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CBSSM Seminar: Stephen Molldrem, PhD Candidate

Thu, July 07, 2016, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 16, Conference Rm 266C

Stephen Molldrem, PhD Candidate, American Culture

Title: Collecting and Managing Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data in Health Contexts: Bioethical Dilemmas from a Queer Historical Perspective

Abstract: This talk, drawn from dissertation research, historicizes a number of regulatory changes governing the collection and management of sexual orientation and gender identity data in health contexts in the United States that have taken place since 2009. It focuses on a range of less-considered bioethical dilemmas that stem from the introduction of questions about sexual orientation and gender identity into the battery of demographic information collected in certified Electronic Health Record technologies.

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, July 27, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Kunal Bailoor, MD Candidate Class of 2018, Ethics Path of Excellence

"Advance Care Planning: Beyond Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA)"

Abstract: Advance care planning is a crucial part of end of life medical care. It can take many forms, including designation of a surrogate decision maker via a DPOA document. However it can also involve living wills, physicians orders for life sustaining treatment (POLSTs), or even simply clinician patient conversation. The newly revised hospital policy on advance directives reflects this broader approach. The talk will include a brief review of the philosophical and ethical basis of advance care planning before diving into a discussion of the new hospital policy and it's impact on practice.

 

CBSSM-affiliated faculty and staff recently presented at the Western Michigan University Ethics Center's Conference on Preparing for the Unknown. One of our post-doctoral research fellows, Kayte Spector-Bagdady presented, “The Google of Personalized Healthcare: 23andMe and Enabling the Privatization of Genetic Biobanking”. In addition, Lan Le, Nicole Exe, Natalie Bartnik and Michele Gornick presented a panel on “Examining the Psychosocial and Ethical Issues Arising from the Identification, Disclosure and Communication of Genomic Results to Patients and Clinicians.” This panel was moderated by our co-director, Raymond De Vries.

CBSSM Seminar: Susan Goold & Zachary Rowe (DECIDERS Project)

Thu, December 15, 2016, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA
Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School
Professor of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health

Zachary Rowe
Executive Director of Friends of Parkside (FOP)

Title:  Evaluation of CHAT as a tool for engaging communities in priority setting

Abstract:  Engaging minority and underserved communities in setting research priorities could make the scientific research agenda more equitable and more responsive to their needs.  This presentation evaluates CHAT, a serious game, to prioritize health research based on feedback from 47 focus groups (N=519) across Michigan.

Thu, July 21, 2016

Due to food safety concerns, the FDA recently released a statement that strongly advises the public from indulging in raw cookie dough. In Brian Zikmund-Fisher response to the FDA's warning in The Conversation, he discusses balancing the minimization of risk with the maximization of life: "...let’s all please remind ourselves that our goal is not to minimize all risk, no matter the cost. Our goal is to maximize life. Sometimes maximizing life means warning people that their flour is contaminated and making sure they throw it out. Sometimes maximizing life means letting them enjoy some (carefully prepared) cookie dough without shame."

Research Topics: 
Thu, July 14, 2016

A new article in The Conversation authored by CBSSM Co-Director Raymond De Vries and colleague Tom Tomlinson from Michigan State University explores ethical concerns that may arise when patients donate blood and tissue samples to biobanks.

The article highlights results from their national survey, which indicated that respondents were not solely concerned with privacy, but had moral concerns about how their donations could be used in future research.

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Sarah Hawley, Reshma Jagsi and others were recently published in a JAMA Oncology research letter on breast cancer patient risk communication. They found that medical oncologists were found to be far more likely than surgeons to quantify risk estimates for patients and that patients who do not see a medical oncologist may make treatment decisions, including surgery, without all relevant risk information.

For the full article: http://oncology.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2491464

 

Kathryn Moseley, MD, MPH

2017 CBSSM Research Colloquium and Bishop Lecture (Norman Daniels, PhD)

Tue, April 25, 2017, 8:30am
Location: 
Great Lakes Room, Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) Research Colloquium was held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at the Great Lakes Room, Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium featured the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  Norman Daniels, PhD presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: “Universal Access vs Universal Coverage: Two models of what we should aim for."

