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Thu, December 20, 2007

A CBSSM study found that colostomy patients who felt that their condition was irreversible reported better quality of life than those who hoped that they would be cured. For a summary, see this press release and video. The researchers are Dylan M. Smith, PhD; Peter A. Ubel, MD; Aleksandra Jankovic, MS (all at the University of Michigan); and George Loewenstein, PhD, (of Carnegie Mellon University). Health Psychology will publish the article in mid-November 2009.

Press coverage of this research has been extensive. Peter Bregman reported on the study in the July 2009 Business Week Online, applying the concepts to help people manage their stressful and unpredictable lives. Read his full article here. Preliminary data from this study were cited in the 7th Annual “Year in Ideas” issue of the New York Times Magazine in December 2007. Read recent international media coverage:
US News and World Report Health Day
Voice of America Radio
Daily Mail UK
Reuters India

The Privileged Choices (Jan-08)

What's the difference between opting in and opting out of an activity? Who decides if people will be put automatically into one category or another? Click this interactive decision to learn how default options work.

Scenario 1

Imagine that you're a US Senator and that you serve on the Senate's Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. The Infectious Diseases Society of America has come before your committee because they believe that too many health care workers are getting sick with influenza ("flu") each year and infecting others. As a result, your Senate committee is now considering a new bill that would require that all health care workers get annual influenza vaccinations ("flu shots") unless the worker specifically refuses this vaccination in writing.

Do you think you would support this bill for mandatory flu shots for health care workers?

  • Yes
  • No

Scenario 2

Imagine that you're the human resources director at a mid-sized company that's initiating an employee retirement plan. Management is concerned that many employees are not saving enough for retirement. They're considering a policy that would automatically deduct retirement contributions from all employees' wages unless the employee fills out and submits a form requesting exemption from the automatic deductions.

Do you think a policy of automatic retirement deductions is reasonable for your company to follow?

  • Yes 
  • No

Scenario 3

Organ transplants save many lives each year, but there are always too many deserving patients and too few organs available. To try to improve the number of organs available for donation, the state legislature in your state is considering a new policy that all people who die under certain well-defined circumstances will have their organs donated to others. The system would start in three years, after an information campaign. People who do not want to have their organs donated would be given the opportunity to sign a refusal of organ donation when they renewed their drivers' licenses or state ID cards, which expire every three years. Citizens without either of these cards could also sign the refusal at any drivers' license office in the state. This is a policy similar to ones already in place in some European countries.

Does this seem like an appropriate policy to you?

  • Yes 
  • No

How do your answers compare?

For many decisions in life, people encounter default options-that is, events or conditions that will be set in place if they don't actively choose an alternative. Some default options have clear benefits and are relatively straightforward to implement, such as having drug prescriptions default to "generic" unless the physician checks the "brand necessary" box. Others are more controversial, such as the automatic organ donation issue that you made a decision about.

Default options can strongly influence human behavior. For example, employees are much more likely to participate in a retirement plan if they're automatically enrolled (and must ask to be removed, or opt out) than if they must actively opt in to the plan. Researchers have found a number of reasons for this influence of default options, including people's aversion to change.

But default options can seem coercive also. So, an Institute of Medicine committee recently recommended against making organ donation automatic in the US. One reason was the committee's concern that Americans might not fully understand that they could opt out of donation or exactly how they could do so.

The policy scenarios presented to you here have been excerpted from a 2007 article in the New England Journal of Medicine titled "Harnessing the Power of Default Options to Improve Health Care," by Scott D. Halpern, MD, PhD, Peter A. Ubel, MD, and David A. Asch, MD, MBA. Dr. Ubel is the Director of the Center for Behavioral and Decision Sciences in Medicine.

This article provides guidance for policy-makers in setting default options, specifically in health care. Generally, default options in health care are intended to promote the use of interventions that improve care, reduce the use of interventions that put patients at risk, or serve broader societal agendas, such as cost containment.

In this NEJM article, the researchers argue that default options are often unavoidable-otherwise, how would an emergency-room physician decide on care for an uninsured patient? Many default options already exist but are hidden. Without either returning to an era of paternalism in medicine or adopting a laissez-faire approach, the authors present ways to use default options wisely but actively, based on clear findings in the medical literature.

Some examples of default policies that may improve health care quality:

  • routine HIV testing of all patients unless they opt out.
  • removal of urinary catheters in hospital patients after 72 hours unless a nurse or doctor documents why the catheter should be retained.
  • routine ventilation of all newly intubated patients with lung-protective settings unless or until other settings are ordered.

