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Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, September 28, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Carl Schneider, JD -- “Can Informed-Consent Laws Work? Evaluating Compelled Disclosure as a Method of Regulation”

Abstract: The law of informed consent is an example of a form of legal regulation called mandated disclosure.  In such regulation, one party to a transaction is required to give the other party to the transaction information to use in making decisions about the parties’ relationship.  There are hundreds of examples of such legal rules besides medical informed consent. This talk asks how well these rules have worked outside medicine. It concludes that there is little evidence that those rules ever work, explores some of the reasons for this surprising failure, and asks what the failure of mandated disclosure outside medicine tells us about the success of informed-consent laws in medicine.

Bioethics Grand Rounds: Paul Lichter, MD

Wed, November 30, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Paul Lichter, MD

The Medical-Industrial Complex is alive and well and has been that way for decades.  The Complex depends on strong cooperation from physicians.  Not only do physicians help industry to develop drugs and devices, they then take part in selling them to their fellow physicians.  The physician-as-drug-rep is driven by money and by the culture of reciprocity in our society.  This talk will review the foundations of the Medical-Industrial Complex and the reasons why it is able to control a great deal of medical practice in our country.  Physicians rarely if ever believe they are biased and Industry works hard to enforce that belief.  Money provided by Industry to physicians in essence creates a contract, however subtle, whereby physicians will sell drugs and devices for Industry.  We will discuss the ethical issues surrounding physician-industry relationships as part of the Medical-Industrial Complex.

Thu, February 11, 2016

Raymond De Vries, PhD and Scott Kim, MD, PhD 's study of euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS) for persons with psychiatric illnesses was recently written up in the New York Times. They found that persons receiving EAS for psychiatric disorders in the Netherlands were mostly women, of diverse ages, with complex and chronic psychiatric, medical, and psychosocial histories. They also reported that in more than half of approved cases, people had declined treatment that could have helped, and that many cited loneliness as an important reason for wanting to die. Dr. De Vries and Dr. Kim are current and former co-directors of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) .


Citation: Kim SYH, DeVries RG, Peteet JR. Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide of Patients With Psychiatric Disorders in the Netherlands 2011 to 2014. JAMA Psychiatry. 2016.

 

Fri, October 30, 2015

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was quoted by a number of news outlets on the relaunch of 23andme.

In an interview for the LA Time article regarding the relaunch, “Genetic testing evolves, along with health and ethics debates,” Brian Zikmund-Fisher disagrees that more information is always good.  Dr. Zikmund-Fisher points out, "Providing people with more information is not helpful if they can't do anything about it, or it leads them to focus on the wrong thing" — on their genes rather than their lifestyles, for example.”

Holly Witteman, formerly a post doctoral fellow at CBSSM and currently an assistant professor in the Faculty of Medicine at Université Laval, and colleagues’ 2016 article “One-Sided Social Media Comments Influenced Opinions And Intentions About Home Birth: An Experimental Study” was featured on Eurekalert!  an online, global news service operated by AAAS, the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The article was published in the April edition of Health Affairs and the co-authors are Angela Fagerlin, Nicole Exe, Marie-Eve Trottier and Brian Zikmund-Fisher.

An online experiment revealed that one-sided comments after health articles could influence people’s opinion about the health topic. It raises questions about how to ensure health related comment sections remain balanced.

EurekAlert!

Research Topics: 

Bioethics Grand Rounds: “Examining the Ethics of Victors Care”

Wed, February 28, 2018, 12:00pm
Location: 
Univerisity Hospital Ford Auditorium

Michigan Medicine has launched Victors Care, a concierge medical care model designed to deliver increased access, convenience and individually-tailored support within a primary care practice for patients who pay for membership. Like all concierge care programs, Victors Care raises ethical issues relating to justice, fairness, access, and consistency with the mission of Michigan Medicine. This Bioethics Grand Rounds will address the ethical issues of concierge care in a panel format with institutional leaders. The panel will address your questions directly. Questions will be solicited during the session, and can be submitted in advance via: https://umichumhs.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_b4nJWM70ahHQtjD.

Panelists
Marschall S. Runge, M.D., Ph.D., EVPMA and Dean
Reshma Jagsi, M.D., D.Phil, Director, Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine
David J. Brown, M.D., Associate Vice President and Associate Dean for Health Equity and Inclusion

Facilitators
Andrew Shuman, M.D., F.A.C.S & Christian J. Vercler, M.D, M.A, F.A.C.S – Service Chiefs, Clinical Ethics Service, Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine

The University of Michigan School of Public Health has received federal funding to launch an integrated, interdisciplinary fellowship program that will provide training in the ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of genomic science.

