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CBSSM Seminar: Christina Hunter Chapman, M.D., M.S.

Wed, December 13, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Christina Hunter Chapman, M.D., M.S.
Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology

Title: African Americans and Tailored Cancer Screening: Evidence and Ethics

Abstract: Dr. Chapman will discuss the elevated cancer mortality that African Americans experience and the ethical barriers to consideration of tailored cancer screening strategies that have the potential to reduce this disparity.

Fri, December 29, 2017

Kayte Spector-Bagdady was recently quoted in the Undark Magazine article, "The Present and Future Asymmetry of Consumer Genetic Testing" about the difficulties with achieving truly informed consent.

Fri, February 02, 2018

Check out Dr. Kathy Miller's Medscape Oncology Insights interview with Reshma Jagsi from the 2017 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) about why physicians often overtreat elderly breast cancer patients.

The Genetics in Primary Care Institute recently launched its new website, featuring co-chairperson Beth Tarini, M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Michigan’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

Along with Robert Saul, M.D., Tarini co-chairs the Institute, which aims to take genetic advances made during the last decade and help make them useful in the practice of primary care pediatrics.

The new website, www.geneticsinprimarycare.org, features information for primary care providers related to genetics testing, ethical, legal and social issues, patient communication and family history.

Tarini’s research focuses on the communication process and the health outcomes associated with genetic testing in pediatrics. She is particularly interested in pediatric population-based screening programs, such as newborn screening. Through her research, Tarini seeks to optimize communication about genetic testing between parents and providers in an effort to maximize health and minimize harm.

The UMHS press release can be found here. Dr. Tarini's featured page can be found here

Thu, July 25, 2013

Dr. Arul Chinnaiyan and his team have been awarded 1 of 4 research grants ($7.97 million pending) from the National Institutes of Health to explore the use of genome sequencing in medical care. The new grants are funded as part of the National Human Genome Research Institute's (NHGRI) Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) program. NHGRI is part of NIH.

The team will sequence the genomes of tumors from 500 patients with advanced sarcoma or other rare cancers to discover new information about genomic alterations, with the goal of eventually customizing therapies. Few clinical trials have been conducted in most rare cancers, and scientists would like to know more about the genetic underpinnings of these diseases. Investigators also plan to evaluate the patient consent process, and the delivery and use of genome sequencing results.

Several CBSSM-affiliated faculty are involved with this project, including Scott Kim, Scott Roberts, Raymond De Vries, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, as well as Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Michele Gornick.

Berguer Lecture on Ethics: Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD

Fri, January 26, 2018, 4:00pm
Location: 
Danto Auditorium, Frankel Cardiovascular Center

6th BERGUER LECTURE ON ETHICS

"Communicating Everything Important Poorly vs. One Critical Thing Well"

Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Health and Behavior and Health Education
Research Associate Professor, Division of General Medicine, Department ofInternal Medicine
Associate Director, Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine

This lecture is open to faculty, staff, students, and the public having an interest in medical journalism, public policy and ethics.
At the conclusion of this lecture, participants will be able to acknowledge the ethical and societal importance of responsible medical journalism, and they will be able to respond to moral issues surrounding medical information in the press.
The University of Michigan Medical Schools is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
The University of Michigan Medical School designates this live activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s) TM.
Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Tue, March 27, 2018

U-M/AARP National Poll on Healthy Aging looks at perceived overuse of tests and medicines from the patient’s perspective. Doctors and older patients may disagree more often than either of them suspects about whether a particular medical test or medicine is truly necessary, according to findings from a new poll of Americans over age 50. Improving communication about that mismatch of opinions, the poll suggests, might reduce the use of unneeded scans, screenings, medications and procedures – and health care costs as well.

Jeffrey Kullgren designed the poll and analyzed its results. More details, a brief video, and a link to the full report of the findings and methodology can be found below.