Norman Daniels, PhD is Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health. Formerly chair of the Philosophy Department at Tufts University, his most recent books include Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly (Cambridge, 2008); Setting Limits Fairly: Learning to Share Resources for Health, 2nd edition, (Oxford, 2008); From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice (2000); Is Inequality Bad for Our Health? (2000); and Identified versus Statistical Lives (Oxford 2015). He has published 200 peer-reviewed articles and as many book chapters, editorials, and book reviews. His research is on justice and health policy, including priority setting in health systems, fairness and health systems reform, health inequalities, and intergenerational justice. A member of the IOM, a Fellow of the Hastings Center, and formerly on the ethics advisory boards of the CDC and the CIHR, he directs the Ethics concentration of the Health Policy PhD at Harvard and recently won the Everett Mendelsohn Award for mentoring graduate students.

2017 Colloquium Schedule:

  • 8:30     Check in, refreshments
  • 9:05     Welcome
  • 9:10     Presentation 1: “Setting priorities for Medicaid: The views of minority and underserved communities” Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA & Zachary Rowe, Executive Director, Friends of Parkside
  • 9:35     Presentation 2: ““How Acceptable Is Paternalism? A Survey-Based Study of Clinician and Non-clinician Opinions on Decision Making After Life Threatening Stroke” Kunal Bailoor, MD Candidate
  • 10:00   Medical Student in Ethics Award
  • 10:10   Presentation 3: “Ethical Challenges Faced by Providers in Pediatric Death: A Qualitative Thematic Analysis” Stephanie Kukora, MD
  • 10:35   Presentation 4: “Capacity for Preferences:  An overlooked criterion for resolving ethical dilemmas with incapacitated patients” Jason Wasserman, PhD & Mark Navin, PhD
  • 11:00   Break
  • 11:15  Bishop Lecture: Norman Daniels, PhD
  • 12:45  Lunch

Announcement of Position: Faculty Ethicist

Announcement of Position: Faculty Ethicist


Background
The Clinical Ethics Service within the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) promotes a culture of patient-centered excellence by performing a comprehensive set of ethics-related activities. The aims of this service are to: liaise with and provide support to the adult and pediatric ethics committees; provide clinical ethics consultation and engage in preventative ethics endeavors; assist with ethics-related policy development on a regular and proactive basis; organize and administer structured educational programs in clinical ethics; and coordinate empiric research with relevance to clinical ethics within CBSSM.

Program Organization
The Clinical Ethics Service is led by Christian J. Vercler, MD MA and Andrew G. Shuman, MD. A dedicated clinical ethicist will manage the program on a daily basis. A cadre of faculty ethicists will rotate on service throughout the year and work closely with the clinical ethicist. Trainees and students will rotate as well. Dedicated administrative support is organized through CBSSM.


Position
The Clinical Ethics Service employs a roster of faculty ethicists who are responsible for staffing ethics consultations arising from any of the clinical venues (inpatient and outpatient; adult and pediatric) within Michigan Medicine during their time on service. They will supervise and participate in the institutional educational endeavors and preventative ethics rounds in a regular and on-going manner. Faculty ethicists will also develop and provide clinical rotations for medical students and house officers on a cohesive ethics service. Each faculty member will be expected to rotate on service for four to six weeks per year, and attend/participate in committee meetings and other events throughout the academic year (this will not necessarily require suspension of other activities when on-service). Depending on the total number appointed, each faculty ethicist will receive $15,000-$20,000 of direct salary support annually, to be distributed and allocated in conjunction with their home department. The initial appointment will last two and a half years and is renewable. Additional appointments will last two years.


Qualifications
Candidates are expected to have faculty appointments at University of Michigan and be in good academic standing; any professional background is acceptable. Candidates are expected to have qualifications that meet the standards outlined by The American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) for accreditation for clinical ethics consultants. Direct experience with clinical ethics consultation is required. Familiarity with ethics education and related clinical research would be helpful. Excellent organizational and communication skills across multidisciplinary medical fields are required.


Application Process
Candidates will be vetted and chosen by a selection committee. Candidates are asked to submit:

  • Curriculum vitae or resume
  • One page maximum summary of (1) education/training related to ethics consultation; (2) clinical ethics consultation experience; and (3) motivation/interest in the position
  • Letter of support from Department Chair/Division Head/Center Director or equivalent
  • Submit formal application via email to: lynnam@med.umich.edu


Timeline

  • Application is due September 25, 2017
  • Appointment will take effect January 1, 2018

Contacts

  • Leaders of the Clinical Ethics Service: Christian J. Vercler, MD MA & Andrew G. Shuman, MD
  • Administrative contact: Valerie Kahn – valkahn@med.umich.edu 734 615 5371

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