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Caring for an ailing spouse may prolong your life. Stephanie Brown explains her research in a vodcast, featured on the University of Michigan website:  http://www.ns.umich.edu/podcast/vodcast.php. This vodcast was, appropriately, the university's home page lead for the week of Thanksgiving.

Funded by the National Science Foundation

Funding years: 2010-2013

Increasingly people are communicating with one another through new media such as text messages exchanged via mobile devices. At the same time, survey response rates continue to drop. These phenomena are related to the extent that respondents only use mobile devices (21% of US households no longer have a landline phone) and frequently rely on modes other than voice, most notably text (which is certainly the norm among some subgroups in the US and increasingly among entire populations in other countries). Yet we know little about the impact of multimodal mobile devices on survey participation, completion, data quality and respondent satisfaction.

The proposed research will explore these issues in two experiments that will collect survey data on iPhones in four modes defined by whether the interviewing agent is a live human or a computer, and whether the medium of communication is voice or text. The resulting modes are telephone interviews, instant message (IM) interviews, speech integrated voice response (IVR), and automated IM. This way of defining modes enables us to isolate the effects of the agent and medium. The first experiment explores the effect of the four modes on participation, completion, data quality and satisfaction; the second explores the impact on the same four measures of allowing participants to choose the response mode.

More information: http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/research/project-detail/34963

PI: Kathryn Moseley

Co-I: Mick Couper

Research Ethics

Research Ethics Service

The Research Ethics Service, led by Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD, MBioethics and Raymond De Vries, PhD within the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, aims to enable a culture of normative, empirical, and educational inquiry to serve as the ethical backbone of research at Michigan Medicine. Its three areas of focus include:


1. Education: providing instruction on Research Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research;
2. Consultation: offering a consulting service for colleagues with questions about the ethical conduct of research; 
3. Research: using a variety of methods to study issues in Research Ethics.


Research Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research Education

Coursework and independent projects into research ethics and the responsible conduct of research may be available upon request. Current courses include the Responsible Conduct of Research for K Awardees (RCR4K) Implementation Package offered through the Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR) and Legal Rules and Ethical Issues for Clinical Research (HMP 540) through the Clinical Research Design and Statistic Analysis Masters Program at the UM School of Public Health.


Research Ethics Consultation Service

Personalized Research Ethics Consultation may be available during normal business hours for investigators across Michigan Medicine designing or conducting their own research protocols. For further information or to request a consultation please contact kaytesb@med.umich.edu.


Mixed Methods Research into Human Subjects Research Ethics

The Program in Research Ethics also supports a vibrant mixed-methods empirical program for research on human subjects research ethics.

In a recent UofMHealth blog, Geoffrey Barnes weighs the pros and cons of Warfarin and Pradax, two atrial fibrillation medications.

The blog can be found here.

Darin Zahuranec’s survey study, “Variability in physician prognosis and recommendations after intracerebral hemorrhage” published in Neurology found that physicians vary substantially in ICH prognostic estimates and treatment recommendations. This study suggests that variability could have a profound effect on life and death decision-making and treatment for ICH.


Several CBSSM-affiliated faculty and alumni were co-authors: Angie Fagerlin, Meghan Roney, Andrea Fuhrel-Forbis, and Lewis Morgenstern.


http://ihpi.umich.edu/news/survey-severe-stroke-prognoses-differ-depending-doctor

Internet Survey Lab

Overview

The Internet Survey Lab at the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM), led by Dr. Brian Zikmund-Fisher, facilitates the programming of complex experimental designs, using the graphical and interactive capabilities of the Internet. CBSSM has extensive experience in developing, programming and conducting survey research using Internet-based methodologies. 

Why We Use the Internet

A key advantage of Internet surveys is that they can shape and direct a user's experience in response to computer generated randomization and/or respondents' own answers to questions earlier in the survey. Additionally, page and answer order can be truly randomized as appropriate to limit cognitive biases. The unique advantage of Internet surveys, however, is that many different types of stimuli can be randomized or varied; static visual images, movies, or sounds can all be used in addition to text. Furthermore, the nature of the browser interface enables user-directed interactivity, such as user-adjustable risk communication graphics, that provide unique opportunities for both knowledge communication and response assessment.

