Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query news events news 2017 12 15.

Page not found

You are here

Aaron Scherer, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Aaron Scherer was a CBSSM Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2014-2016. Aaron earned his PhD in Psychology from the University of Iowa and utilizes methodologies from social psychology, social cognition, and neuropsychology to study the causes and consequencdees of biased beliefs. His current research has focused on the causes and consequences of biased beliefs regarding health and politics.

Last Name: 
Scherer

CBSSM Seminar: Cheryl A. Moyer, MPH, PhD

Thu, November 03, 2016, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Cheryl A. Moyer, MPH, PhD
Assistant Professor, Learning Health Sciences
Assistant Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Using GIS and Social Autopsy to understand where and why mothers and babies are dying in rural northern Ghana

Abstract: Cheryl Moyer, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Learning Health Sciences and Obstetrics & Gynecology, will describe a 3-year, USAID-funded project that involves identifying all maternal and neonatal deaths and ‘near-misses’ (those who survive a life-threatening event) across four districts in northern Ghana and conducting detailed verbal and social autopsies to determine both the biomedical cause of death and the sociocultural contributors. The project, known as PREMAND (PREventing Maternal And Neonatal Deaths), also involves geocoding the location of births, deaths, health facilities, traditional healer compounds, and other important landmarks to explore the role of geography in influencing outcomes.

Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Learning Health Systems Symposium

Fri, November 18, 2016, 8:30am to 3:30pm
Location: 
Taubman Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB) 109 Zina Pitcher Place

This symposium will promote dialogue and contribute to a research agenda on how learning health system organizers should engage the ethical, legal and social implications of this work.

The next generation of health information technology organizes data into large, networked systems to address challenges of U.S. health systems: spiraling costs, poor health outcomes, safety issues, unproductive research enterprises, and failure to implement known clinical best practices. More than simply “Big Data,” these systems are arranged as “learning health systems,” multi-stakeholder federations that gather and analyze data to create useful knowledge that is disseminated to all stakeholders. Harnessing the power of health data for learning strains ethical, legal, and social paradigms for how health information should be collected, stored, accessed, used, and destroyed.

CBSSM is a co-sponsor, along with the Brehm Center, the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), the School of Public Health, and Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS).

EVENT REGISTRATION

Chithra Perumalswami, MD, MSc

Fellow

Chithra Perumalswami is a general internist and palliative care specialist. After training at the University of Michigan for undergraduate (English and Cellular and Molecular Biology) and graduate school (medical school & residency), she worked at Northwestern University as a clinician educator in hospital medicine. During that time, she trained in hospice and palliative medicine and also worked on several local and statewide quality improvement initiatives.

Last Name: 
Perumalswami

CBSSM Seminar: Michele Gornick, PhD

Thu, January 15, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC 16-266C

Michele Gornick, PhD

VA HSRD Fellow & CBSSM Research Investigator

Title: The public’s preferences for the return of secondary findings identified through genome sequencing: Information and deliberation make a difference

Summary: Genomic sequencing is becoming a part of clinical practice. Existing studies are limited and conclude that people would like unrestricted access to all of their genetic information. However, we do not know the extent to which respondents in these studies took into account the complex scientific and ethical issues that attend genome sequencing. In order to address this gap, we organized a deliberative democracy (DD) session to educate members of the public on genome sequencing, to engage them in dialogue about the benefits and risks of the clinical implementation of this technology, and to elicit their informed perspectives about policies governing the return of secondary findings.

A commentary by Reshma Jagsi, "From Muslim Registries to Radical Health Care Reform—Caring for Patients in an Era of Political Anxiety" was recently published in JAMA Oncology. Click here for full commentary.

Michele Heisler, MD, MPA

Check out the Ethics Path available to Michigan medical students through the Paths of Excellence (PoE) program. The ethics path provides opportunities for individualized, independent study, combined with field work with CBSSM, and a capstone project in the M4 year.

Click here for more information about the PoE program.

Research Topics: 

PIHCD- Martha Dabis & Ray De Vries

Wed, April 26, 2017, 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC bldg 16 B004E

Discussion: Initial Inquiry into testing "Workings of the Human Spirit" theory (by the Chaplaincy Research Consortium) - chaplaincy research in clinical settings, outpatient cancer care, using UCSF methodology "Spiritual Assessment and Intervention Model".

Thu, May 04, 2017

Cancer Therapy Advisor asked Scott Roberts about the PGen Study and the implications for Direct-to-Consumer cancer risk testing in the future. Check out the Q&A session in the link below.

Pages