Drs. Halpern, Ubel, and Asch conclude, "Enacting policy changes by manipulating default options carries no more risk than ignoring such options that were previously set passively, and it offers far greater opportunities for benefit."

Read the article:

Harnessing the power of default options to improve health care.
Halpern SD, Ubel PA, Asch DA. New England Journal of Medicine 2007;357:1340-1344.

Andrew Shuman, MD

Faculty

Andrew G. Shuman, MD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School.  He is also the Chief of the ENT Section of the Surgery Service at the VA Ann Arbor Health System.  He is a service chief of the Clinical Ethics Service in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM).  His current research interests explore ethical issues involved in caring for patients with head and neck cancer, and in managing clinical ethics consultations among patients with cancer.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Shuman

Lewis Morgenstern, MD

Is it disgusting? (May-08)

People vary in their attitudes toward physical disabilities. Give us your reactions, and we'll tell you the results of surveys of the general public--and of actual patients.

 

Strongly

disagree

Mildly

disagree

Mildly

agree

Strongly

agree

I try to avoid letting any part of my body touch the toilet seat in a public restroom, even when it appears clean.

1

2

3

4

It would make me uncomfortable to hear a couple making love in the next room of a hotel.

1

2

3

4

It would bother me tremendously to touch a dead body.

1

2

3

4

Even if I were hungry, I would not eat a bowl of my favorite soup if it had been stirred by a used-but thoroughly washed- fly-swatter

1

2

3

4

I am bothered by the odor caused by passing gas.

1

2

3

4

The smell of other persons' bowel movements disgusts me.

1

2

3

4

Consider the following

Now we'd like you to think about a specific health condition. Please read this scenario carefully so that you can answer some questions. Imagine you have a colostomy. A colostomy is an operation involving the surgical redirection of your bowels through a hole created in your gut. This hole is called a stoma. Waste passes through your intestines and out the stoma into a bag, which you must empty several times a day. If you wear relatively loose clothing, this bag won't be visible underneath your garments. Occasionally, you'll experience odors and noises caused by gas and waste passing through the stoma into the bag. There's also the chance that the colostomy bag may leak if it's allowed to fill past capacity. Although you'll be restricted from lifting very heavy objects, your daily activities won't otherwise be greatly affected by the colostomy.

To what extent does your colostomy make you feel embarrassed or socially uncomfortable?
Not at all 1       2       3       4       5       6       7       8       9        10 Very Much
 
To what extent does your colostomy make you feel stigmatized?
Not at all 1       2       3       4       5       6       7       8       9        10 Very Much
 

How do your answers compare?

Do your responses to the six questions on the disgust scale correlate with the stigmatization you expressed related to your imaginary colostomy?

In their national survey of the general public (people without colostomies), CBDSM researchers found that people who reported a higher level of disgust sensitivity responded more negatively to colostomy.

Current and former colostomy patients were also surveyed. In these groups, patients with higher disgust sensitivity had more difficulty adjusting to life with a colostomy. Specifically,colostomy patients with higher disgust sensitivity felt more stigmatized in society by their colostomy and felt more bothered by colostomy symptoms, such as leakage. Dr. Dylan Smith and his colleagues postulate that people who have a pre-existing high sensitivity to disgusting stimuli will be less likely to adjust well to life with a colostomy. Alternatively, it could be that people who adjust successfully to a colostomy do so in part by reducing their sensitivity to certain kinds of disgusting stimuli.

If future studies show that we can predict that patients with high disgust sensitivity are likely to have more difficulty adjusting to a colostomy, health-care teams can then seek ways to de-sensitize responses to bowel functioning, in order to aid patients in their adaptation to life with a colostomy. Further, many people with inflammatory bowel syndrome can choose whether or not to have a colostomy for relief of their symptoms. For these patients, a clear understanding of disgust sensitivity could be a factor in helping to make an informed choice about elective colostomy.

Certainly this research suggests that disgust plays a role in perceived and actual stigmatization of disabled patients. Previous studies of patients' adjustment to disability have focused on general responses to adversity, taking into account their social support, their coping style, or their optimism, for example. The uniqueness of this recent CBDSM study is that it considers how the specific challenges of a disability interact with a personality trait relevant to that disability: disgust sensitivity. This personality trait might also be linked to other health conditions, such as amputation or incontinence. In addition, personality traits other than disgust might affect patients' adaptation to other disabilities.

