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CBSSM Faculty, Kayte Spector-Bagdady, Ray De Vries, and Lisa Harris, along with Lisa Low recently co-authored a Hastings Center Report article, "Stemming the Standard-of-Care Sprawl" about clinician self-interest and the case of electronic fetal monitoring.

Link to article here.

Research Topics: 

Funded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Funding Years: 2014 - 2016.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Michigan has established a rigorous curriculum, with enhanced and mentored research practicum and exciting opportunities to engage in community-based and partnered participatory research. The curriculum is based on adult learning theory and integrates research theory and practical applications. This curriculum will fulfill requirements for a Master's Degree in Health and Health Care Research, a degree program that was designed specifically to meet the needs of the Clinical Scholars at the University of Michigan. These above courses make up the central components of the first year of Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Michigan. The second year of the Clinical Scholars Program is primarily devoted to research, with the Scholars' Research Committee continuing as an advisory committee. Education in the second year focuses more closely to each Scholar's specific needs. In the second year the Scholars also participate in a "Work-in-Progress Seminar" led by one of the Program Directors. Throughout all years of the program, Scholars participate in the Clinical Scholars noon health Seminar. This is a weekly 1.5 hour seminar which will alternate between presentation of research findings by Scholars, faculty, or invited guests, and presentations about health policy by Michigan faculty and invited guests. All Scholars are expected to attend the seminar each week, as well as the CSP Leadership, most Core Faculty, and selected guests.

PI(s): Rodney Hayward

Co-I(s): Matthew Davis, Gary Freed, Mary Ellen Heisler, Timothy Hofer, Joel Howell, Theodore Iwashyna, Eve Kerr, Joyce Lee, Richard Lichtenstein, Laurence McMahon Jr, Caroline Richardson, Mary AM Rogers, Sanjay Saint, Antonius Tsai, Michael Volk, Sara Waber

Funded by National Institutes of Health; National Institute on Aging

Funding Years; 2011-2016

A cornerstone of the nation's social science research infrastructure, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. families. Begun in 1968, 36 waves of data have now been collected on PSID families and their descendents. Its long-term measures of economic and social wellbeing have spurred researchers and policy makers to attend to the fundamental dynamism inherent in social and behavioral processes. The PSID is increasingly being used to answer innovative social and behavioral research questions in the context of an aging society. This application proposes to collect, process, and disseminate three modules in the 2013 and 2015 waves of the PSID: 1. Health module: Including 15 minutes of survey questions on health status, health behaviors, health insurance coverage & health care costs. Linkages to the National Death Index and Medicare will be extended; 2. Wealth module: Including 10 minutes of survey questions on wealth, active savings, and pensions. Linkage to Social Security earnings and benefits records for active sample and decedents will be undertaken for the first time, and a new module to minimize errors in reports of wealth changes will be developed and implemented; and 3. Wellbeing module with related psychosocial measures: We will design and implement a mixed-mode (web/mail out) questionnaire to collect content from both respondents and spouses about their wellbeing and related psychosocial measures (e.g., personality, intelligence), with an experiment to identify (and allow researchers to adjust for if necessary) mode effects. After collection, the data will be processed and distributed in the PSID Online Data Center, which will allow users to create customized extracts and codebooks using a cross-year variable index.

PI(s): Robert Schoeni

Co-I(s): Charles Brown, James House, Mick Couper

H. Myra Kim, ScD

Faculty

H. Myra Kim is a Research Scientist at the Center for Statistical Consultation and Research and and Adjunct Professor at the Department of Biostatistics. She received her Sc.D. in Biostatistics from Harvard University in 1995 and worked at Brown University as an Assistant Professor from 1995 to 1997. She has worked at UM since 1997 and has collaborated with various researchers from around the UM community as well as from other universities.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Kim

2016 CBSSM Research Colloquium and Bishop Lecture (William Dale, MD, PhD)

Wed, April 27, 2016, 8:30am
Location: 
Founders Room, Alumni Center, 200 Fletcher St., Ann Arbor, MI

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) Research Colloquium was held Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at the Founders Room, Alumni Center, 200 Fletcher Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium featured the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  William Dale, MD, PhD presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: "Why Do We So Often Overtreat, Undertreat, and Mistreat Older Adults with Cancer?"

