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Sarah Hawley's perspective piece, "Half of women with early-stage breast cancer consider prophylactic double mastectomy" was recently published in Healio ITJ (in the journals).

Full article can be found here.

Working Group Meeting- Kerry Ryan/Michele Gornick/Darin Zahuranec

Tue, September 26, 2017, 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC bldg 16 266C

Kerry, Michele, & Darin, will be seeking feedback on wording and flow/ordering of an interview guide. The interview will be with individuals at risk for Huntington’s Disease, individuals with HD, and/or family members/caregivers.

Thu, September 28, 2017

Matthew Corriere designed an decision aid app to patients with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) choose their care plan. His work was recently highlighted in MHealth Lab.

Thu, November 09, 2017

Kayte Spector-Bagdady was recently quoted for The State Journal-Register article on the investigation of Southern Illinois University researcher, William Halford's genital herpes vaccine research.

Research Topics: 

CBSSM Seminar: Christina Hunter Chapman, M.D., M.S.

Wed, December 13, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Christina Hunter Chapman, M.D., M.S.
Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology

Title: African Americans and Tailored Cancer Screening: Evidence and Ethics

Abstract: Dr. Chapman will discuss the elevated cancer mortality that African Americans experience and the ethical barriers to consideration of tailored cancer screening strategies that have the potential to reduce this disparity.

Fri, December 29, 2017

Kayte Spector-Bagdady was recently quoted in the Undark Magazine article, "The Present and Future Asymmetry of Consumer Genetic Testing" about the difficulties with achieving truly informed consent.

Lisa Harris, MD, PhD

Funded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Funding Years: 2014 - 2016.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Michigan has established a rigorous curriculum, with enhanced and mentored research practicum and exciting opportunities to engage in community-based and partnered participatory research. The curriculum is based on adult learning theory and integrates research theory and practical applications. This curriculum will fulfill requirements for a Master's Degree in Health and Health Care Research, a degree program that was designed specifically to meet the needs of the Clinical Scholars at the University of Michigan. These above courses make up the central components of the first year of Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Michigan. The second year of the Clinical Scholars Program is primarily devoted to research, with the Scholars' Research Committee continuing as an advisory committee. Education in the second year focuses more closely to each Scholar's specific needs. In the second year the Scholars also participate in a "Work-in-Progress Seminar" led by one of the Program Directors. Throughout all years of the program, Scholars participate in the Clinical Scholars noon health Seminar. This is a weekly 1.5 hour seminar which will alternate between presentation of research findings by Scholars, faculty, or invited guests, and presentations about health policy by Michigan faculty and invited guests. All Scholars are expected to attend the seminar each week, as well as the CSP Leadership, most Core Faculty, and selected guests.

PI(s): Rodney Hayward

Co-I(s): Matthew Davis, Gary Freed, Mary Ellen Heisler, Timothy Hofer, Joel Howell, Theodore Iwashyna, Eve Kerr, Joyce Lee, Richard Lichtenstein, Laurence McMahon Jr, Caroline Richardson, Mary AM Rogers, Sanjay Saint, Antonius Tsai, Michael Volk, Sara Waber

Funded by National Institutes of Health; National Institute on Aging

Funding Years; 2011-2016

A cornerstone of the nation's social science research infrastructure, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. families. Begun in 1968, 36 waves of data have now been collected on PSID families and their descendents. Its long-term measures of economic and social wellbeing have spurred researchers and policy makers to attend to the fundamental dynamism inherent in social and behavioral processes. The PSID is increasingly being used to answer innovative social and behavioral research questions in the context of an aging society. This application proposes to collect, process, and disseminate three modules in the 2013 and 2015 waves of the PSID: 1. Health module: Including 15 minutes of survey questions on health status, health behaviors, health insurance coverage & health care costs. Linkages to the National Death Index and Medicare will be extended; 2. Wealth module: Including 10 minutes of survey questions on wealth, active savings, and pensions. Linkage to Social Security earnings and benefits records for active sample and decedents will be undertaken for the first time, and a new module to minimize errors in reports of wealth changes will be developed and implemented; and 3. Wellbeing module with related psychosocial measures: We will design and implement a mixed-mode (web/mail out) questionnaire to collect content from both respondents and spouses about their wellbeing and related psychosocial measures (e.g., personality, intelligence), with an experiment to identify (and allow researchers to adjust for if necessary) mode effects. After collection, the data will be processed and distributed in the PSID Online Data Center, which will allow users to create customized extracts and codebooks using a cross-year variable index.

PI(s): Robert Schoeni

Co-I(s): Charles Brown, James House, Mick Couper

Tue, January 03, 2017

Reshma Jagsi was recently interviewed for a Marketplace (NPR) piece on the JAMA Internal Medicine study, "Comparison of Hospital Mortality and Readmission Rates for Medicare Patients Treated by Male vs Female Physicians" which found that elderly patients cared for by female doctors fare better than those treated by men.

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