Funded by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation

Investigators from University of Michigan’s Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation (IHPI), in partnership with the Detroit Health Department, the Southfield-Joy Community Development Corporation and five health plans insuring Detroit-based Medicaid and Healthy Michigan enrollees have collaboratively developed an innovative new model for a Community Health Worker-led (CHW) demonstration project in Detroit’s Cody Rouge neighborhood. The demonstration project will evaluate a potentially financially sustainable model targeting neighborhoods with high numbers of high- and under-health care utilizing Medicaid enrollees. The health plans will each deploy one of their CHWs to the project for a 12-month period. After undergoing joint training through the Michigan Community Health Worker Alliance (MICHWA) program and using assessment tools that cover shared domains, the CHWs will proactively reach out to identified beneficiaries to conduct an initial health and social needs assessment, develop an individualized ‘action plan’ with each beneficiary, work with neighborhood-based organizations to address each enrollee’s unique needs, and provide follow-up support as needed. CHWs will work closely with local organizations both to meet program participants’ needs and to strengthen community capacity to bridge gaps between healthcare services and community-level social determinants of health. The Detroit Health Department will provide office space for the CHWs to meet weekly in a neighborhood facility and provide ongoing booster support and mentorship. UM investigators will evaluate the program in a parallel, two-armed, randomized controlled pragmatic trial. We will evaluate effect on health care utilization among high-utilizing participants and zero-utilizing participants (ED visits, hospitalizations, primary care use) and health care costs at 6- and 12-months and compared to eligible individuals not yet enrolled in the project, on key patient-centered outcomes, and project costs, return on investment, and barriers and facilitators to adoption, implementation, maintenance, and potential spread.

PI: Michele Heisler
CBSSM Co-I: H. Myra Kim

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2013 - 2015.

With the aging of society and restructuring of families, it is increasingly important to understand how individuals become disabled. New disability is associated with increased mortality, substantial increases in medical costs (often borne by public payers), and a heavy burden on families and caregivers. While the disablement process?as theorized by Verburgge & Jette and their successors?has traditionally been seen as chronic and gradual, there is increasing recognition that acute events play a critical role in disability. Medical illnesses are not the only potentially disabling events. NIA & NINR recently posted PA-11-265, calling for ?Social and Behavioral Research on the Elderly in Disasters? in recognition that natural disasters are common, but we know little about their impact on health and disability. The National Research Council?s Committee on Population published a report in 2009 documenting not only our ignorance in this area, but, importantly, the potential value of studying disasters to understand fundamental processes in disability and health.
Our long-term research agenda is (a) to test the hypothesis that natural disasters cause enduring morbidity for survivors that is not fully addressed by existing health and welfare programs, and (b) to discover remediable mechanisms that generate that enduring morbidity. Here we propose a nationwide test of the association of living in a disaster area with individuals? long-term disability and health care use. To perform this test, we will combine the unique longitudinal resources of over 16,000 respondents in the linked Health and Retirement Study (HRS) / Medicare files with a newly constructed mapping of all FEMA disaster declarations between 1998 and 2012. We will address key gaps in the existing literature of detailed single-disaster studies with a generalizable perspective across time and space via these Specific Aims:
AIM 1: Quantify the association between the extent of a disaster ? measured as the repair cost to public infrastructure and increases in level of disability among survivors. We will follow respondents for an average of 5 years after the disaster. AIM 2: Quantify the association between the extent of a disaster and increases in the likelihood of hospitalization among survivors. AIM 3: Test the hypothesis that increases in level of disability and likelihood of hospitalization after disasters are worse for those living in counties with higher levels of poverty.
This proposal is specifically responsive to PA-11-265. This proposal is innovative because long-term effects of disasters, particularly for vulnerable older Americans, have been systematically neglected in previous research. It is significant because it will address the public health consequences of a relatively common but understudied exposure. Further, a key contribution of this R21 will be to evaluate the feasibility of the National Research Council conjecture that natural disasters can be studied as exogenous shocks to the environment, and that we can thereby test and elaborate usually endogenous mechanisms in the development of disability.

PI(s): Theodore Iwashyna

Co-I(s): Kenneth Langa, Yun Li, Anne Sales

Susan Goold presented a talk entitled, "Transforming public health: Deliberation, simulation, prioritization" at TEDxUofM, a university-wide initiative to galvanize the community for an event like no other: filled with inspiration, discovery and excitement. TEDxUofM takes place on Thursday, March 29, at the Power Center, 10 am - 5 pm.  Click here for more information.

Borrowing the template of the world-renowned TED conference, TEDxUofM aims to bring a TED-like experience to the University of Michigan. The vision is to showcase the most fascinating thinkers and doers, the "leaders and best" in Michigan terms, for a stimulating day of presentations, discussions, entertainment and art that will spark new ideas and opportunities across all disciplines.

TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. Started as a four-day conference in California 26 years ago, TED has grown to support those world-changing ideas with multiple initiatives. At TED, the world’s leading thinkers and doers are asked to give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Talks are then made available, free, at TED.com. TED speakers have included Bill Gates, Jane Goodall, Elizabeth Gilbert, Sir Richard Branson, Benoit Mandelbrot, Philippe Starck, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Isabel Allende and former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

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