Using the Internet to conduct survey research is also very efficient: we can develop and test surveys in only a few months' time, and once a survey is ready, large scale data collection (e.g., 1500-3000 completed surveys) can be completed in only 2-3 weeks.  Such surveys can also be cost effective, since while significant effort goes into development, creation, and testing of the survey, almost no personnel effort is required for data collection, entering, coding, or cleaning.  In addition, oftentimes several small surveys can be combined into a single instrument, creating further efficiencies.

Sometimes, our studies use large, demographically diverse samples obtained through commercial survey research firms. This methodology allows us to tailor the population being surveyed on multiple demographic variables (e.g., sampling only women age 40-75 for a study about breast cancer treatments) and provides us with ample statistical power to conduct multi-factorial experimental tests. Other times, we use more inexpensive samples from Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) for quick pilot testing or to enable rapid, iterative testing of designs. Regardless, the use of randomized designs ensures high internal validity for the research despite the use of an Internet-only sample.

CBSSM Surveys

CBSSM has had considerable success using this methodology, publishing multiple manuscripts in highly regarded peer-reviewed journals. Studies that have used this methodology have addressed a variety of topics, including:

  • The use of pictographs to display risk (20082008, 2014) including in comparison to other graphical formats (2008, 2010, 2010). 
    Note: to create your own pictographs, see www.iconarray.com.
  • Misprediction of happiness between younger and older adults (2005)
  • Elicitation of utility and willingness to pay (200720072008)
  • Research ethics, e.g., participation of mentally vs. medically ill in research (2005)
  • Risk communications that emphasize incremental risks instead of absolute risks (2008)
  • Simplifying risk communications about adjuvant therapy options (2008).
  • Effect of risk labels on prenatal screening decisions (2007).
  • Time-insensitivity in people's understanding of survival curves (20052007)
  • Self-other discrepancies in medical decisions (20062008)
  • Sequential vs. all at once presentations of risk information (2011)
  • Testing of animated or interactive risk graphics (2011, 2012, 2014)
  • Optimal levels of precision in risk communications (2011, 2012)
  • Framing of health promotion messages (2012)
  • Exploration of role of narratives in decision making (2010)
  • Values Clarification (2015)
  • Intuition and Deliberation in Decision Making (2015)

Contact Us

For questions about our methods or inquiries about potential Internet survey research collaborations, please contact Brian Zikmund-Fisher at bzikmund@umich.edu.

Lauren Smith, MD

Faculty

Dr. Lauren Smith is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Michigan specializing in hematopathology.  She has been a member of the University of Michigan Adult Ethics Committee since 2005 and also serves as a Chair of the Michigan State Medical Society Ethics Committee.  Her research interests include ethical issues in clinical medicine and pathology.

 
Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Smith

2014 CBSSM Research Colloquium and Bishop Lecture (Myra Christopher)

Thu, May 15, 2014 (All day)
Location: 
Vandenberg Meeting Hall (2nd floor), The Michigan League, 911 N. University, Ann Arbor, MI

2014 CBSSM Colloquium and Bishop Lecture featuring Myra Christopher

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) Research Colloquium was held Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Vandenberg Meeting Hall (2nd floor), The Michigan League, 911 N. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
 

The CBSSM Research Colloquium featured the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  Myra Christopher presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: "The Moral Imperative to Transform the Way Pain is Perceived, Judged and Treated." Myra Christopher holds the Kathleen M. Foley Chair in Pain and Palliative Care at the Center for Practical Bioethics.

