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CBSSM Working Group Meeting-Joy Chang, MD

Tue, October 09, 2018, 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC bldg 16 266C

Joy Chang, MD, Gastroenterology Fellow, will be seeking feedback on a web-based patient survey. The survey is to get an idea of how patients make decisions around treatment for eosinophilic esophagiti

On Thursday, March 22,3:30-4:45, at the School of Public Health (SPH I, Rm 1655), we are pleased to announce that Amy McGuire, JD, PhD, of Baylor College of Medicine will give a talk entitled, “Biobanking and Genomic Research: Ethical Challenges and Policy Implications." Dr. McGuire is Associate Professor of Medicine andMedical Ethics and Associate Director of Research at the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine.  Her research focuses on legal and ethical issues in genomics.  She is currently studying participant attitudes toward genomic data sharing, investigators' practices and perspectives on the return of genetic research results, ethical issues in human microbiome research, and ethical and policy issues related to theclinical integration of genomics.  Her research is funded by the NIH-NHGRI and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.  The talk is co-sponsored by the School of Public Health and will be followed by a reception.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium will be held Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at the Founders Room, Alumni Center, 200 Fletcher Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium will feature the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  This year CBSSM is delighted to announce that William Dale, MD, PhD will present the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: "Why Do We So Often Overtreat, Undertreat, and Mistreat Older Adults with Cancer?"

William Dale, MD, PhD is Associate Professor of Medicine and Chief, Section of Geriatrics & Palliative Medicine & Director, SOCARE Clinic at the University of Chicago. A geriatrician with a doctorate in health policy and extensive experience in oncology, Dr. Dale has devoted his career to the care of older adults with cancer -- particularly prostate cancer. Dr. Dale has a special interest in the identification and treatment of vulnerable older patients who have complex medical conditions, including cancer. He is actively researching the interactions of cancer therapies with changes associated with aging.

Abstract submissions are welcome from all disciplines both within UM, as well as other institutions.

Click here for more details.

 

Tanner Caverly and colleagues performed a systematic review to determine how U.S. cancer prevention and screening recommendations present the potential benefits and harms associated with the procedures. They found that 69% of recommendation statements either did not quantify benefits and harms or presented them in an asymmetric manner. They conclude that improved presentation of benefits and harms in guidelines would better ensure that clinicians and patients have access to the information required for making informed decisions.

Caverly TJ, Hayward RA, Reamer E, Zikmund-Fisher BJ, Connochie 2, Heisler M, Fagerlin A. Presentation of Benefits and Harms in US Cancer Screening and Prevention Guidelines: Systematic Review. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2016 Feb 24;108(6). pii: djv436. doi: 10.1093/jnci/djv436.
 

Research Topics: 
Tue, January 03, 2017

Reshma Jagsi was lead author on a recent study that found many patients with breast cancer unnecessarily choose double mastectomy. This study found that many patients consider contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), but their knowledge about the procedure is low and discussions with surgeons appear to be incomplete. CPM use is substantial among patients without clinical indications but is lower when patients report that their surgeon recommended against it. The study authors stress that more effective physician-patient communication about CPM is needed to reduce potential overtreatment.

CBSSM faculty, Sarah Hawley, was a co-author on this study.

In videos for The Trust Project, bioethicist and sociologist Raymond De Vries explores trust in medicine from a sociological perspective.

In How Trust Shapes the Medical Field: A Sociologist's Perspective, De Vries offers a historical perspective on trust in medicine:

  • What role did industrialization play in changing interpersonal trust?
  • What can we learn about trusting relationships from past societies?

In The Rise of Bioethics in Response to Medical Distrust: Key Findings, De Vries discusses some key research in the field of trust and bioethics:

  • How did the erosion of trust in medicine lead to the rise in the study of bioethics?
  • Does the bureaucracy that comes with research ethics committees enhance or undermine trust?

An another video, Evolution of Trust in Bioethics medical research ethics.

The Trust Project at Northwestern University features scholars and executives exploring Trust in videos that cover theory, research and practice. By combining multiple and diverse perspectives, The Trust Project aspires to illuminate new insights for research and management.

CBSSM Seminar: Timothy R. B. Johnson, M.D.

Tue, October 03, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 10, G065

Timothy R. B. Johnson, M.D.
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Bates Professor of the Diseases of Women and Children
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Women’s Studies
Research Professor, CHGD

Title: Global Health Ethics and Reproductive Justice: Breadth and Depth in CBSSM

Global Health Ethics and Reproductive Justice (in this instance sexual rights and gender equity, specifically gender and sexual harassment/assault in Academic Medical Centers) appear to be areas where a number of CBSSM members have interest, expertise and are working inter-disciplinarily in domains that will differentiate CBSSM nationally and internationally. Could and should these develop into CBSSM thematic interests? Whatever the case, they will remain topics of significant interest across CBSSM and are worthy of broad discussion and  understanding.

The novelty of risk and vaccination intentions (May-12)

It's 2009.  Early in the year, a 9-year-old girl from California became the first person with a confirmed case of H1N1 ("swine") influenza in the United States.  Shortly thereafter, the U.S. declared a public health emergency and the World Health Organization declared a phase 6 pandemic (the highest level possible).  By September 2009 a vaccination was developed and was available within a month.

You've been following the news about the H1N1 influenza as developments have unfolded throughout the year, and you feel some concern.  You have been wondering about the risk of coming down with the H1N1 flu yourself and have been thinking about whether you should be vaccinated. 

Thu, May 26, 2011

Raymond De Vries was appointed Professor of Midwifery Science at the University of Maastricht (Netherlands) in November 2010.  As is the custom in European universities, he delivered an inaugural lecture, outlining the educational and research goals of his professorship on May 26, 2011.  It was preceded by a research symposium focusing on risk in maternity care, with speakers exploring the way risk is measured and used by care providers and the way pregnant women respond to assessments of risk they are given. Click here to view a video of his inaugural address, which is in English. Click here for a news article about Dr. De Vries, in Dutch.

Raymond De Vries is co-author on a new publication in Academic Medicine, highlighting a successful model for collaboration which was developed in the early phases of a grant funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation nearly five years ago. The Collaborative Health Alliance for Reshaping Training, Education, and Research (CHARTER) project expanded the partnerships between the University of Michigan and several Ghanaian academic institutions to enhance health care provider education and build and/or increase research capacity. One of the early goals of the grant was to establish guiding principles for engagement through a Charter of Collaboration.


Read more about the partnership through UMHS News and the origional PubMed article.

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