Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query cbssm med umich edu people andrew shuman md.

Page not found

You are here

Geoffrey Barnes, MD, MSc

Faculty

Geoff Barnes is a cardiologist and vascular medicine specialist at the University of Michigan Health System. He completed his undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering at Washington University in St. Louis (2003) followed by medical school at the University of Michigan (2007).  He then completed a residency (2010), chief residency (2011) in internal medicine, cardiology fellowship (2014) and vascular medicine fellowship (2014) at the University of Michigan.  His areas of research interest include anticoagulation, venous thromboembolism, quality improvement and shared decision making.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Barnes

2012 Bishop Lecture featuring Jerome Groopman, MD and Pamela Hartzband, MD

Thu, May 10, 2012 (All day)

The 2012 Bishop Lecture featured New York Times best selling authors, Jerome Groopman, MD, Dina and Raphael Recanati Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Pamela Hartzband, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Drs. Groopman and Hartzband jointly presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled, “When Experts Disagree: The Art of Medical Decision Making.” 

Drs. Groopman and Hartzband are co-authors of a 2011 book, “Your Medical Mind,” which outlines how patients can navigate health care choices when making medical decisions.  In addition to conducting research on blood development, cancer, and AIDS, Dr. Groopman writes regularly for the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The New Republic, and the Washington Post.  A noted endocrinologist and educator, Dr. Hartzband specializes in disorders of the thyroid, adrenal, and pituitary glands, and in women’s health.  She has authored articles on the impact of electronic records, uniform practice guidelines, monetary incentives, and the Internet on the culture of clinical care.  

  • Click here for the videorecording of the 2012 Bishop Lecture.

Seated: Jerome Groopman and Pamela Hartzband 

Standing from Left: Scott Kim, Susan Goold, Angela Fagerlin, Christine Bishop, Jane Bishop, and David Bishop

 

 

 

The Program on Medicine and Religion at the University of Chicago sponsors a Faculty Scholars Program designed to develop faculty leaders who will expand scholarship and education regarding the spiritual dimensions of the practice of medicine.  The program targets junior faculty with an interest in physician spirituality, and successful applicants will receive up to $75,000/year in salary support.  For more information, see pmr.uchicago.edu/fsp. 

Funded by the National Institutes of Health/Princeton University

Funding years: 2009-2013

The goal of this proposal is the development of “bottom-up” measures of daily experience, combining elements of time sampling with detailed episodic reinstantiation of events. Future use of the measures includes research into well-being and age-related changes in activities and experiences. I will (1) design methodological studies for the development and validation of these measures (Event Reconstruction Method, Day Reconstruction Method, and future variants); (2) develop the question program for pilot studies using the measures; (3) supervise the implementation of the pilot studies in form of web-based self-administered questionnaires; (4) participate in meetings in Princeton; and (5) present and publish relevant results.

More information: http://micda.psc.isr.umich.edu/project/detail/34823

PI: Norbert Schwarz

Angela Fagerlin was listed as one of the top 1% of most-cited researchers worldwide.

More than 3,200 researchers worldwide were included in the Thompson Reuters list, which ranks an individual’s impact based on a survey of Highly Cited Papers (defined as being in the top 1 percent by citations in the Web of Science database) between 2002-2012.

The University of Michigan ranks No. 11 in a new list of most-cited researchers produced by Thompson Reuters, with 27 U-M scientists determined by the company to be in the top 1 percent of their fields.

Link: http://research.umich.edu/blog/2014/07/31/u-m-ranks-no-11-in-new-list-of-most-cited-researchers/

Link: https://www.umhsheadlines.org/2014/08/angela-fagerlin-ph-d-listed-as-one-of-the-top-1-of-most-cited-researchers-worldwide/

 

The vast majority of oncologists (84%) say that they consider costs to the patient when recommending cancer treatments. But fewer than half of oncologists frequently discuss cost issues with their patients. These are some of the results of a national survey conducted by Peter Neuman, ScD (Tufts Medical Center) and CBSSM's former Director Peter A. Ubel, MD, funded by the California HealthCare Foundation. Results were published in the January 2010 Health Affairs. Ubel comments: "Oncologists understand, from up close, that cancer diagnoses and treatment leave many people bankrupt. They want to do what is medically right for their patients, but they are struggling to figure out what, at the same time, is economically right for them." Read the article here.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Ethics in Public Life and the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, the 2nd annual Bioethics Colloquium took place on Friday, May 20, 8:30-3:30 pm, in the Alumni Center.  The colloquium featured presentations of research in or about bioethics conducted by U-M faculty, fellows, and students.

The keynote speaker was Susan Dorr Goold, MD, MHSA, MA, who gave a talk entitled, "Market failures, moral failures, and health reform."

Nearly 70 people attended the event, which featured 10 presentations by faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students drawn from a variety of disciplines.

Sat, December 03, 2011

Dr Michael Volk was interviewed by Michigan Radio recently regarding a study he conducted that appears in the journal Liver Transplantation.  He found that 42 percent of people waiting for a liver transplant were unwilling to accept anything less than an ideal organ, even if doing so could cost them their lives. 

Research Topics: 

Pages