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Thu, July 21, 2016

Due to food safety concerns, the FDA recently released a statement that strongly advises the public from indulging in raw cookie dough. In Brian Zikmund-Fisher response to the FDA's warning in The Conversation, he discusses balancing the minimization of risk with the maximization of life: "...let’s all please remind ourselves that our goal is not to minimize all risk, no matter the cost. Our goal is to maximize life. Sometimes maximizing life means warning people that their flour is contaminated and making sure they throw it out. Sometimes maximizing life means letting them enjoy some (carefully prepared) cookie dough without shame."

Research Topics: 
Thu, July 14, 2016

A new article in The Conversation authored by CBSSM Co-Director Raymond De Vries and colleague Tom Tomlinson from Michigan State University explores ethical concerns that may arise when patients donate blood and tissue samples to biobanks.

The article highlights results from their national survey, which indicated that respondents were not solely concerned with privacy, but had moral concerns about how their donations could be used in future research.

Fri, December 09, 2016

Kenneth Langa's national study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, was cited in a New York Times article discussing US dementia trends. Despite concern that dementia rates were increasing, Langa found that it is actually decreasing. He found that population brain health seemed to improve between 2000 and 2012 and that increasing educational attainment and better control of cardiovascular risk factors may have contributed to the improvement. However, the full set of social, behavioral, and medical factors contributing to the improvement is still uncertain.

Research Topics: 

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Sarah Hawley, Reshma Jagsi and others were recently published in a JAMA Oncology research letter on breast cancer patient risk communication. They found that medical oncologists were found to be far more likely than surgeons to quantify risk estimates for patients and that patients who do not see a medical oncologist may make treatment decisions, including surgery, without all relevant risk information.

For the full article: http://oncology.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2491464

 

The new, enhanced UMHS Ethics committee was featured in the Office of Clinical Affairs "Chief Brief." According to the article, "ECCA members complimented the committee’s improved access to ethics consultation services, focus on proactive and preventative ethics education, and unification of adult and pediatric efforts. Since the programmatic rollout, there has been a 45 percent increase in clinical ethics consultation volume from the prior year, and an 82 percent increase from average of the prior five years." Dr. Andrew Shuman and Dr. Christian Vercler are the co-directors of CBSSM's Program in Clinical Ethics. Dr. Janice Firn is the clinical ethicist who manages the program on a daily basis.

Alan R. Tait, PhD

Faculty

Dr. Tait is the Department of Anesthesiology Endowed Professor of Clinical Research. Dr. Tait is a former long-standing member of the Institutional Review Board and a current member of the Medical School Admissions Executive Committee. In addition, Dr. Tait is the Chair of the Research Committee for the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia.

Last Name: 
Tait

Kathryn Moseley, MD, MPH

Michele Heisler, MD, MPA

Faculty

Michele Heisler, MD, MPA, is Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School, Professor, School of Public Health, and Research Scientist at the Ann Arbor VA's Center for Clinical Research Management. Dr. Heisler's clinical interest is chronic disease, with a focus on diabetes. Her research centers on patient self-management of chronic illnesses, patient-doctor relations and disparities in processes and outcomes in chronic illnesses.

Last Name: 
Heisler

Funded by VA Health Services Research and Development Career Development Award

Funding Years: 2015-2019

Heart attack and stroke, which together are called cardiovascular disease, cause over 1/3 of all deaths in VA patients. The current guidelines for the prevention of these conditions focus on lowering patients'blood pressure and cholesterol levels. A new treatment strategy, which I call benefit-based tailored treatment, that instead guides treatment decisions based on the likelihood that a medication would prevent a heart attack or stroke could prevent more cardiovascular disease, with lower medication use, and be more patient centered. The purpose of this Career Development Award is to develop and assess tools and approaches that could enable the implementation of benefit-based tailored treatment of cardiovascular disease, in particular a decision support tool and educational program for clinicians and a performance profiling system. The decision support tool will enable better care by showing clinicians patient-specific estimates of the likelihood that their medication decisions will prevent a cardiovascular disease event. The performance profiling system will encourage better care by assessing the quality of care provided at VA sites and in PACT teams based on how well the medical care provided follows this treatment strategy. The project will have three aims:
Aim 1 : In the first aim, I will seek to understand clinicians'and patients'perceptions of and receptivity to the use of benefit-based tailored treatment for cardiovascular disease. Information gained from qualitative research with clinicians will help assess and improve the usability and effectiveness of the decision support tool and educational program for clinicians, along with the acceptability of the treatment strategies in general. Information gained from focus groups with patients will help learn their priorities in cardiovascular disease prevention, to help identify ways to make the interventions and their assessments more patient-centered.
Aim 2 : In the second aim, the decision support tool and educational program will be assessed in a real-world randomized pilot study involving thirty clinicians. Half of the clinicians will be provided the decision support tool and education intervention for ten patients each, the other half will receive a traditional quality improvement program and treatment reminders. The study will have formative goals of ensuring that clinicians and patients believe the tool is valuable and does not disrupt care processes or workflow for anyone in the PACT team. This will be studied with qualitative and survey assessments. The primary summative outcome will be the influence of the intervention on clinicians'treatment decisions. Secondary outcomes will assess patients'satisfaction with their visits and their clinicians.
Aim 3 :
The third aim will develop and evaluate a novel performance measurement system based on benefit- based tailored treatment. First, the performance profiling system will be developed. Then the profiling system's ability to reliably differentiate high quality from low-quality care will be evaluated.

PI: Jeremy Sussman

Carl Schneider, JD

Faculty

Carl E. Schneider is the Chauncey Stillman Professor for Ethics, Morality, and the Practice of Law and is a Professor of Internal Medicine. He was educated at Harvard College and the University of Michigan Law School, where he was editor in chief of the Michigan Law Review. He served as law clerk to Judge Carl McGowan of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and to Justice Potter Stewart of the United States Supreme Court. He became a member of the Law School faculty in 1981 and of the Medical School faculty in 1998. 

Last Name: 
Schneider

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