Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query news events news 2017 02 07.

Page not found

You are here

Jacquelyn Miller, MA

Research Associate

Jackie re-joined CBSSM in spring of 2017. She currently works with Drs. Lesly Dossett and Tom Valley on projects related to the worries and concerns of those with loved ones in the ICU, feedback and disclosure of errors that have occurred in other hospital systems, and opioid prescribing after cancer surgery. She has a BS in Environmental Policy and Developing Country Studies (University of Michigan, School of Natural Resources and Environment) and a MA in Sociology, specializing in environmental justice, feminist sociology, and science and technology studies (Michigan State University).

Last Name: 
Miller

Teach-Out Course: Reach Out and RELATE: Communicating and Understanding Scientific Research

Fri, May 05, 2017, 8:00am
Location: 
Online

About this course
Everyone - non-scientists and scientists alike - has some form of expertise, but communicating across a gap in knowledge or experience is challenging. In this Teach-Out, we address this challenge by helping participants to develop core communication skills and more effectively communicate with one another. For more information or to enroll, click here.

What you'll learn

  • Understand why science communication is both important and challenging
  • Develop strategies to effectively bridge communications between public audiences and scientific researchers
  • Understand expert perspectives on different areas of public engagement with science
  • Shape a compelling, message-focused STEM narrative for a specific audience
  • Discuss important issues in science communication with others


Meet the instructors

Elyse L. Aurbach PhD
Co-Founder and Co-Director of RELATE

Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher PhD
Associate Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education

Brandon Patterson MS
Co-Director of RELATE

Katherine E. Prater PhD
Co-Founder and Co-Director of RELATE
 

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, March 22, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Autumn Fiester, PhD, Division of Medical Ethics, Department of Medical Ethics & Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania

Title –  The “Difficult” Patient Reconceived: Learning the Skills of Mediators in Managing Challenging Clinical Encounters.

Abstract: Between 15%-60% of patients are considered “difficult” by their treating physicians.  Patient psychiatric pathology is the conventional explanation for why patients are deemed “difficult.” But the prevalence of the problem suggests the possibility of a less pathological cause.  I argue that the phenomenon can be better explained as responses sourced in conflicts related to healthcare delivery and that the solution to the “difficult patient” is to teach better conflict management skills to clinical providers.


Objectives:

1. Apply the mediator's concepts of "positions" and "interests" to patient-provider conflicts
2. Identity the moral emotions and explain their significance in managing the "difficult" patient
3. Learn seven maxims for diffusing conflict in clinical encounters

Available via live stream at: https://connect.umms.med.umich.edu/bioethics_3_22_17

Mon, April 17, 2017

A new piece by Brian Zikmund-Fisher and former CBSSM post-doc, Laura Scherer is out in the Conversation, "Maximizers vs. minimizers: The personality trait that may guide your medical decisions – and costs." They developed and validated a 10-item questionnaire that assesses a person’s maximizing or minimizing tendencies on a scale, from one (strong minimizing) to seven (strong maximizing). Across four studies, they found this difference predicts health care use across a range of medical interventions and health problems, from cancer screening preferences to vaccination. They hope that identifying variations in maximizing or minimizing tendencies may be useful in trying to address both overuse and underuse in health care.

Research Topics: 
Mon, April 17, 2017

Brian Zikmund-Fisher is quoted in a recent MarketWatch article, "How doctors are getting patients more involved in their own care." Dr. Zikmund-Fisher points out, "Patients are often overwhelmed by massive amounts of data they now have access to. The easier we make it for them to understand, the more likely it is they will use it and the less time the doctor has to spend explaining it.” The article goes on to cite a web-based application developed by Dr. Zikmund-Fisher and colleagues that allows health-care providers and researchers to create graphics that use icons in arrays that show risk information in ways that make it easier for people to grasp information.

A study by former CBSSM Co-Director, Angela Fagerlin, is also cited in the article.

"Concussion" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Thu, March 30, 2017, 7:00pm
Location: 
Forum Hall, Palmer Commons

"Concussion" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Free Admission

Moderator:    Raymond De Vries, PhD

Panelists:    

  • Ellen Arruda, PhD, Professor, Mechanical Engineering
  • Karen Kelly-Blake, PhD, Assistant Professor, Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences, MSU
  • Matthew Lorincz, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Neurology, Co-Director, Michigan NeuroSport

Refreshments provided.

