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Panel: Sexual Harassment in Medicine

Mon, November 12, 2018, 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Biomedical Science Research Building - Kahn Auditorium

Sexual Harassment in Medicine

Welcome by Mark Schlissel, President of the University of Michigan

PANELISTS :
- Paula Johnson, President of Wellesley College, Chairperson of the National Academies committee, and member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine
- Reshma Jagsi, Professor and Deputy Chair in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Michigan Medicine and Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, U-M

REPORT SUMMARY & MODERATION:
- Lilia Cortina,* Associate Director of ADVANCE for the College of LSA; Professor of Psychology, Women’s Studies, and Management and Organizations, U-M
- Anna Kirkland,* Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender; Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Women’s Studies, U-M

In 2016, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine assembled a committee to conduct a study on the impact of sexual harassment in academia on the career advancement of women in the scientific, technical, and medical workforce. The committee published a comprehensive report titled, "Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine," in June 2018. The report identifies key findings on the causes and impacts of sexual harassment, and recommendations for institutional policies, strategies, and practices to address and prevent it.

Preventing and effectively addressing sexual harassment of women in colleges and universities has remained a challenge for decades. More than half of women faculty and staff report having been harassed. Student surveys of university systems show disturbingly similar rates, with 20–50% of women students experiencing sexually harassing behavior perpetrated by faculty or staff.

Persistent sexual harassment in STEM fields, and its adverse impacts on women’s careers, jeopardizes progress in closing the gender gap, damages research integrity, and results in a costly loss of talent. Academic sciences, engineering, and medicine share characteristics that create conditions for harassment, but many findings of the report are not limited to STEM field settings. Other fields within academia can be similarly male-dominated, hierarchical work and learning settings in which abusive cultures may form. Such environments can silence and limit the career opportunities for both the targets of the sexual harassment and bystanders, causing both men and women to leave their fields.

This panel will include a summary of the report, discussion from the report’s co-authors, commentary from disciplinary experts, and Q&A with the audience.

The panel will offer broad discussion of use to any member of the university community or the public interested in sexual harassment in academia. A reception will follow.

Sexual Harassment in the Academy Panel Discussion Series is presented by IRWG and the Office of Research, with co-sponsorship from: ADVANCE, The Office for Health Equity and Inclusion, the College of Literature Sciences, and the Arts, and the College of Engineering

Questions or for accessibility information, please contact irwg@umich.edu or (734) 764-9537.

Mon, April 24, 2017

Reshma Jagsi was recently quoted in the Reuters Health News article, "How consent requirements may shape teen mental health research."

Tue, May 21, 2013

Sarah Hawley is featured in ClickOnDetroit news item,"The debate over breast cancer treatment" in which Local 4's Rhonda Walker takes a closer look at the aggressive treatment more and more woman who are facing breast cancer are choosing.

Sun, October 17, 2010

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, was featured in an interview by the U-M News Service on September 29, 2010.  Dr. Zikmund-Fisher served as the featured guest editor for a special supplement to Medical Decision Making, Sept/Oct 2010, that focused on the DECISIONS study. In the interview, Dr. Zikmund-Fisher highlighted the need for health care providers to do a better job of educating patients about the medical decisions they face.  A video highlights the findings of the study and can be found at: http://ns.umich.edu/htdocs/releases/story.php?id=8008.  CBSSM faculty also involved in the DECISIONS study included Angela Fagerlin, PhD, and Mick Couper, PhD

Wed, May 18, 2016

Reshma Jagsi’s survey of high-achieving physician-scientists published in JAMA, found that nearly a third of women reported experiencing sexual harassment. As women now make up about half of medical school students, the researchers emphasize the importance of recognizing unconscious bias as well as overtly inappropriate behaviors.

1. Reshma Jagsi, Kent A. Griffith, Rochelle Jones, Chithra R. Perumalswami, Peter Ubel, Abigail Stewart. Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Experiences of Academic Medical Faculty. JAMA, 2016; 315 (19): 2120 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.2188

Research Topics: 
Fri, October 04, 2013

The US News & World Report quoted Sarah Hawley and cited her research in a story about the tendency of young women with breast cancer to overestimate their risk of getting cancer in the opposite, healthy breast. 

An excerpt from the article, "Unfounded Fear Prompts Some Preventive Mastectomies: Study":

The findings echo some previous research, according to Sarah Hawley, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan Health System, in Ann Arbor. In her study, presented last year at a medical meeting, Hawley found that nearly 70 percent of women choosing the contralateral prophylactic mastectomy actually had a low risk of developing cancer in the healthy breast.

"Their findings are consistent with ours, in that desire to prevent cancer in the non-affected breast is a big reason patients reported for getting [contralateral prophylactic mastectomy]," Hawley said.

Better communication is needed to be sure women know the risks and benefits, and lack of benefit of getting the preventive surgery, Hawley pointed out. Better strategies to help patients manage anxiety and worry would help, too, she added.

 

Research Topics: 
Sat, December 15, 2018

It's become a holiday tradition, but the cookie dough controversy is back in the news! New highlights include Brian Zikmund-Fisher's Dr. Seuss-inspired Twitter responses to the FDA's Scott Gottlieb's (also Dr. Seussian) warnings against consumption of raw cookie dough.

Due to food safety concerns, the FDA recently released a statement that strongly advises the public from indulging in raw cookie dough. In Brian Zikmund-Fisher response to the FDA's warning in The Conversation, he discusses balancing the minimization of risk with the maximization of life: "...let’s all please remind ourselves that our goal is not to minimize all risk, no matter the cost. Our goal is to maximize life. Sometimes maximizing life means warning people that their flour is contaminated and making sure they throw it out. Sometimes maximizing life means letting them enjoy some (carefully prepared) cookie dough without shame."

Research Topics: 

Janice Firn, PhD, MSW

Faculty

Dr. Firn has a BS from Michigan State University, MSW from the University of Michigan, and PhD from Lancaster University (UK). Janice is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Learning Health Sciences (DLHS), Division of Professional Education. Before DLHS, Janice worked in oncology and palliative care at Michigan Medicine. She is also part of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM), and serves as a Clinical Ethicist for the Clinical Ethics Service.

Last Name: 
Firn

Jody Platt, PhD, MPH

Faculty

Jody Platt, PhD, MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Learning Health Sciences, Division of Learning and Knowledge Systems. She received her MPH and PhD from the University of Michigan School of Public Health in health policy, with a concentration in medical sociology. Her research interests are in trust in health and health care, and the ethical, legal, and social implications of learning health systems, precision medicine, and big health data.

Last Name: 
Platt

Julie Wright Nunes, MD, MPH

Faculty

Julie Wright Nunes is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan Department of Internal Medicine. Her research interests include Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and its prevention and also the development of methods and tools to help facilitate and optimize provider-directed CKD patient education.

Last Name: 
Wright Nunes

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