Read the article:

Sensitivity to disgust, stigma, and adjustment to life with a colostomy
Smith DM, Loewenstein G, Rozin P, Sherriff RL, Ubel PA. Journal of Research in Personality 2007;41(4):787–803.

The Disgust Scale used here is adapted from the work of Haidt J, McCauley C, Rozin P. Individual differences in sensitivity to disgust: A scale sampling seven domains of disgust elicitors. Personality and Individual Differences. 1994; 16(5): 701-713.

 

Sarah Hawley, PhD, MPH

Faculty

Dr. Sarah T. Hawley is a Professor in the Division of General Medicine at the University of Michigan and a Research Investigator at the Ann Arbor VA Center of Excellence in Health Services Research & Development. She holds a PhD in health services research from the University of North Carolina and an MPH from Yale University Department of Public Health. Her primary research is in decision making related to cancer prevention and control, particularly among racial/ethnic minority and underserved populations.

Last Name: 
Hawley
Press Coverage: 
Tue, May 07, 2013

Dr. Kathryn Moseley was recently quoted in a Detroit Free Press article, "Proposed law would force hospitals to tell when care won't be given." 

Research Topics: 

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2013 - 2015.

With the aging of society and restructuring of families, it is increasingly important to understand how individuals become disabled. New disability is associated with increased mortality, substantial increases in medical costs (often borne by public payers), and a heavy burden on families and caregivers. While the disablement process?as theorized by Verburgge & Jette and their successors?has traditionally been seen as chronic and gradual, there is increasing recognition that acute events play a critical role in disability. Medical illnesses are not the only potentially disabling events. NIA & NINR recently posted PA-11-265, calling for ?Social and Behavioral Research on the Elderly in Disasters? in recognition that natural disasters are common, but we know little about their impact on health and disability. The National Research Council?s Committee on Population published a report in 2009 documenting not only our ignorance in this area, but, importantly, the potential value of studying disasters to understand fundamental processes in disability and health.
Our long-term research agenda is (a) to test the hypothesis that natural disasters cause enduring morbidity for survivors that is not fully addressed by existing health and welfare programs, and (b) to discover remediable mechanisms that generate that enduring morbidity. Here we propose a nationwide test of the association of living in a disaster area with individuals? long-term disability and health care use. To perform this test, we will combine the unique longitudinal resources of over 16,000 respondents in the linked Health and Retirement Study (HRS) / Medicare files with a newly constructed mapping of all FEMA disaster declarations between 1998 and 2012. We will address key gaps in the existing literature of detailed single-disaster studies with a generalizable perspective across time and space via these Specific Aims:
AIM 1: Quantify the association between the extent of a disaster ? measured as the repair cost to public infrastructure and increases in level of disability among survivors. We will follow respondents for an average of 5 years after the disaster. AIM 2: Quantify the association between the extent of a disaster and increases in the likelihood of hospitalization among survivors. AIM 3: Test the hypothesis that increases in level of disability and likelihood of hospitalization after disasters are worse for those living in counties with higher levels of poverty.
This proposal is specifically responsive to PA-11-265. This proposal is innovative because long-term effects of disasters, particularly for vulnerable older Americans, have been systematically neglected in previous research. It is significant because it will address the public health consequences of a relatively common but understudied exposure. Further, a key contribution of this R21 will be to evaluate the feasibility of the National Research Council conjecture that natural disasters can be studied as exogenous shocks to the environment, and that we can thereby test and elaborate usually endogenous mechanisms in the development of disability.

PI(s): Theodore Iwashyna

Co-I(s): Kenneth Langa, Yun Li, Anne Sales

Tue, April 08, 2014

Lewis Morgenstern’ s stroke education study offered in public schools in Texas to help children recognize symptoms of stroke is cited by Yahoo News, NPR, Fox News, and many other news outlets. Morgenstern was quoted, "The data was highly positive in terms of knowledge about stroke and their intention to call 911... The earlier we can make people aware of stroke and that it's arguably the most treatable of all catastrophic conditions, the better off we will be."
 

Research Topics: 
Tue, May 21, 2013

Masahito Jimbo was featured in a recent UMHS Press release, "Study finds gaps in “decision aids” designed to help determine right cancer screening option for patients." His study found that despite strong recommendations from the medical community to use these aids to help patients make more well-informed decisions, there is lack of evidence on whether they work – which may lead to fewer doctors using them. (Abstract)

Research Topics: 

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