Join us for a free screening of the award-winning film, Concussion. Watch the true story of Dr. Bennet Omalu, renowned forensic pathologist who discovered chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), acclaimed as, "a gripping medical mystery and a dazzling portrait of the young scientist no one wanted to listen to." 

The film will be followed by a panel discussion related to key bioethical and scientific issues brought up by the film, as well as current research into brain injury and brain injury prevention.

Reach Out and RELATE: Communicating and Understanding Scientific Research


About this course
Everyone - non-scientists and scientists alike - has some form of expertise, but communicating across a gap in knowledge or experience is challenging. In this Teach-Out, we address this challenge by helping participants to develop core communication skills and more effectively communicate with one another. For more information or to enroll, click here.

What you'll learn

  •     Understand why science communication is both important and challenging
  •     Develop strategies to effectively bridge communications between public audiences and scientific researchers
  •     Understand expert perspectives on different areas of public engagement with science
  •     Shape a compelling, message-focused STEM narrative for a specific audience
  •     Discuss important issues in science communication with others


Meet the instructors

Elyse L. Aurbach PhD
Co-Founder and Co-Director of RELATE

Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher PhD
Associate Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education

Brandon Patterson MS
Co-Director of RELATE

Katherine E. Prater PhD
Co-Founder and Co-Director of RELATE

Click here for more information.

CBSSM Seminar: Julie Wright Nunes, MD, MPH

Wed, May 17, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Julie Wright Nunes, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine

Title: Patient Education and Care: Challenges and Opportunities in Chronic Kidney Disease

Abstract: Twenty million people, or 20% of U.S. adults ages 60 and older, have chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD is a significant public health threat carrying high risk of morbidity, mortality, and renal failure. Health behavior theory suggests that patient motivation and healthy behavior change require patients to have knowledge of their chronic condition, as well as the self-efficacy and skills to do what is needed to stay healthy. The chronic care model promotes early patient engagement in care. Yet, less than 20% of  patients with CKD are aware of their diagnosis. Even patients who are aware often do not understand the implications of their CKD diagnosis or what they need to do to optimize their health. Dr. Wright Nunes will discuss her research aimed to develop, test, and disseminate sustainable patient-centric education and coaching support interventions to improve quality of care and outcomes in patients who have CKD.

Bioethics Grand Rounds -Anna Kirkland, JD, PhD

Wed, June 28, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Auditorium

Anna Kirkland, JD, PhD Title –  "The Vaccine Injury Compensation Court and Its Critics"

Presenter –  Anna Kirkland, JD, PhD, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Women's Studies and Political Science, University of Michigan

Abstract: The so-called vaccine court is a small special court in the United States Court of Federal Claims that handles controversial claims that a vaccine has harmed someone. The government steps in as the defendant and vaccine manufacturers are protected from liability. In this court, lawyers, activists, judges, doctors, and scientists come together, sometimes arguing bitterly, trying to figure out whether a vaccine really caused a person’s medical problem. Drawing on her recently published book, Vaccine Court: The Law and Politics of Injury (NYU Press, 2016), Prof. Anna Kirkland will discuss the ethical controversies surrounding the vaccine court, from the perspective of anti-vaccine movement activists as well as from the mainstream.

In videos for The Trust Project, bioethicist and sociologist Raymond De Vries explores trust in medicine from a sociological perspective.

In How Trust Shapes the Medical Field: A Sociologist's Perspective, De Vries offers a historical perspective on trust in medicine:

  • What role did industrialization play in changing interpersonal trust?
  • What can we learn about trusting relationships from past societies?

In The Rise of Bioethics in Response to Medical Distrust: Key Findings, De Vries discusses some key research in the field of trust and bioethics:

  • How did the erosion of trust in medicine lead to the rise in the study of bioethics?
  • Does the bureaucracy that comes with research ethics committees enhance or undermine trust?

An another video, Evolution of Trust in Bioethics medical research ethics.

The Trust Project at Northwestern University features scholars and executives exploring Trust in videos that cover theory, research and practice. By combining multiple and diverse perspectives, The Trust Project aspires to illuminate new insights for research and management.

Pages