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CBSSM Working Group Meeting-Michele Gornick

Tue, December 05, 2017, 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC bldg 16 266C

Michele is seeking feedback on a national survey of Veterans about consent options for sharing health data with commercial companies.

Thu, November 23, 2017

Reshma Jagsi, Director of CBSSM, was recently quoted for the Reuters Health article, "Female doctors adjust lives to accommodate home."

Research Topics: 

In a new commentary, Geoff Barnes argues “What you don’t know can kill you” as it related to untreated Atrial fibrillation, which leads to too many preventable strokes and deaths.

Research Topics: 

CBSSM Working Group Meeting-Geoff Barnes/David Kopin

Wed, December 20, 2017, 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC bldg 16 266C

Seeking on a survey to get further insight into practice patterns regarding oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet use in patients with both atrial fibrillation and stable coronary artery disease.

Maria Silveira, MD, MPH, is the lead author on an article in the New England Journal of Medicine (April 1, 2010) on end-of-life decision making. Silveira and her colleagues found in a large-scale study that more than a quarter of the elderly lacked decision-making capacity as they approached death. Those who had advance directives were very likely to get the care that they wanted. Co-authors on the study are Kenneth Langa, MD, PhD, and Scott Y.H. Kim, MD, PhD. Read a press release about the article here.

Wed, October 31, 2012

Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, recently had an article published in JAMA entitled “Gender Differences in the Salaries of Physician Researchers.” The results of the RWJ-funded study showed that male physician researchers earned $12,001 more than their female colleagues, after adjusting for a variety of factors that might impact salary. This disparity can add up to $350,000 over the course of a medical career.
Dr. Jagsi was interviewed by the Associated Press, and the article received considerable press coverage in multiple sources including the New York TimesForbes, MSNBC, and the Wall Street Journal. Click here for more information.

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) invited three speakers to provide their insights on the importance of professional ethics and professionalism in neuroscience research on February 10th. The speakers included Nicholas Steneck, Ph.D., Director of the Research Ethics and Integrity Program of the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research; David E. Wright, Ph.D., Director of the Office of Research Integrity at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; and Peggy Mason, Ph.D., Chair of the Society for Neuroscience’s Ethics Committee.

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Bioethics Grand Rounds: Janice Firn, MSW; Andrew Shuman, MD; Christian Vercler, MD

Wed, January 27, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

"Implementation of the Program in Clinical Ethics"

Janice Firn, MSW; Andrew Shuman, MD; Christian Vercler, MD

Abstract: The Program in Clinical Ethics within the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine represents an expansion of existing services designed to promote a culture of patient-centered excellence by developing a comprehensive set of ethics-related activities at UMHS. We will introduce and outline the projects and services available to all members of the UMHS Community.

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, May 25, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD, MBioethics

Abstract: In 1966, Dr. Henry Beecher argued that there was no more reliable safeguard for the human research subject than an “intelligent, informed, conscientious, compassionate, responsible investigator.” Considering the current strictures of our human subjects research compliance enterprise, and wide-spread industry hand wringing over the proposed revisions to regulations, we might perhaps long for a simpler time when researchers with “high ethical purposes and completely good morals” were assumed as opposed to compelled. And yet. This presentation will explore the implications and aftermath of the STD experiments conducted by the U.S. Public Health Service in Guatemala in the 1940s.

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