William Dale, MD, PhD is Associate Professor of Medicine and Chief, Section of Geriatrics & Palliative Medicine & Director, SOCARE Clinic at the University of Chicago. A geriatrician with a doctorate in health policy and extensive experience in oncology, Dr. Dale has devoted his career to the care of older adults with cancer -- particularly prostate cancer. Dr. Dale has a special interest in the identification and treatment of vulnerable older patients who have complex medical conditions, including cancer. He is actively researching the interactions of cancer therapies with changes associated with aging.

 

The 2016 Research Colloquium Presentation Schedule:

  •     8:30 AM -- Check in & refreshments
  •     9:00 AM -- Welcome
  •     9:05 AM -- Katrina Hauschildt, MA, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology: "Language and Communication as Professionalization Projects in Clinical Ethics Consultation"
  •     9:30 AM -- Devan Stahl, PhD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Ethics, MSU: "Is there a right not to know?"
  •     9:55 AM -- Chithra Perumalswami, MD MSc, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Veterans Affairs Clinical Scholar: "Insurance Status of Elderly Americans and Location of Death"
  •     10:20 AM -- Break
  •     10:35 AM -- William Dale, MD, PhD, 2016 Bishop Lecture in Bioethics: "Why Do We So Often Overtreat, Undertreat, and Mistreat Older Adults with Cancer?"
  •     12:00 PM -- Lunch
  •     12:45 PM -- Lauren B. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor, Department of Pathology/Ginny Sheffield, UM Medical Student (M3): "Special treatment for the VIP patient:  Is it ethical?  Is it dangerous?"
  •     1:10 PM -- Naomi Laventhal, MD, MA, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases: "Roman Charity Redux: The Moral Obligations of the Breastfeeding Physician"
  •     1:35 PM -- Archana Bharadwaj, Graduate Student, UM School of Public Health: "Patient understanding and satisfaction regarding the clinical use of whole genome sequencing: Findings from the MedSeq Project"
  •     2:00 PM -- Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD, MBioethics, CBSSM Postdoctoral Research Fellow: "Direct‐to‐Consumer Biobanking"
  •     2:25 PM -- Break
  •     2:40 PM --Panel Presentation (Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA & colleagues) : "Community engagement in setting research priorities: Representation, Participation and Evaluation"
    • Why (and how) was CBPR supported in DECIDERS?
    • How were communities represented in DECIDERS decision making?
    • Why and how was the partnership evaluated?
    • How were the 47 focus groups engaged in setting research priorities?
Tue, January 10, 2017

Jeffrey Kullgren was recently featured in the Michigan Medicine article, "What do health plan deductibles really mean for people with chronic illness? New study takes a look." Dr. Kullgren co-authored a JAMA Internal Medicine Research Letter, which reports that even “low” deductible plans can mean high out-of-pocket costs for many Americans.

CBSSM Seminar: Dina Hafez Griauzde, MD

Wed, January 18, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Dina Hafez Griauzde, MD
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar
VA Special Fellow, Ann Arbor Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center
Clinical Lecturer, Internal Medicine

Abstract: Greater purpose in life (measured using a validated scale)  is associated with lower rates of certain chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease and stroke.  In this seminar, we will discuss the role of purpose in life in the development of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes as well as the potential to augment ongoing type 2 diabetes prevention efforts with strategies that promote greater purpose in life.

Raymond De Vries is involved in a new research study led by Akbar Waljee, MD, MSc, which will develop a risk-based strategy to help providers tailor timing of treatments among CHC Veterans to ensure that those who most need urgent therapy get it as quickly as possible.

Using democratic deliberation, Dr. De Vries will engage Veterans to learn their thoughts and preferences about such a strategy, which will help with its implementation in a clinical setting.

Click here for more details.

Mon, January 30, 2017

Brian Zikmund-Fisher's The Conversation piece on raw cookie dough was cited in the Popular Science Health article, "The Chemicals In Burnt Toast And Crispy Fries Won't Kill You, But The Calories Might."

Mon, January 30, 2017

Kayte Spector-Bagdady has a new commentary out in The Conversation about the law and ethics of research with human biospecimens. It focuses on the recently published revisions to the human subjects research regulations, highlights the debate that ensued from a draft version over its proposal to include nonidentified biospecimens in its definition of "human subject," and summarizes where the final rule landed and possible steps going forward.

Research Topics: 

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