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Tue, May 07, 2013

Dr. Kathryn Moseley was recently quoted in a Detroit Free Press article, "Proposed law would force hospitals to tell when care won't be given." 

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Tue, May 21, 2013

Masahito Jimbo was featured in a recent UMHS Press release, "Study finds gaps in “decision aids” designed to help determine right cancer screening option for patients." His study found that despite strong recommendations from the medical community to use these aids to help patients make more well-informed decisions, there is lack of evidence on whether they work – which may lead to fewer doctors using them. (Abstract)

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Fri, September 05, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher joined other public health experts to talk about the increasing number of outbreaks of diseases that had largely been eliminated by vaccinations generations ago. Many doctors attribute the rising cases of measles, mumps and whooping cough to parents skipping or delaying vaccinating their children.

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Press Kit

About CBSSM

CBSSM acts at the premier intellectual gathering place of clinicians, social scientists, bioethicists, and all others interested in improving individual and societal health through scholarship and service.

Schedule an Interview

Members of the media interested in interviewing Center members can call the UMHS Public Relations office at 734-764-2220 between the hours 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern Time, or email us directly at cbssm-mgr@umich.edu

Peter A. Ubel, MD

Alumni

Peter Ubel, MD, is a physician and behavioral scientist whose research and writing explores the quirks in human nature that influence people's lives — the mixture of rational and irrational forces that affect health, happiness and the way society functions.

Dr. Ubel is Professor of Marketing and Public Policy at Duke University. He was Professor of Medicine and Psychology at the University of Michigan, where he taught from 2000 to 2010, and from 2005-2010, served as the Director of the Center for Behavioral and Decision Sciences in Medicine.

Last Name: 
Ubel

Panel: Sexual Harassment in Medicine

Mon, November 12, 2018, 4:00pm to 5:30pm
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Location: 
Biomedical Science Research Building - Kahn Auditorium

Sexual Harassment in Medicine

Welcome by Mark Schlissel, President of the University of Michigan

PANELISTS :
- Paula Johnson, President of Wellesley College, Chairperson of the National Academies committee, and member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine
- Reshma Jagsi, Professor and Deputy Chair in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Michigan Medicine and Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, U-M

REPORT SUMMARY & MODERATION:
- Lilia Cortina,* Associate Director of ADVANCE for the College of LSA; Professor of Psychology, Women’s Studies, and Management and Organizations, U-M
- Anna Kirkland,* Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender; Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Women’s Studies, U-M

In 2016, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine assembled a committee to conduct a study on the impact of sexual harassment in academia on the career advancement of women in the scientific, technical, and medical workforce. The committee published a comprehensive report titled, "Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine," in June 2018. The report identifies key findings on the causes and impacts of sexual harassment, and recommendations for institutional policies, strategies, and practices to address and prevent it.

Preventing and effectively addressing sexual harassment of women in colleges and universities has remained a challenge for decades. More than half of women faculty and staff report having been harassed. Student surveys of university systems show disturbingly similar rates, with 20–50% of women students experiencing sexually harassing behavior perpetrated by faculty or staff.

Persistent sexual harassment in STEM fields, and its adverse impacts on women’s careers, jeopardizes progress in closing the gender gap, damages research integrity, and results in a costly loss of talent. Academic sciences, engineering, and medicine share characteristics that create conditions for harassment, but many findings of the report are not limited to STEM field settings. Other fields within academia can be similarly male-dominated, hierarchical work and learning settings in which abusive cultures may form. Such environments can silence and limit the career opportunities for both the targets of the sexual harassment and bystanders, causing both men and women to leave their fields.

This panel will include a summary of the report, discussion from the report’s co-authors, commentary from disciplinary experts, and Q&A with the audience.

The panel will offer broad discussion of use to any member of the university community or the public interested in sexual harassment in academia. A reception will follow.

Sexual Harassment in the Academy Panel Discussion Series is presented by IRWG and the Office of Research, with co-sponsorship from: ADVANCE, The Office for Health Equity and Inclusion, the College of Literature Sciences, and the Arts, and the College of Engineering

Questions or for accessibility information, please contact irwg@umich.edu or (734) 764-9537.

Tue, April 08, 2014

Lewis Morgenstern’ s stroke education study offered in public schools in Texas to help children recognize symptoms of stroke is cited by Yahoo News, NPR, Fox News, and many other news outlets. Morgenstern was quoted, "The data was highly positive in terms of knowledge about stroke and their intention to call 911... The earlier we can make people aware of stroke and that it's arguably the most treatable of all catastrophic conditions, the better off we will be."
 

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Mon, April 24, 2017

Reshma Jagsi was recently quoted in the Reuters Health News article, "How consent requirements may shape teen mental health research."

Tue, May 21, 2013

Sarah Hawley is featured in ClickOnDetroit news item,"The debate over breast cancer treatment" in which Local 4's Rhonda Walker takes a closer look at the aggressive treatment more and more woman who are facing breast cancer are choosing.

Wed, May 21, 2014

 Beth Tarini's 2009 study regarding use of newborn screening samples for research was cited in US News & World Report, which found only 28.2 percent of parents were “very or somewhat willing” to consent to research using their child’s blood samples if their permission were not obtained. In fact, without consent, 55.7 percent would be “very unwilling.” 

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