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PIHCD: Sarah Alvarez

Thu, November 05, 2015, 2:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Sarah Alvarez, a fellow at Stanford and formerly of Michigan Radio, will  present her work on creating a news product that can meet the information needs of low-income news consumers. Specifically her focus is on how to use data to discover which issues or systems information gaps exist for low-income news consumers and once the gaps are identified how the information should be presented to help people understand the information and use it to make decisions.

If you plan to attend this meeting please e-mail Nicole Exe at nexe@umich.edu by Monday November 2. If you decide to attend after that date you are still welcome and do not need to e-mail.

James Burke was awarded the Michael S. Pessin Stroke Leadership Prize. This award recognizes emerging neurologists who have a strong interest in and have demonstrated a passion for learning and expanding the field of stroke research.

Faculty: 
Research Topics: 

Jeffrey Kullgren, MS, MD, MPH

Faculty

Dr. Jeff Kullgren is a Research Scientist in the Center for Clinical Management Research at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School and Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.  Dr.

Last Name: 
Kullgren

2013 Bishop Lecture featuring Ruth Macklin, PhD

Wed, April 17, 2013 (All day)

The Bishop Lecture in Bioethics served as the keynote address for 2013 CBSSM Research Colloquium. The Bishop Lecture is an endowed lectureship made possible by a gift from the estate of Ronald C. and Nancy V. Bishop.  Ruth Macklin, PhD, Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health and Dr. Shoshanah Trachtenberg Frackman Faculty Scholar in Biomedical Ethics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, will present the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled, “Global Gender Justice:  Violence against women; whose responsibility?”

Keynote Abstract: In some countries, governmental authorities have done little to prevent or punish violence against women.  Examples of gender-based violence include not only intimate partner violence, but also rape as a weapon of war, civilian rape, and killing condoned in so-called "honor cultures."  Can a theory of global justice shed light on whether external governments or non-governmental groups should take responsibility for remedying the situation?  Who has the responsibility to respond to human rights violations?

The Bishop Lecture in Bioethics was jointly sponsored by the Bishop Lectureship in Bioethics fund and by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM). 

  • Click here for the video recording of the 2013 Bishop Lecture.
Mon, October 30, 2017

In a recent US Department of Health and Human Services symposium, Andrew Shuman discussed patient data privacy.

Adam Marks, MD

Faculty

Dr. Marks is associate director of the adult Palliative and Supportive Care Clinic at the East Ann Arbor Health and Geriatrics Center, as well as the Adult Palliative Care medical director at Arbor Hospice. He received his medical degree and masters of public health from the Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin. He completed his combined internal medicine-pediatrics residency at the University of Michigan, where he also completed his fellowship training in palliative care.

Last Name: 
Marks

Julie Wright Nunes, MD, MPH

Faculty

Julie Wright Nunes is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan Department of Internal Medicine. Her research interests include Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and its prevention and also the development of methods and tools to help facilitate and optimize provider-directed CKD patient education.

Last Name: 
Wright Nunes

How would you adapt? (Nov-05)

Could you cope and find happiness if you were living with paraplegia? Think about what it would be like to have paraplegia and to imagine the impact of this disability on your life. Although some aspects of your life will become more difficult, there are ways to make your daily life a little easier.

List something that would help you to adapt physically if you had paraplegia. (For example, if you lost your eyesight, you could learn Braille, and/or use a cane). Just as there are ways to help you to adapt physically to paraplegia, there are also ways to help handle the immediate and long-term emotional reactions. List a strategy that you would use to emotionally cope with having paraplegia.

Please think about the two most upsetting things about developing paraplegia. Do you think these two things would become more or less upsetting over time?

  • More upsetting over time
  • Less upsetting over time
  • Equally upsetting over time

Please rate paraplegia on a scale from 0 to 100, where 0=quality of life as bad as death and 100=quality of life as good as perfect health.

How do your answers compare?

Those who were given the adaptation exercise rated paraplegia much higher, 62. That means considering adaption tends to have people look more favorably on paraplegia than they otherwise would. For most people, the adaptation exercise resulted in higher ratings. Let's take a closer look at the actual study and explore the importance of considering adaptation.

A discrepancy in perceptions of quality of life

When people first think about a disability, it might seem pretty catastrophic. At first glance, you might think that people living with paraplegia must be miserable. Patients who actually have paraplegia, however, report their quality of life to be significantly better than the public estimates that it would be. It appears, then, that there is a discrepancy between the self-rated quality of life of people with paraplegia, and healthy people's estimates of what their quality of life would be if they had this condition.

Why this discrepancy?

CBDSM director Peter Ubel teamed up with researchers Christopher Jepson and George Loewenstein to conduct a series of studies that aimed to explain why this discrepancy exists. Past research has suggested that patients do not overestimate their good mood, which led the researchers to hypothesize that, in fact, non-patients truly underestimate the quality of life experienced by people with disabilities. The researchers speculated about two explanations that could account for this underestimation. One possibility is that non-patients may be subject to a focusing illusion. That is, they might fail to appreciate that not all life domains or life events will be affected by the disability. Another possibility is that non-patients may be failing to consider adaptation, unable to realize how their feelings and their ability to cope will change over time.

In one study, each subject received one of several defocusing tasks in addition to rating paraplegia. For example, one of these tasks asked subjects to rate how much better or worse their life would be with regards to eight specific life events (e.g., visiting with friends). Another task asked subjects to think of five events that took up the largest amount of their time the preceding day and to rate how much better or worse these events would be if they had paraplegia. In a second study, subjects received one of several adaptation exercise in addition to rating paraplegia. One of these was similar to what you read on the previous page, although more extensive. Another had subjects consider their quality of life both 1 month and 5 years after developing paraplegia. In both studies, sujects rated paraplegia either before and after or only after completing an intervention.

The researchers found that none of the defocusing tasks had any effect on ratings of paraplegia. In fact, these tasks actually caused many participants to give lower ratings than they would have otherwise. All of the adaptation exercises, on the other hand, increased subjects' ratings of paraplegia. Taken together, these results support that the tendency of nonpatients to underestimate the quality of life associated with disabilities is not the result of a focusing illusion, but rather the result of failure to consider adaptation.

Read the article:

Disability and sunshine: Can predictions be improved by drawing attention to focusing illusions or emotional adaptation?
Ubel PA, Jepson C, Loewenstein G. American Journal of Psychiatry 2005;11:111-123.

Geoffrey Barnes, MD, MSc

Faculty

Geoff Barnes is a cardiologist and vascular medicine specialist at the University of Michigan Health System. He completed his undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering at Washington University in St. Louis (2003) followed by medical school at the University of Michigan (2007).  He then completed a residency (2010), chief residency (2011) in internal medicine, cardiology fellowship (2014) and vascular medicine fellowship (2014) at the University of Michigan.  His areas of research interest include anticoagulation, venous thromboembolism, quality improvement and shared decision making.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Barnes

Michele Gornick, PhD, MA

Faculty

Dr. Michele Gornick is a Research Investigator in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School. Her background training is in cancer genetics, with a focus on using quantitative methods to better understand the genome. Dr. Gornick joined CBSSM to pursue her interest in translational medicine, specifically dealing with issues surrounding communicating genomic information to patients, physicians and other health care providers. She was a VA and CBSSM Postdoctoral Fellow, 2012-2015.

 

 
Last Name: 
Gornick

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