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Thu, February 11, 2016

Raymond De Vries, PhD and Scott Kim, MD, PhD 's study of euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS) for persons with psychiatric illnesses was recently written up in the New York Times. They found that persons receiving EAS for psychiatric disorders in the Netherlands were mostly women, of diverse ages, with complex and chronic psychiatric, medical, and psychosocial histories. They also reported that in more than half of approved cases, people had declined treatment that could have helped, and that many cited loneliness as an important reason for wanting to die. Dr. De Vries and Dr. Kim are current and former co-directors of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) .

Citation: Kim SYH, DeVries RG, Peteet JR. Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide of Patients With Psychiatric Disorders in the Netherlands 2011 to 2014. JAMA Psychiatry. 2016.


In a new commentary, Geoff Barnes argues “What you don’t know can kill you” as it related to untreated Atrial fibrillation, which leads to too many preventable strokes and deaths.

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Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, PhD

Associate Director

Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, as well as a Research Associate Professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School. He has been part of CBSSM and its precursors at U-M since 2002 and acts as CBSSM Associate Director.

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Tue, April 08, 2014

Lewis Morgenstern’ s stroke education study offered in public schools in Texas to help children recognize symptoms of stroke is cited by Yahoo News, NPR, Fox News, and many other news outlets. Morgenstern was quoted, "The data was highly positive in terms of knowledge about stroke and their intention to call 911... The earlier we can make people aware of stroke and that it's arguably the most treatable of all catastrophic conditions, the better off we will be."

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Tue, May 21, 2013

Sarah Hawley is featured in ClickOnDetroit news item,"The debate over breast cancer treatment" in which Local 4's Rhonda Walker takes a closer look at the aggressive treatment more and more woman who are facing breast cancer are choosing.

Wed, May 21, 2014

 Beth Tarini's 2009 study regarding use of newborn screening samples for research was cited in US News & World Report, which found only 28.2 percent of parents were “very or somewhat willing” to consent to research using their child’s blood samples if their permission were not obtained. In fact, without consent, 55.7 percent would be “very unwilling.” 

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Mon, December 15, 2014

Dr. Joel Howell recently co-authored The Detroit News Article, "Stop calling our troops 'boots on the ground." In this opinion piece Dr. Howell and Dr. Sanjay Saint discuss their disdain for the phrase and include experiences with veterans they've come to know through the VA.

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Sun, October 17, 2010

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, was featured in an interview by the U-M News Service on September 29, 2010.  Dr. Zikmund-Fisher served as the featured guest editor for a special supplement to Medical Decision Making, Sept/Oct 2010, that focused on the DECISIONS study. In the interview, Dr. Zikmund-Fisher highlighted the need for health care providers to do a better job of educating patients about the medical decisions they face.  A video highlights the findings of the study and can be found at:  CBSSM faculty also involved in the DECISIONS study included Angela Fagerlin, PhD, and Mick Couper, PhD

Wed, May 18, 2016

Reshma Jagsi’s survey of high-achieving physician-scientists published in JAMA, found that nearly a third of women reported experiencing sexual harassment. As women now make up about half of medical school students, the researchers emphasize the importance of recognizing unconscious bias as well as overtly inappropriate behaviors.

1. Reshma Jagsi, Kent A. Griffith, Rochelle Jones, Chithra R. Perumalswami, Peter Ubel, Abigail Stewart. Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Experiences of Academic Medical Faculty. JAMA, 2016; 315 (19): 2120 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.2188

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Fri, October 04, 2013

The US News & World Report quoted Sarah Hawley and cited her research in a story about the tendency of young women with breast cancer to overestimate their risk of getting cancer in the opposite, healthy breast. 

An excerpt from the article, "Unfounded Fear Prompts Some Preventive Mastectomies: Study":

The findings echo some previous research, according to Sarah Hawley, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan Health System, in Ann Arbor. In her study, presented last year at a medical meeting, Hawley found that nearly 70 percent of women choosing the contralateral prophylactic mastectomy actually had a low risk of developing cancer in the healthy breast.

"Their findings are consistent with ours, in that desire to prevent cancer in the non-affected breast is a big reason patients reported for getting [contralateral prophylactic mastectomy]," Hawley said.

Better communication is needed to be sure women know the risks and benefits, and lack of benefit of getting the preventive surgery, Hawley pointed out. Better strategies to help patients manage anxiety and worry would help, too, she added.


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