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Funded by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

Funding Years: 2014-2018

The central objective of the Healthy Michigan Plan is to improve the health and well-being of Michigan residents by extending health care coverage to low-income adults who are uninsured or underinsured. The program also introduces a number of reforms, including cost-sharing for individuals with incomes above the Federal Poverty Level, the creation of individual MI Health Accounts to record health care expenses and cost-sharing contributions, and opportunities for beneficiaries to reduce their cost-sharing by completing health risk assessments and engaging in healthy behaviors. This project conducts the evaluation of Michigan's Medicaid expansion, the Healthy Michigan Plan (HMP).

PI(s): John Ayanian

Co-I(s): Tammy Chang, Sarah Clark, Matthew Davis, A M Fendrick, Susan Goold, Adrianne Haggins, Richard Hirth, Edith Kieffer, Jeffrey Kullgren, Sunghee Lee, Ann-Marie Rosland

CBSSM Seminar: Darin Zahuranec, MD

Wed, January 20, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Darin Zahuranec, MD


Assistant Professor, Neurology

Title:  Improving decisions on life-sustaining treatments after stroke

Abstract:  Individuals with acute stroke face the sudden onset of new deficits, along with a need to make many decisions about medical treatments with impact on the potential for survival and long-term disability. This talk will review the challenges in decision-making after acute stroke and discuss possible solutions for the future.

 

Funded by National Caner Institute

Funding Years: 2003-2014

 

PI: Angela Fagerlin

Funded by NIH - National Institute Of Nursing Research

The project aims are 1) To develop a tailored web-based decision support intervention to prepare stroke surrogates to make decisions on use of life sustaining treatments; and 2) To pilot test the tailored decision support intervention in surrogate decision makers of hospitalized stroke patients. Key features of the tool will include an advanced statistical prognostic calculator that presents customized outcome data in a tailored and accessible fashion; an exercise to assist the surrogate in clarifying values most important to the patient, and questions to ask the health care team to empower surrogates to communicate more effectively. Information obtained in this R21 is critically important to the development of a novel tool that can be tested in a future definitive R01 study in order to better match treatment plans to patient wishes, reduce adverse outcomes among surrogates, and limit unwanted variability in end-of life treatment.

PI: Darin Zahuranec, MD

Brian Zikmund-Fisher gave an oral presentation at The Forum 10 hosted by DMAA: The Care Continuum Alliance, Washington, DC.

Funded by the National Institutes of Health/Brigham and Women's Hospital/Boston University

Funding years: 2010-2013

The rapid identifcation of genetic risk factors for common, complex diseases poses great opportunities and challenges for public health. Genetic information is increasingly being utilized as part of commercial effors, including direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing to provide risk information on common diseases to consumers. Very few empirical data have been gathered to understand the characteristics of DTC test consumers, the psychological, behavioral and health impact (clinical utility), and the ethical, legal and social issues associated with DTC services.

In the proposed research, we will survey users of the two leading US companies providing DTC genetic testing (23andMe and Navigenics) regarding their response to genetic test s for common diseases of interest, including heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease (AD), arthritis, and breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers. Each company now has thousands of customers and each anticipates extensive sales in coming years. Each has agreed to allow our group to survey consumers using third-party data collection and analysis procedures that will enable an independent consideration of the benefits and risks of DTC testing in this format. The companies have also agreed to provide genetic test information (with respondents' permission) for analyses. A total of 1000 consumers (500 from each company) website will be surveyed via the Internet at three time points: 1) before receipt of genetic test results; 2) approximately two weeks following receipt of test results; and 3) six months following receipt of results.

More information: http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/research/project-detail/35031

PI: Scott Roberts

Co-I: Mick Couper

PIHCD Working Group

Thu, March 05, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC

David Hutton will be speaking about a project to examine how patients and providers make decisions and value different attributes of high-cost biologic medications for ophthalmologic use.

PIHCD Working Group: Aaron Scherer, PhD

Thu, May 14, 2015, 3:30pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Aaron Scherer, PhD

Aaron Scherer will be speaking about a series of studies exploring how beliefs in medical conspiracies influence medical decision making.

 

PIHCD: Jon Keevil

Thu, December 03, 2015, 4:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Jon Keevil from Health Decision will be speaking about working with EMRs to incorporate icon arrays for physician-patient communication.

PIHCD:Melissa Cousino-Hood

Wed, November 30, 2016, 4:00pm
Location: 
B003E NCRC Building 16

Melissa will speak about an internal grant to better understand provider practices, specific to involving pediatric patients in end of life planning, prognostication and involvement in difficult medical decision-making.

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