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Fri, December 15, 2017

In light of the #MeToo campaign denouncing sexual assault and harassment, Reshma Jagsi has written a perspective piece in the New England Journal of Medicine about sexual harrassment in academic medicine. Also check out her interview in MHealth Lab.

Research Topics: 

2013 Bishop Lecture featuring Ruth Macklin, PhD

Wed, April 17, 2013 (All day)

The Bishop Lecture in Bioethics served as the keynote address for 2013 CBSSM Research Colloquium. The Bishop Lecture is an endowed lectureship made possible by a gift from the estate of Ronald C. and Nancy V. Bishop.  Ruth Macklin, PhD, Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health and Dr. Shoshanah Trachtenberg Frackman Faculty Scholar in Biomedical Ethics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, will present the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled, “Global Gender Justice:  Violence against women; whose responsibility?”

Keynote Abstract: In some countries, governmental authorities have done little to prevent or punish violence against women.  Examples of gender-based violence include not only intimate partner violence, but also rape as a weapon of war, civilian rape, and killing condoned in so-called "honor cultures."  Can a theory of global justice shed light on whether external governments or non-governmental groups should take responsibility for remedying the situation?  Who has the responsibility to respond to human rights violations?

The Bishop Lecture in Bioethics was jointly sponsored by the Bishop Lectureship in Bioethics fund and by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM). 

  • Click here for the videorecording of the 2013 Bishop Lecture.

Bioethics Grand Rounds -Susan Goold, MD

Wed, July 26, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Auditorium

Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA, FACP Title: “Trust me, I’m an Accountable Care Organization”

Abstract: Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are a new form of health care organization in which a network of health care providers is given a financial incentive to reduce total costs of care while meeting certain quality benchmarks for a defined patient group. What are the moral responsibilities of such organizations, if any? How might ACOs and those who work in them care for patients in an accountable, trustworthy way?

 

Brian Zikmund-Fisher is presenting the Berguer Lecture on Ethics, "Communicating Everything Important Poorly vs. One Critical Thing Well" in Danto Auditorium, Frankel Cardiovascular Center on Friday, January 26th 4 - 5 pm. This lecture is open to faculty, staff, students, and the public having an interest in medical journalism, public policy and ethics.
 

Leaving the Emergency Room in a Fog (Sep-09)

Consider this scenario:

Alfred made a visit to his local Emergency Room. What was his diagnosis? What did the medical team do for his problem? What was he supposed to do to continue care at home? And what symptoms was he supposed to watch for to alert him to return to the ER?

Alfred woke up at 4 am on Sunday morning with pain in his left foot. That place where his new running shoes had rubbed a raw spot earlier in the week was getting worse. By 9 am, the foot was red and swollen, with a large oozing sore, and Alfred decided to go to the Emergency Room at his local hospital.

Late on Sunday afternoon, Alfred returned home from the ER. He crutched his way into the house and collapsed on the sofa. His teenage son quizzed him.

"What did they say was wrong?"
"Oh, an infection," replied Alfred.
"Well, what did they do for it?"
"I think they cut a chunk out of my foot," said Alfred.
"Whoa! Did they give you any medicine?"
"Yeah, a shot," said Alfred.
"And what’s with the crutches?"
"I’m supposed to use them for a while," said Alfred, looking annoyed.
"How long a while?"
"It’s written down," said Alfred, digging a crumpled sheet of paper out of his pocket.
"Says here you should take some prescription and elevate your left leg for two days."
"Two days? I have to go to work tomorrow," groaned Alfred.
"And you’re supposed to go back to the ER if you have a fever or pain in your leg. Where’s the prescription?"
"Here, look through my wallet. Maybe I stuck it in there," said Alfred.
The good news is that Alfred recovered completely, with some assistance and cajoling from his son. But how common is it for people who go to the Emergency Room to be foggy about what happened and what they should do once they leave the ER?
What do you think is the percentage of ER patients who do not understand at least one of the following: their diagnosis, the emergency care they received, their discharge care, or their return instructions?
 
  • 38%
  • 48%
  • 78%
  • 88%

How do your answers compare?

A recent study in the Annals of Emergency Medicine found that 78% of emergency room patients showed deficient comprehension in at least one of these areas:
 
  • Diagnosis
  • Emergency care that was given
  • Post-ER care needs
  • Symptoms that would require a return to the ER
51% of patients showed deficient comprehension in two or more areas. Only 22% of reports from patients were in complete harmony with what their care teams reported in all four areas. The biggest area of misunderstanding was in patients' post-ER care needs, such as medications, self-care steps, follow-up from their regular doctors, or follow-up with specialists.
 
