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Fri, October 30, 2015

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was quoted by a number of news outlets on the relaunch of 23andme.

In an interview for the LA Time article regarding the relaunch, “Genetic testing evolves, along with health and ethics debates,” Brian Zikmund-Fisher disagrees that more information is always good.  Dr. Zikmund-Fisher points out, "Providing people with more information is not helpful if they can't do anything about it, or it leads them to focus on the wrong thing" — on their genes rather than their lifestyles, for example.”

J. Scott Roberts, PhD

Faculty

Scott Roberts, PhD, is Associate Professor of Health Behavior & Health Education at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health (U-M SPH), where he directs the School’s Public Health Genetics program and teaches a course on public health ethics. A clinical psychologist by training, Dr. Roberts conducts research on the psychosocial implications of genetic testing for adult-onset diseases.

Last Name: 
Roberts

Raymond De Vries, PhD

Associate Director

Raymond De Vries PhD is Associate Director at the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan and is a Professor in the Department of Learning Health Sciences and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He is also visiting professor at CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, University of Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Last Name: 
De Vries
Tue, January 10, 2017

Geoffrey Barnes was featured in a recent MHealth Lab article, "Medication Adherence a Problem in Atrial Fibrillation Patients." Dr. Barnes is the lead author of JAMA Cardiology article, which reports that while anticoagulant therapy is important for stroke prevention in people with atrial fibrillation, many people don’t stick with it for various reasons (side effects, physician advice, etc.).

Wed, October 11, 2017

In a study published in Cancer, Reshma Jagsi, Sarah Hawley and other researchers examined the impact double mastectomy on employment of breast cancer patients. They found that working patients who received more aggressive treatments were more likely to experience substantial employment disruptions.

Michele Gornick, PhD, MA

Faculty

Dr. Michele Gornick is a Research Investigator in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School. Her background training is in cancer genetics, with a focus on using quantitative methods to better understand the genome. Dr. Gornick joined CBSSM to pursue her interest in translational medicine, specifically dealing with issues surrounding communicating genomic information to patients, physicians and other health care providers. She was a VA and CBSSM Postdoctoral Fellow, 2012-2015.

 

 
Last Name: 
Gornick

Janice Firn, PhD, MSW

Faculty

Dr. Firn has a BS from Michigan State University, MSW from the University of Michigan, and PhD from Lancaster University (UK). Before CBSSM, Janice worked in oncology and palliative care at Michigan Medicine. In her role as Clinical Ethicist for the Clinical Ethics Service, Janice responds to ethics consultation requests, and participates in preventative ethics rounds and education and research initiatives.  Her academic interests include bioethics; self-care, burnout, and resilience; palliative and end of life care; and interprofessional education and collaboration.

Last Name: 
Firn
Wed, May 28, 2014

A recent study led by Dr. Sarah Hawley has found that most women who get a double mastectomy to prevent breast cancer don’t need to do it, and are often motivated by fear. Her study has been receiving national press and has been featured in NBC News, CBS News, the Chicago Tribune, MSN, and many, many other venues. Reshma Jagsi and several others were co-authors on this study.

2017 CBSSM Research Colloquium and Bishop Lecture (Norman Daniels, PhD)

Tue, April 25, 2017, 8:30am
Location: 
Great Lakes Room, Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) Research Colloquium was held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at the Great Lakes Room, Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium featured the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  Norman Daniels, PhD presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: “Universal Access vs Universal Coverage: Two models of what we should aim for."

Norman Daniels, PhD is Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health. Formerly chair of the Philosophy Department at Tufts University, his most recent books include Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly (Cambridge, 2008); Setting Limits Fairly: Learning to Share Resources for Health, 2nd edition, (Oxford, 2008); From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice (2000); Is Inequality Bad for Our Health? (2000); and Identified versus Statistical Lives (Oxford 2015). He has published 200 peer-reviewed articles and as many book chapters, editorials, and book reviews. His research is on justice and health policy, including priority setting in health systems, fairness and health systems reform, health inequalities, and intergenerational justice. A member of the IOM, a Fellow of the Hastings Center, and formerly on the ethics advisory boards of the CDC and the CIHR, he directs the Ethics concentration of the Health Policy PhD at Harvard and recently won the Everett Mendelsohn Award for mentoring graduate students.

2017 Colloquium Schedule:

  • 8:30     Check in, refreshments
  • 9:05     Welcome
  • 9:10     Presentation 1: “Setting priorities for Medicaid: The views of minority and underserved communities” Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA & Zachary Rowe, Executive Director, Friends of Parkside
  • 9:35     Presentation 2: ““How Acceptable Is Paternalism? A Survey-Based Study of Clinician and Non-clinician Opinions on Decision Making After Life Threatening Stroke” Kunal Bailoor, MD Candidate
  • 10:00   Medical Student in Ethics Award
  • 10:10   Presentation 3: “Ethical Challenges Faced by Providers in Pediatric Death: A Qualitative Thematic Analysis” Stephanie Kukora, MD
  • 10:35   Presentation 4: “Capacity for Preferences:  An overlooked criterion for resolving ethical dilemmas with incapacitated patients” Jason Wasserman, PhD & Mark Navin, PhD
  • 11:00   Break
  • 11:15  Bishop Lecture: Norman Daniels, PhD
  • 12:45  Lunch

Angela Fagerlin, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Fagerlin served as Co-Director of CBSSM from 2010-2015. She is currently Chair of the Department of Population Health Sciences at University of Utah School of Medicine and Research Scientist, Salt Lake City VA Center for Informatics Decision Enhancement and Surveillance (IDEAS)

Last Name: 
Fagerlin
Research Projects: 

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