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Panel Discussion: Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Genetics and Newborn Screening

Mon, September 25, 2017, 6:00pm
Location: 
Vandenberg Room, Michigan League

Join Joselin Linder, author of “The Family Gene”, and Jodyn Platt, assistant professor in the U-M Medical School in a panel discussion about the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetics and newborn screening. The conversation will be moderated by Kayte Spector-Bagdady, assistant professor in the U-M Medical School and chief of the research ethics service in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine.

Tue, September 26, 2017

Dean Shumway, Rochelle Jones, Sarah Hawley, and Reshma Jagsi are co-authors of a study, published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology, which found that clinician attitudes and patient expectations are driving overtreatment of radiotherapy in older breast cancer patients.

Mon, October 02, 2017

Sarah Hawley, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, and Reshma Jagsi are co-authors of a recent study published in Medical Decision Making, which was highlighted in MHealth Lab. Their study found that talking to clinicians is the best way for breast cancer patients to understand their recurrence risk. They also found that clinician discussions about recurrence risk should address uncertainty and the relevance of family and personal history. Kamaria Lee is first author of the article.

Wed, October 11, 2017

In an editorial in Nature Human Behaviour, Brian Zikmund-Fisher discusses the findings of a recent study about the unintended consequences of argument dilution in direct-to-consumer drug advertising. In a series of experiments, study authors, Niro Sivanathan and Hemant Kakker found that long lists of serious and minor side effects found in drug advertisements actually "dilute" consumers' judgments of the overall risk from side effects.

Thu, October 26, 2017

In a new analysis in Health Affairs, CBSSM's Jeffrey Kullgren and fellow researchers found that while the "Choosing Wisely" campaign to reduce overtesting and overtreatment is off to a strong start, more work is still needed to cut back on low-value care.

CBSSM Seminar: Jan Van den Bulck, PhD

Tue, November 28, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Jan Van den Bulck, PhD
Professor, Communication Studies

Topic:
"Are the media (re-)defining how we interact with each other and with the world?

We know everything there is to know about people we have never even met. Through social media, we follow their every move. We even know their pets. Our media use interferes with healthy sleep, family meals, or even our work. Our children need levels of self-control to manage distractions that threaten their schoolwork. Or do they?"

Tue, November 28, 2017

In a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, Jeff Kullgren and co-authors found that few individuals enrolled in High-Deductible Health Plans (HDHPs) in the United States are engaging in consumer behaviors.

Carl Schneider, JD

Faculty

Carl E. Schneider is the Chauncey Stillman Professor for Ethics, Morality, and the Practice of Law and is a Professor of Internal Medicine. He was educated at Harvard College and the University of Michigan Law School, where he was editor in chief of the Michigan Law Review. He served as law clerk to Judge Carl McGowan of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and to Justice Potter Stewart of the United States Supreme Court. He became a member of the Law School faculty in 1981 and of the Medical School faculty in 1998. 