Led by Scott Roberts, professor of health behavior and health education at Michigan Public Health, the ELSI Research Training Program is funded by a T32 training grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Human Genome Research Institute and will launch in fall 2018. Raymond De Vries, Wendy Uhlmann, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Jodyn Platt, Kayte Spector-Bagdady are among the faculty who will serve as faculty mentors.

More information can be found here.

Research Topics: 

Funded by National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2011-2016

This proposal seeks to advance our understanding of the role of psychosocial and environmental health risk factors as well as medical care in understanding the large socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in health and the way health changes with age in our society. It does so by proposing to extend to four waves and 15 years of follow-up an ongoing prospective study (known as Americans' Changing Lives) of a nationally representative sample of 3,617 adults aged 25 and over in the coterminous United States, who were first interviewed in 1986, with reinterviews of about 83 percent of the surviving members of the original sample already completed in 1989 and 1994, along with ongoing mortality ascertainment on the full original 1986 sample. A proposed fourth wave would be collected on about 83 percent of the surviving sample (estimated respondents - 2,300 of about 2,800 survivors) in 2001, primarily by telephone and in person as necessary, with mortality ascertainment continuing indefinitely and the hope and intent of reinterviewing surviving respondents again about 20-22.5 years after the baseline interview. The ongoing ACL study has generated a large body of publications both by staff of the ACL project and users of the public use data sets for the first two waves (with the third wave to be archived for public use by the end of 1999). ACL analyses and publications have illuminated to the role of a broad range of psychosocial factors, ranging from health behaviors through stress and adaptive resources to productive activities, in predicting health, changes in health and mortality, and in mediating or explaining socioeconomic differences in health. It has also played a major role in understanding the nature, causes, and consequences of paid and unpaid productive activities over the lifecourse. The proposed continuation and extension of the ACL project will address a number of aims: (1) continuing and enhancing ongoing analysis by extending prospective follow-up to 15 years, allowing for better analysis of- (a) time- varying covariates, (b) the impact of changes in risk factors on changes in health, and (c) potential reciprocal relationships between and among SES, psychosocial risk factors and health; (2) enhancing and improving the measurement of a number of variables already being considered in ongoing analysis, including SES (e.g., improving assessment of wealth), productive activities, religious beliefs and behaviors, and personality or dispositional factors (e.g., hostility, optimism, hopelessness, and John Henryism); (3) adding new measures to ACL 4 or (via archival data) to all waves of data for both medical care and exposures in physical and social environments; and (4) to undertake more focused analysis of racial/ethnic differences in health and explanations of them.

PI(s): Sarah Burgard

Co-I(s): Wen Ye, Michael Elliott, Philippa Clarke, Kenneth Langa

Susan Goold presented a talk entitled, "Transforming public health: Deliberation, simulation, prioritization" at TEDxUofM, a university-wide initiative to galvanize the community for an event like no other: filled with inspiration, discovery and excitement. TEDxUofM takes place on Thursday, March 29, at the Power Center, 10 am - 5 pm.  Click here for more information.

Borrowing the template of the world-renowned TED conference, TEDxUofM aims to bring a TED-like experience to the University of Michigan. The vision is to showcase the most fascinating thinkers and doers, the "leaders and best" in Michigan terms, for a stimulating day of presentations, discussions, entertainment and art that will spark new ideas and opportunities across all disciplines.

TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. Started as a four-day conference in California 26 years ago, TED has grown to support those world-changing ideas with multiple initiatives. At TED, the world’s leading thinkers and doers are asked to give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Talks are then made available, free, at TED.com. TED speakers have included Bill Gates, Jane Goodall, Elizabeth Gilbert, Sir Richard Branson, Benoit Mandelbrot, Philippe Starck, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Isabel Allende and former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

Submit Your Paper for Consideration in the ASBH Student Paper Competition

If you are a student who would like to be considered for the Student Paper Award, please send your paper to the ASBH office in an electronic format (Word or PDF) to candersen@asbh.org, with “ASBH Student Paper Competition” in the subject line.  All papers need to be received at the ASBH office by July 15, 2013 to be considered.    The Awards Committee will review and rank all submissions.  The top three papers will be placed in a special session at the Annual Meeting, and one winner will be chosen at the meeting by the Awards Committee. The award will be presented during the Members’ meeting.

All papers will be assessed anonymously.  Do not include identifying information in your paper submissions, such as title pages with your name. Previous winners are not eligible for consideration. Eligible papers should be no more than 3500 words in length. A student is defined as one who is actively pursuing an advanced degree and has not received a doctoral-level degree (e.g., MD, PhD, JD or equivalent degree). Authors who are not students according to the definition above are not eligible for the Student Paper Award. Coauthored papers are eligible only if all authors are students.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the ASBH office at: info@asbh.org

Thank you,
 
American Society for Bioethics + Humanities (ASBH)
Phone: 847-375-4745

www.asbh.org

 

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