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Funded by National Institutes of Health; National Institute on Aging

Funding Years; 2011-2016

A cornerstone of the nation's social science research infrastructure, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. families. Begun in 1968, 36 waves of data have now been collected on PSID families and their descendents. Its long-term measures of economic and social wellbeing have spurred researchers and policy makers to attend to the fundamental dynamism inherent in social and behavioral processes. The PSID is increasingly being used to answer innovative social and behavioral research questions in the context of an aging society. This application proposes to collect, process, and disseminate three modules in the 2013 and 2015 waves of the PSID: 1. Health module: Including 15 minutes of survey questions on health status, health behaviors, health insurance coverage & health care costs. Linkages to the National Death Index and Medicare will be extended; 2. Wealth module: Including 10 minutes of survey questions on wealth, active savings, and pensions. Linkage to Social Security earnings and benefits records for active sample and decedents will be undertaken for the first time, and a new module to minimize errors in reports of wealth changes will be developed and implemented; and 3. Wellbeing module with related psychosocial measures: We will design and implement a mixed-mode (web/mail out) questionnaire to collect content from both respondents and spouses about their wellbeing and related psychosocial measures (e.g., personality, intelligence), with an experiment to identify (and allow researchers to adjust for if necessary) mode effects. After collection, the data will be processed and distributed in the PSID Online Data Center, which will allow users to create customized extracts and codebooks using a cross-year variable index.

PI(s): Robert Schoeni

Co-I(s): Charles Brown, James House, Mick Couper

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, June 27, 2018, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Auditorium

Title: Use of Preventive Ethics Rounds to Identify, Anticipate, and Proactively Address Ethical Dilemmas

Presenters: Janice Firn, PhD, LMSW,  Katie Feder, M2, Sally Salari, M4

The intersection of complex, critical illness and evolving medical technology in hospital intensive care units (ICUs) drives ethical dilemmas which in turn affect patient care and contribute to moral distress and burnout in providers. Rounding regularly in ICUs allows clinical ethicists to proactively intervene in ethically challenging cases at a time when they are most amenable to intervention. Through case discussion, clinical ethicists can help educate and support critical care providers in thinking through ethical issues pertinent to patient care throughout the hospital course. This approach can be helpful in offering a common language and framework for addressing ethical issues in every day clinical practice. To provide real-time education in the clinical context and early identification of ethical issues, Michigan Medicine initiated novel, system-wide “preventive ethics rounds” in all the ICUs (medical and surgical, adult and pediatric) in the form of a pre-consult rounding service. Providers use ethics related tools to constructively work through difficult cases as they arise; which can improve patient care and ameliorate moral distress. The presenters will address the ways in which preventative ethics rounds have impacted the formal consultation process, the types of ethical issues and patient characteristics discussed during rounds, and if/how these differ from those discussed during formal ethics consultation.

Tue, January 10, 2017

Jeffrey Kullgren was recently featured in the Michigan Medicine article, "What do health plan deductibles really mean for people with chronic illness? New study takes a look." Dr. Kullgren co-authored a JAMA Internal Medicine Research Letter, which reports that even “low” deductible plans can mean high out-of-pocket costs for many Americans.

CBSSM Seminar: Dina Hafez Griauzde, MD

Wed, January 18, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Dina Hafez Griauzde, MD
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar
VA Special Fellow, Ann Arbor Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center
Clinical Lecturer, Internal Medicine

Abstract: Greater purpose in life (measured using a validated scale)  is associated with lower rates of certain chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease and stroke.  In this seminar, we will discuss the role of purpose in life in the development of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes as well as the potential to augment ongoing type 2 diabetes prevention efforts with strategies that promote greater purpose in life.

Raymond De Vries is involved in a new research study led by Akbar Waljee, MD, MSc, which will develop a risk-based strategy to help providers tailor timing of treatments among CHC Veterans to ensure that those who most need urgent therapy get it as quickly as possible.

Using democratic deliberation, Dr. De Vries will engage Veterans to learn their thoughts and preferences about such a strategy, which will help with its implementation in a clinical setting.

Click here for more details.

Mon, January 30, 2017

Brian Zikmund-Fisher's The Conversation piece on raw cookie dough was cited in the Popular Science Health article, "The Chemicals In Burnt Toast And Crispy Fries Won't Kill You, But The Calories Might."

Mon, January 30, 2017

Kayte Spector-Bagdady has a new commentary out in The Conversation about the law and ethics of research with human biospecimens. It focuses on the recently published revisions to the human subjects research regulations, highlights the debate that ensued from a draft version over its proposal to include nonidentified biospecimens in its definition of "human subject," and summarizes where the final rule landed and possible steps going forward.

Research Topics: 
Wed, February 01, 2017

Raymond De Vries' commentary, "Giving (Bits of) Your Self to Medicine" was recently published in Medicine at Michigan. He and his colleague, Tom Tomlinson (MSU), published national survey data in JAMA that showed that while most Americans are willing to donate to biobanks, they have serious concerns about how we ask for their consent and about how their donations may be used in future research.

CBSSM Seminar: Martina T. Caldwell, MD

Wed, February 22, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Martina T. Caldwell, MD
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar
VA Special Fellow, Ann Arbor Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center
Clinical Lecturer, Emergency Medicine

Title: Leveraging the Emergency Department for Women’s Reproductive Health Equity

Abstract: As a Robert Wood Johnson / VA Clinical Scholar at the University of Michigan, Dr. Caldwell’s research centers around community-based participatory research frameworks and mixed methodology to develop Emergency Department interventions to help eliminate health inequities in birth control access, uptake and continuation, as well as birth outcomes.

CBSSM Seminar: Tammy Chang, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.

Thu, March 09, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Tammy Chang, MD, MPH, MS
Assistant Professor, Family Medicine

"Tell us what you REALLY think: Challenges with understanding and engaging youth via technology"

Understanding and engaging youth is crucial to addressing nearly all health challenges today.  However, what are the most effective ways?  How can we use technology that is ubiquitous in their lives?  In this seminar, I will discuss our team’s work in addressing these challenges using text messaging and social media to understand and engage youth.

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