Last Name: 
Schneider

Funded by VA Health Services Research and Development Career Development Award

Funding Years: 2015-2019

Heart attack and stroke, which together are called cardiovascular disease, cause over 1/3 of all deaths in VA patients. The current guidelines for the prevention of these conditions focus on lowering patients'blood pressure and cholesterol levels. A new treatment strategy, which I call benefit-based tailored treatment, that instead guides treatment decisions based on the likelihood that a medication would prevent a heart attack or stroke could prevent more cardiovascular disease, with lower medication use, and be more patient centered. The purpose of this Career Development Award is to develop and assess tools and approaches that could enable the implementation of benefit-based tailored treatment of cardiovascular disease, in particular a decision support tool and educational program for clinicians and a performance profiling system. The decision support tool will enable better care by showing clinicians patient-specific estimates of the likelihood that their medication decisions will prevent a cardiovascular disease event. The performance profiling system will encourage better care by assessing the quality of care provided at VA sites and in PACT teams based on how well the medical care provided follows this treatment strategy. The project will have three aims:
Aim 1 : In the first aim, I will seek to understand clinicians' and patients' perceptions of and receptivity to the use of benefit-based tailored treatment for cardiovascular disease. Information gained from qualitative research with clinicians will help assess and improve the usability and effectiveness of the decision support tool and educational program for clinicians, along with the acceptability of the treatment strategies in general. Information gained from focus groups with patients will help learn their priorities in cardiovascular disease prevention, to help identify ways to make the interventions and their assessments more patient-centered.
Aim 2 : In the second aim, the decision support tool and educational program will be assessed in a real-world randomized pilot study involving thirty clinicians. Half of the clinicians will be provided the decision support tool and education intervention for ten patients each, the other half will receive a traditional quality improvement program and treatment reminders. The study will have formative goals of ensuring that clinicians and patients believe the tool is valuable and does not disrupt care processes or workflow for anyone in the PACT team. This will be studied with qualitative and survey assessments. The primary summative outcome will be the influence of the intervention on clinicians'treatment decisions. Secondary outcomes will assess patients'satisfaction with their visits and their clinicians.
Aim 3 : The third aim will develop and evaluate a novel performance measurement system based on benefit- based tailored treatment. First, the performance profiling system will be developed. Then the profiling system's ability to reliably differentiate high quality from low-quality care will be evaluated.

PI: Jeremy Sussman

Funded by: NIH

Funding Years: 2016-2021

 

There is a fundamental gap in understanding how Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) influences treatment and Decision Making for serious illnesses, like Cardiovascular disease (CVD), in older patients. Poor understanding of Clinical Decision Making is a critical barrier to the design of interventions to improve the quality and outcomes of CVD care of in older patients with MCI. The long-term goal of this research is to develop, test, and disseminate interventions aimed to improve the quality and outcomes of CVD care and to reduce CVD-related disability in older Americans with MCI. The objective of this application is to determine the extent to which people with MCI are receiving sub-standard care for the two most common CVD events, Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and acute ischemic stroke, increasing the chance of mortality and morbidity in a population with otherwise good quality of life, and to determine how MCI influences patient preferences and physician recommendations for treatment. AMI and acute ischemic stroke are excellent models of serious, acute illnesses with a wide range of effective therapies for acute management, Rehabilitation, and secondary prevention. Our central hypothesis is that older Adults with MCI are undertreated for CVD because patients and physicians overestimate their risk of dementia and underestimate their risk of CVD. This hypothesis has been formulated on the basis of preliminary data from the applicants' pilot research. The rationale for the proposed research is that understanding how patient preferences and physician recommendations contribute to underuse of CVD treatments in patients with MCI has the potential to translate into targeted interventions aimed to improve the quality and outcomes of care, resulting in new and innovative approaches to the treatment of CVD and other serious, acute illnesses in Adults with MCI. Guided by strong preliminary data, this hypothesis will be tested by pursuing two specific aims: 1) Compare AMI and stroke treatments between MCI patients and cognitively normal patients and explore differences in Clinical outcomes associated with treatment differences; and 2) Determine the influence of MCI on patient and surrogate preferences and physician recommendations for AMI and stroke treatment. Under the first aim, a health services research approach- shown to be feasible in the applicants' hands-will be used to quantify the extent and outcomes of treatment differences for AMI and acute ischemic stroke in older patients with MCI. Under the second aim, a multi-center, mixed-methods approach and a national physician survey, which also has been proven as feasible in the applicants' hands, will be used to determine the influence of MCI on patient preferences and physician recommendations for AMI and stroke treatment. This research proposal is innovative because it represents a new and substantially different way of addressing the important public health problem of enhancing the health of older Adults by determining the extent and causes of underuse of effective CVD treatments in those with MCI. The proposed research is significant because it is expected to vertically advance and expand understanding of how MCI influences treatment and Decision Making for AMI and ischemic stroke in older patients. Ultimately, such knowledge has the potential to inform the development of targeted interventions that will help to improve the quality and outcomes of CVD care and to reduce CVD-related disability in older Americans.

PI: Deborah Levine

CO(s): Darin Zahuranec, MD & Ken Langa, MD, PhD

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