Even more alarming is that, according to the study, "most patients appear to be unaware of their lack of understanding and report inappropriate confidence in their comprehension and recall." The patients were quite sure of what they knew 80% of the time—even when what they knew was not right.
 
These results suggest that Emergency Room teams need to do a better job of making sure that patients go home with clear information and instructions—and that patients and their loved ones shouldn't leave until they fully comprehend their situation.
 
Lead author Kirsten G. Engel, MD, conducted this study, "Patient Comprehension of Emergency Department Care and Instructions," with Michele Heisler, MD, Dylan M. Smith, PhD , Claire H. Robinson, MPH, Jane H.Forman, ScD, MHS, and Peter A. Ubel, MD, most of whom are affiliated with CBDSM.
 
The researchers carried out detailed interviews with 140 English-speaking patients who visited one of two Emergency Departments in southeast Michigan and were released to go home. These interviews were compared with the patients' medical records, and the comparisons revealed serious mismatches between what the medical teams found or advised and what the patients comprehended.
 
"It is critical that emergency patients understand their diagnosis, their care, and, perhaps most important, their discharge instructions," says Kirsten Engel, a former UM Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar who is now at Northwestern University. "It is disturbing that so many patients do not understand their post-Emergency-Department care, and that they do not even recognize where the gaps in understanding are. Patients who fail to follow discharge instructions may have a greater likelihood of complications after leaving the Emergency Department."
 
Peter A. Ubel, the study's senior author, agrees: "Doctors need to not only ask patients if they have questions, but ask them to explain, in their own words, what they think is wrong with their health and what they can do about it. And patients need to ask their doctors more questions, and even need to explain to their doctors what they think is going on."
 
Read the article:

 

Tanner Caverly, MD, MPH

Faculty

Tanner Caverly has been a general internist and Health Services Research Fellow at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center and a Clinical Lecturer at the University of Michigan Medical School since July 2013. He graduated from medical school at The Ohio State University School of Medicine and Public Health, and subsequently traveled to the University of Colorado, where he completed internal medicine residency training, a year as Chief Medical Resident, and a Primary Care Research Fellowship / Masters in Public Health.

Last Name: 
Caverly
Thu, February 11, 2016

Raymond De Vries, PhD and Scott Kim, MD, PhD 's study of euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS) for persons with psychiatric illnesses was recently written up in the New York Times. They found that persons receiving EAS for psychiatric disorders in the Netherlands were mostly women, of diverse ages, with complex and chronic psychiatric, medical, and psychosocial histories. They also reported that in more than half of approved cases, people had declined treatment that could have helped, and that many cited loneliness as an important reason for wanting to die. Dr. De Vries and Dr. Kim are current and former co-directors of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) .


Citation: Kim SYH, DeVries RG, Peteet JR. Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide of Patients With Psychiatric Disorders in the Netherlands 2011 to 2014. JAMA Psychiatry. 2016.

 

Fri, October 30, 2015

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was quoted by a number of news outlets on the relaunch of 23andme.

In an interview for the LA Time article regarding the relaunch, “Genetic testing evolves, along with health and ethics debates,” Brian Zikmund-Fisher disagrees that more information is always good.  Dr. Zikmund-Fisher points out, "Providing people with more information is not helpful if they can't do anything about it, or it leads them to focus on the wrong thing" — on their genes rather than their lifestyles, for example.”

Holly Witteman, formerly a post doctoral fellow at CBSSM and currently an assistant professor in the Faculty of Medicine at Université Laval, and colleagues’ 2016 article “One-Sided Social Media Comments Influenced Opinions And Intentions About Home Birth: An Experimental Study” was featured on Eurekalert!  an online, global news service operated by AAAS, the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The article was published in the April edition of Health Affairs and the co-authors are Angela Fagerlin, Nicole Exe, Marie-Eve Trottier and Brian Zikmund-Fisher.

An online experiment revealed that one-sided comments after health articles could influence people’s opinion about the health topic. It raises questions about how to ensure health related comment sections remain balanced.

EurekAlert!

Research Topics: 
Thu, December 08, 2016

Reshma Jagsi, MD, discusses the risk of complications on patients receiving radiation therapy if they've had implant reconstruction. Radiation therapy may affect outcomes of breast construction, and more is needed to help patients make informed choices.

San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) Presentation Title: Impact of radiotherapy on complications and patient-reported satisfaction with breast reconstruction: Findings from the prospective multicenter MROC study

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