics related tools to constructively work through difficult cases as they arise; which can improve patient care and ameliorate moral distress. The presenters will address the ways in which preventative ethics rounds have impacted the formal consultation process, the types of ethical issues and patient characteristics discussed during rounds, and if/how these differ from those discussed during formal ethics consultation.

Bioethics Grand Rounds -Benjamen Berkman, JD, MPH

Wed, November 28, 2018, 12:00pm
Location: 
University Hospital Ford Auditorium

“Reexamining the Right Not to Know Genetic Information”

While promising to eventually revolutionize medical research and practice, the capacity to cheaply and quickly generate an individual's entire genome has not been without controversy. Producing information on this scale seems to violate some of the accepted norms governing how to practice medicine, norms that evolved during the early years of genetic testing when a targeted paradigm dominated. One of these widely accepted norms was that an individual has a right not to know genetic information about him or herself. Prompted by evolving professional practice guidelines, the right not to know has become a highly controversial topic, particularly in the context of research utilizing genomic sequencing. The medical community and bioethicists are actively engaged in a contentious debate about the extent to which individual choice should play a role (if at all) in determining which clinically significant findings are returned. This talk will explore the extent to which it is legally and ethically necessary to respect the so-called right not to know genetic information about oneself. Challenging the majority view that the right not to know is sacrosanct, the speaker will push back against that vigorously held (although not always rigorously defended) position, in defense of the idea that we should abandon the notion of a strong right not to know. Drawing on the fields of law, philosophy and social science, he will provide an extended argument in support of a default for returning high value genetic information without asking about a preference not to know. He will conclude by providing some recommendations about how best to balance individual autonomy and professional beneficence as the field of genomic medicine continues to evolve.

Submit Your Paper for Consideration in the ASBH Student Paper Competition

If you are a student who would like to be considered for the Student Paper Award, please send your paper to the ASBH office in an electronic format (Word or PDF) to candersen@asbh.org, with “ASBH Student Paper Competition” in the subject line.  All papers need to be received at the ASBH office by July 15, 2013 to be considered.    The Awards Committee will review and rank all submissions.  The top three papers will be placed in a special session at the Annual Meeting, and one winner will be chosen at the meeting by the Awards Committee. The award will be presented during the Members’ meeting.

All papers will be assessed anonymously.  Do not include identifying information in your paper submissions, such as title pages with your name. Previous winners are not eligible for consideration. Eligible papers should be no more than 3500 words in length. A student is defined as one who is actively pursuing an advanced degree and has not received a doctoral-level degree (e.g., MD, PhD, JD or equivalent degree). Authors who are not students according to the definition above are not eligible for the Student Paper Award. Coauthored papers are eligible only if all authors are students.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the ASBH office at: info@asbh.org

Thank you,
 
American Society for Bioethics + Humanities (ASBH)
Phone: 847-375-4745

www.asbh.org

 

Tue, January 10, 2017

Jeffrey Kullgren was recently featured in the Michigan Medicine article, "What do health plan deductibles really mean for people with chronic illness? New study takes a look." Dr. Kullgren co-authored a JAMA Internal Medicine Research Letter, which reports that even “low” deductible plans can mean high out-of-pocket costs for many Americans.

CBSSM Seminar: Dina Hafez Griauzde, MD

Wed, January 18, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Dina Hafez Griauzde, MD
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar
VA Special Fellow, Ann Arbor Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center
Clinical Lecturer, Internal Medicine

Abstract: Greater purpose in life (measured using a validated scale)  is associated with lower rates of certain chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease and stroke.  In this seminar, we will discuss the role of purpose in life in the development of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes as well as the potential to augment ongoing type 2 diabetes prevention efforts with strategies that promote greater purpose in life.

Pages