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Fri, October 27, 2017

An older Behavioral Economics study by Brian Zikmund-Fisher and Andrew Parker was recently highlighted in a Nerdwallet Blog about the continued demand for rent-to-own contracts.

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Bioethics Grand Rounds -Susan Goold, MD

Wed, July 26, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Auditorium

Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA, FACP Title: “Trust me, I’m an Accountable Care Organization”

Abstract: Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are a new form of health care organization in which a network of health care providers is given a financial incentive to reduce total costs of care while meeting certain quality benchmarks for a defined patient group. What are the moral responsibilities of such organizations, if any? How might ACOs and those who work in them care for patients in an accountable, trustworthy way?

 

Peter A. Ubel, MD

Alumni

Peter Ubel, MD, is a physician and behavioral scientist whose research and writing explores the quirks in human nature that influence people's lives — the mixture of rational and irrational forces that affect health, happiness and the way society functions.

Dr. Ubel is Professor of Marketing and Public Policy at Duke University. He was Professor of Medicine and Psychology at the University of Michigan, where he taught from 2000 to 2010, and from 2005-2010, served as the Director of the Center for Behavioral and Decision Sciences in Medicine.

Last Name: 
Ubel

Erica Sutton, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Erica Sutton was a CBSSM Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2013-2015. She is an interdisciplinary social scientist engaged in social and behavioral science research that explores the health care experiences of individuals living with rare genetic conditions; the manner in which biotechnologies shape personal experience and social life; and the ethical implications of these technologies for individuals, public health, social policy, health care institutions, and communities.

Last Name: 
Sutton
Tue, April 08, 2014

Lewis Morgenstern’ s stroke education study offered in public schools in Texas to help children recognize symptoms of stroke is cited by Yahoo News, NPR, Fox News, and many other news outlets. Morgenstern was quoted, "The data was highly positive in terms of knowledge about stroke and their intention to call 911... The earlier we can make people aware of stroke and that it's arguably the most treatable of all catastrophic conditions, the better off we will be."
 

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Tue, May 21, 2013

Sarah Hawley is featured in ClickOnDetroit news item,"The debate over breast cancer treatment" in which Local 4's Rhonda Walker takes a closer look at the aggressive treatment more and more woman who are facing breast cancer are choosing.

Wed, May 21, 2014

 Beth Tarini's 2009 study regarding use of newborn screening samples for research was cited in US News & World Report, which found only 28.2 percent of parents were “very or somewhat willing” to consent to research using their child’s blood samples if their permission were not obtained. In fact, without consent, 55.7 percent would be “very unwilling.” 

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Sun, October 17, 2010

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, was featured in an interview by the U-M News Service on September 29, 2010.  Dr. Zikmund-Fisher served as the featured guest editor for a special supplement to Medical Decision Making, Sept/Oct 2010, that focused on the DECISIONS study. In the interview, Dr. Zikmund-Fisher highlighted the need for health care providers to do a better job of educating patients about the medical decisions they face.  A video highlights the findings of the study and can be found at: http://ns.umich.edu/htdocs/releases/story.php?id=8008.  CBSSM faculty also involved in the DECISIONS study included Angela Fagerlin, PhD, and Mick Couper, PhD

Wed, May 18, 2016

Reshma Jagsi’s survey of high-achieving physician-scientists published in JAMA, found that nearly a third of women reported experiencing sexual harassment. As women now make up about half of medical school students, the researchers emphasize the importance of recognizing unconscious bias as well as overtly inappropriate behaviors.

1. Reshma Jagsi, Kent A. Griffith, Rochelle Jones, Chithra R. Perumalswami, Peter Ubel, Abigail Stewart. Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Experiences of Academic Medical Faculty. JAMA, 2016; 315 (19): 2120 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.2188

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Fri, October 04, 2013

The US News & World Report quoted Sarah Hawley and cited her research in a story about the tendency of young women with breast cancer to overestimate their risk of getting cancer in the opposite, healthy breast. 

An excerpt from the article, "Unfounded Fear Prompts Some Preventive Mastectomies: Study":

The findings echo some previous research, according to Sarah Hawley, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan Health System, in Ann Arbor. In her study, presented last year at a medical meeting, Hawley found that nearly 70 percent of women choosing the contralateral prophylactic mastectomy actually had a low risk of developing cancer in the healthy breast.

"Their findings are consistent with ours, in that desire to prevent cancer in the non-affected breast is a big reason patients reported for getting [contralateral prophylactic mastectomy]," Hawley said.

Better communication is needed to be sure women know the risks and benefits, and lack of benefit of getting the preventive surgery, Hawley pointed out. Better strategies to help patients manage anxiety and worry would help, too, she added.

 

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