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Bioethics Grand Rounds

With support from the UMHS Office of Clinical Affairs and C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital, CBSSM’s Program in Clinical Ethics sponsors the monthly Bioethics Grand Rounds, focusing on ethical issues arising in health care and medicine. This educational session is open to UMHS faculty and staff and CME credit is available.

Link to previous Bioethics Grand Rounds:

 

CBSSM joined 75+ exhibitors from labs and offices of the Medical School and across campus for the 2017 Researchpalooza.

Sponsored by the Office of Research, Researchpalooza is the perfect opportunity for colleagues and friends to have a great time and meet, mingle, and learn more about many of the organizations that offer their stellar services to faculty, students, and staff, all at one convenient time and location.

Thu, July 06, 2017

In an MHealth Lab article, Kenneth Langa discusses a new report, "Preventing Cognitive Decline and Dementia: a Way Forward" from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Jacob Solomon, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Jacob Solomon was a CBSSM Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2015-2017.

Jacob Solomon completed a PhD in Media and Information Studies at Michigan State University in 2015. His research is focused on Human-Computer Interaction and Human Factors Engineering where he studies how the design of interactive systems affects users’ behavior. His research merges methods from social sciences with computer and information science to design, build, and evaluate socio-technical systems.

Last Name: 
Solomon
Wed, February 15, 2017

According to a study by Reshma Jagsi and colleagues, doctors often fail to recommend genetic testing for breast-cancer patients, even those who are at high risk for mutations linked to ovarian and other cancers. They surveyed 2,529 breast-cancer patients and found that although two-thirds of the women reported wanting genetic testing, less than a third actually got it. About 8 in 10 women at highest risk for BRCA mutations — because of family history or ancestry — said they had wanted testing, but only a little more than half received it.

Jodyn Platt, MPH, PhD, Assistant Professor of Learning Health Sciences, has been named a University of Chicago MacLean Fellow.

As part of the one year Cancer Genomics and Ethics Big Data Science Fellowship she will receive clinical training in the Medical Ethics Summer Intensive Program and conduct a research project with Olufunmilayo Olopade, MD, FACP, Director of the Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics at University of Chicago Medicine.

Platt explains how her work as a fellow will begin: "I would like to systematically observe and interview individuals involved in shaping how data evolves and moves from the patient encounter to the big data enterprise and back to clinical care." Looking forward to expanding her network over the course of the year, she plans "to engage in, and lead, interdisciplinary scholarship that will ensure the revolution in healthcare delivery brought on by big data and cancer genomics is an ethical one." 

Platt is also the organizer of the upcoming ELSI-LHS symposium on November 15th at U-M which explores the “Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Learning Health Systems”.

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, January 25, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Meredith Walton presents "Opting In or Opting Out: The Ethical Principles Underlying Two Methods of Organ Donation."

Abstract: Recent legislation in France adopting an opt-out system of organ donation has again brought the issue of presumed consent in organ donation to the forefront of ethical discussion.  Proponents of the legislation have used the idea of ‘normative consent’ to justify it, as well as the expected increase in donation rates. But those opposed have argued that it strips the individual of their autonomy and does not in fact increase donation rates.This presentation seeks to define opt-in and opt-out systems of organ donation, explore principles of autonomy and consent surrounding the issue and reflect on whether adopting an opt-out system will truly increase the rate of organ donation

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, February 22, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Devan Stahl, Assistant Professor, Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences, Department of Pediatrics and Human Development Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy

Title –  Responding to Hopes for a Miracle

Abstract: How should clinicians respond to patient’s or family’s hope for a “miracle”? What if the family wants to continue aggressive care that clinicians believe is non-beneficial in the hopes that a miracle will occur? The presentation will frame the discussion of miracle language and offer practical guidance on working with patients and families who invoke miracle language during a patient’s hospital stay.

At the end of this presentation participants will be able to:

1. Classify and distinguish between the most common ways patients/families use miracle language
2. Describe the ethical tensions that emerge when families request that clinicians continue non-beneficial care in the hopes a miracle will occur
3. Identify a set of strategies for productively engaging with patients/families who expect miracles

Bioethics Grand Rounds -Anna Kirkland, JD, PhD

Wed, June 28, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Auditorium

Anna Kirkland, JD, PhD Title –  "The Vaccine Injury Compensation Court and Its Critics"

Presenter –  Anna Kirkland, JD, PhD, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Women's Studies and Political Science, University of Michigan

Abstract: The so-called vaccine court is a small special court in the United States Court of Federal Claims that handles controversial claims that a vaccine has harmed someone. The government steps in as the defendant and vaccine manufacturers are protected from liability. In this court, lawyers, activists, judges, doctors, and scientists come together, sometimes arguing bitterly, trying to figure out whether a vaccine really caused a person’s medical problem. Drawing on her recently published book, Vaccine Court: The Law and Politics of Injury (NYU Press, 2016), Prof. Anna Kirkland will discuss the ethical controversies surrounding the vaccine court, from the perspective of anti-vaccine movement activists as well as from the mainstream.

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