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Funded by National Institutes of Health; Nationatal Institute on Aging

Funding Years: 2012-2017

A cornerstone of the nation’s social science research infrastructure, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. families. Begun in 1968, 36 waves of data have now been collected on PSID families and their descendents. Its long-term measures of economic and social well-being have spurred researchers and policy makers to attend to the fundamental dynamism inherent in social and behavioral processes. This project collects, processes, and disseminates three modules in the 2013 and 2015 waves of the PSID:
1.Health module: Including 15 minutes of survey questions on health status, health behaviors, health insurance coverage & health care costs. Linkages to the National Death Index and Medicare will be extended;
2.Wealth module: Including 10 minutes of survey questions on wealth, active savings, and pensions. Linkage to Social Security earnings and benefits records for active sample and decedents will be undertaken for the first time, and a new module to minimize errors in reports of wealth changes will be developed and implemented; and
3.Well-being module with related psychosocial measures: A mixed-mode (web/mail out) questionnaire to collect content from both respondents and spouses about their well-being and related psychosocial measures (e.g., personality, intelligence), with an experiment to identify (and allow researchers to adjust for if necessary) mode effects.

PI(s): Robert Schoeni

Co-I(s): Mick Couper, Vicki Freedman, Katherine McGonagle

Brian Zikmund-Fisher,  Angela Fagerlin, Nicole Exe, and Knoll Larkin have been involved in the Visualizing Health Project, which has recently launched an online style guide  for communicating health data. You can check it out at: www.vizhealth.org

The Visualizing Health project was a short and highly intense project funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation designed to push the envelope both in considering visual designs for communicating health risk data and in developing iterative research approaches for testing them. The project involved a large team combining researchers and staff from both the University of Michigan's Center for Health Communications Research and the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine. The UM team then worked closely on a week by week basis with Thomas Goetz (former editor of Wired magazine) who envisioned the project, Tim Leong (graphic designer, author of Super Graphic), Andrea Ducas from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and teams of graphic designers that Tim recruited.

They created 16 distinct visual data display tasks related to health risks, had teams of graphic designers develop display concepts, and iteratively tested these displays using multiple online survey methodologies. The resulting designs and data were then assembled in a project website that included all the images, plus commentary and additional features such as a design "wizard" to help guide users to visual displays that best fit their personal needs.

Also, see the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of health blog.

Sacha Montas, JD, MD

Faculty

Dr. Montas is a Clinical Lecturer in the Department of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Montas holds a law and medical degrees from the University of Michigan and a Master of Bioethics from the University of Pennsylvania. He has been a member of the University of Michigan Adult Ethics Committee since 2009. His research interest is in the intersection of Law and Medicine, and Bioethics, with a focus on the influence of the legal system and legal norms on patient-physician communication and decision making.

Last Name: 
Montas

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, July 27, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Kunal Bailoor, MD Candidate Class of 2018, Ethics Path of Excellence

"Advance Care Planning: Beyond Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA)"

Abstract: Advance care planning is a crucial part of end of life medical care. It can take many forms, including designation of a surrogate decision maker via a DPOA document. However it can also involve living wills, physicians orders for life sustaining treatment (POLSTs), or even simply clinician patient conversation. The newly revised hospital policy on advance directives reflects this broader approach. The talk will include a brief review of the philosophical and ethical basis of advance care planning before diving into a discussion of the new hospital policy and it's impact on practice.

 

CBSSM Seminar: Terri Voepel-Lewis, RN, PhD

Wed, January 31, 2018, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Terri Voepel-Lewis, RN, PhD
Associate Research Scientist, Anesthesiology

Title: Can scenario-tailored opioid education improve parental risk understanding, shift risk avoidance preferences and improve decision-making?

Abstract: This talk will summarize findings from our recent work demonstrating how parents’ risk knowledge & perceptions together with their pain relief preferences affect their decisions to give or withhold opioids. I will describe our novel educational intervention that may be able to enhance specific risk perceptions, shift preferences toward risk aversion, and improve the safety of opioid decision-making.

Tue, February 06, 2018

Naomi Laventhal was recently interviewed for a Smithsonian Magazine article entitled, "Now You Can Genetically Test Your Child For Disease Risks. Should You?"  In this article, studies by several CBSSM faculty and staff were highlighted.

CBSSM Seminar: Laura Scherer, PhD

Tue, February 06, 2018, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Laura Scherer, PhD

Assistant Professor, Psychological Sciences
University of Missouri

 

Title: Exploring the psychology of overuse and underuse: Understanding the reasons for healthcare seeking and avoidance

Abstract: Overuse and underuse of healthcare resources are two major problems that stand in the way of maximizing patient outcomes and delivering optimal care. Both problems can stem from structural factors (e.g. healthcare access, defensive medicine, direct-to-consumer advertising), but the psychological aspects of overuse and underuse are often overlooked. This talk will discuss some of the psychological processes that can cause patients to seek healthcare that may cause more harm than benefit, and avoid or refuse healthcare that is beneficial.

 

Bioethics Grand Rounds-Deborah Berman, MD

Wed, January 24, 2018, 12:00pm
Location: 
University Hospital Ford Auditorium

Fetal Therapy: Just Because We can, Should We?

In utero fetal treatment is a complex undertaking that involves Maternal Fetal Medicine as well as a multidisciplinary team that focuses on prenatal diagnosis of specific pregnancy related complications and subsequent fetal therapy with the aim to improve fetal and neonatal outcomes. Several issues, including ethical and legal considerations, are particular to fetal medicine. This talk aims to highlight specific fetal complications in which fetal interventions are an option. In addition, the complex nature of the consultations, interventions, and implications for the patient, family, fetus in the present and future will be discussed.

Tue, January 16, 2018

CBSSM Director, Reshma Jagsi was recently interviewed for the LA Times article, "Will medicine be the next field to face a sexual harassment reckoning?" This article discusses her 2014 survey on sexual harassment and gender bias in academic medicine, as well as her recent article on the #MeToo movement as it relates to medicine in the New England Journal of Medicine.

CBSSM Seminar: Matthew Kay, PhD, MS

Wed, March 21, 2018, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Matthew Kay, PhD, MS
Assistant Professor of Information, School of Information and Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering

"Uncertainty visualization using discrete outcomes"

Abstract: Understanding uncertainty is necessary to make informed decisions from predictions: If my bus is predicted to arrive 10 minutes from now, what is the chance it actually shows up in 5 minutes—and more importantly, do I have time to get a coffee? I will outline a generalized approach to uncertainty visualization—discrete outcomes—that has found success in many contexts, including medical risk communication and hurricane path prediction, and give examples from my own work in transit arrival time prediction.

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