The 2014 Research Colloquium presenters:

  • Andrew G. Shuman, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Michigan: "When Not to Operate: The Dilemma of Surgical Unresectability"
  • Phoebe Danziger, MD, University of Michigan Medical School: "Beliefs, Biases, and Ethical Dilemmas in the Perinatal Counseling and Treatment of Severe Kidney Anomalies"
  • Kathryn L. Moseley, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor, Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan: "Electronic Medical Records: Challenges for Clinical Ethics Consultation"
  • Helen Morgan, MD,  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan: "Academic Integrity in the Pre-Health Undergraduate Experience"
  • Tanner Caverly, MD, MPH, Health Services Research Fellow, Ann Arbor VA Medical Center and Clinical Lecturer, University of Michigan: "How Transparent are Cancer Screening & Prevention Guidelines about the Benefits and Harms of What They Recommend?"
  • Susan D. Goold, MD, MHSA, MA , Professor of Internal Medicine and Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Michigan: "Controlling Health Costs: Physician Responses to Patient Expectations for Medical Care"
 

 

2011 CBSSM Research Colloquium

Fri, May 20, 2011 (All day)

The second annual Bioethics Research Colloquium was held Friday, May 20, 2011, at the Alumni Center.  The Colloquium was jointly sponsored by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine and the Center for Ethics in Public Life. 

The majority of the colloquium was devoted to presentations of research in or about bioethics conducted by University of Michigan faculty, fellows and students.  Presentations focused on theoretical, empirical, and critical approaches to understanding and resolving ethical issues in health care and the life sciences.

Presenters:

  • Apurba Chakrabarti, Department of Cellular, Molecular, and Developmental Biology: A bureaucratic framework of IRBs: Understanding how cultural forces influence the contemporary IRB bureaucracy.
  • Nathaniel Adam Tobias Coleman, Department of Philosophy: Online sexual racism and the prevalence of HIV among black MSM. 
  • Susan Dorr Goold, MD, MHSA, MA, Department of Internal Medicine: Market failures, moral failures, and health reform (keynote).
  • Henry Greenspan, PhD, Residential College, LSA: Temptation and trespass in the pharmaceutical industry: Incentivizing ethical self-regulation. 
  • Lisa H. Harris, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology: Obstetrician-gynecologists' objections to and willingness to help patients obtain abortion in various clinical scenarios: A national survey. 
  • Aisha T. Langford, MPH, Comprehensive Cancer Center: The misdiagnosis of the minority problem in cancer clinical trials: Is our focus on medical mistrust causing harm? 
  • Naomi Laventhal, MD, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases: Innovative therapies in the newborn intensive care unit: The ethics of off-label use of therapeutic hypothermia.
  • Erika Manu, MD, Department of Internal Medicine: Resident attitudes and experience with palliative care in patients with advanced dementia.
  • Karen M. Meagher, Department of Philosophy (MSU): Considering virtue: Public health and clinical ethics.
  • Andrew Shuman, MD, Department of Otolaryngology: The right not to hear: The ethics of parental refusal of hearing rehabilitation.
  • Lauren Smith, MD, Department of Pathology: Pathology review of outside material: When does it help and when can it hurt? 

CBSSM recently hosted the 2014 Research Colloquium held Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Vandenberg Meeting Hall (2nd floor), The Michigan League, 911 N. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium featured the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  Myra Christopher presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: "The Moral Imperative to Transform the Way Pain is Perceived, Judged and Treated." Myra Christopher holds the Kathleen M. Foley Chair in Pain and Palliative Care at the Center for Practical Bioethics. The Bishop Lecture is made possible by a generous gift from the estate of Ronald C. and Nancy V. Bishop.

The 2014 Research Colloquium presenters included:

  • Andrew G. Shuman, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Michigan: "When Not to Operate: The Dilemma of Surgical Unresectability"
  • Phoebe Danziger, MD, University of Michigan Medical School: "Beliefs, Biases, and Ethical Dilemmas in the Perinatal Counseling and Treatment of Severe Kidney Anomalies"
  • Kathryn L. Moseley, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor, Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan: "Electronic Medical Records: Challenges for Clinical Ethics Consultation"
  • Helen Morgan, MD,  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan: "Academic Integrity in the Pre-Health Undergraduate Experience"
  • Tanner Caverly, MD, MPH, Health Services Research Fellow, Ann Arbor VA Medical Center and Clinical Lecturer, University of Michigan: "How Transparent are Cancer Screening & Prevention Guidelines about the Benefits and Harms of What They Recommend?"
  • Susan D. Goold, MD, MHSA, MA , Professor of Internal Medicine and Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Michigan: "Controlling Health Costs: Physician Responses to Patient Expectations for Medical Care"

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