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Thu, August 14, 2014

Tarini and her colleagues studied parent attitudes about using newborn screening samples for research. The research, published in 2009, found that if permission is obtained, 76.2% of parents were ‘very or somewhat willing’ to permit use of the newborn screening sample for research. If permission is not obtained, only 28.2% of parents were ‘very or somewhat willing.’

The CBS story was about a new law that allows Minnesota health officials to indefinitely hold blood samples from newborn babies without parental consent.

Research Topics: 
Thu, February 26, 2015

Joel Howell is co-author in a paper published in Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, “The heartfelt music of Ludwig van Beethoven.”  The paper analyzes several of Beethoven's compositions for clues of a heart condition some have speculated he had.

“His music may have been both figuratively and physically heartfelt,” says co-author Joel Howell, M.D., Ph.D, a professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School and member of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. “When your heart beats irregularly from heart disease, it does so in some predictable patterns. We think we hear some of those same patterns in his music.”

Goldberger ZD, Whiting SM, Howell JD. The heartfelt music of Ludwig van Beethoven. Perspect Biol Med. 2014 Spring;57(2):285-94. doi: 10.1353/pbm.2014.0013.

Research Topics: 
Thu, October 29, 2015

Jeremy Sussman has received much press for a recent study in JAMA about rates of treatment deintensification in diabetes. Dr. Sussman is first author of a study that found that among older diabetes patients whose treatment resulted in very low blood pressure, only a minority (27% or fewer) underwent treatment deintensification for diabetes, which represents a lost opportunity to reduce overtreatment. The study suggests practice guidelines and performance measures should place more focus on reducing overtreatment through deintensification.

Tanner Caverly and other CBSSM faculty co-authored a national survey study in JAMA examining VA primary care health-care professionals' beliefs regarding prescribing for older diabetics. This study found misperceptions about the benefits of stringent blood glucose control and concerns about negative repercussions following deintensification of therapy. This study is also being cited in a number of press articles.

Original studies:

Sussman, Jeremy B., Eve A. Kerr, Sameer D. Saini, Rob G. Holleman, Mandi L. Klamerus, Lillian C. Min, Sandeep Vijan, and Timothy P. Hofer. "Rates of Deintensification of Blood Pressure and Glycemic Medication Treatment Based on Levels of Control and Life Expectancy in Older Patients With Diabetes Mellitus." JAMA Internal Medicine (2015): 1-8.

Caverly, Tanner J., Angela Fagerlin, Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, Susan Kirsh, Jeffrey Todd Kullgren, Katherine Prenovost, and Eve A. Kerr. "Appropriate Prescribing for Patients With Diabetes at High Risk for Hypoglycemia: National Survey of Veterans Affairs Health Care Professionals." JAMA internal medicine (2015): 1-3.

Fri, October 30, 2015

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was quoted by a number of news outlets on the relaunch of 23andme.

In an interview for the LA Time article regarding the relaunch, “Genetic testing evolves, along with health and ethics debates,” Brian Zikmund-Fisher disagrees that more information is always good.  Dr. Zikmund-Fisher points out, "Providing people with more information is not helpful if they can't do anything about it, or it leads them to focus on the wrong thing" — on their genes rather than their lifestyles, for example.”

Kathryn Moseley served as one of the judges at "The Big Ethical Question Slam 5" hosted by a2ethics.org. In addition, Naomi Laventhal, Michele Gornick, Christian Vercler, Lauren Smith, and Lauren Wancata served as judges at the "Michigan Highschool Ethics Bowl 2."

Thanks to all the CBSSM folks who contributed their time!

For more information about these events and other great ethics-related activites, go to a2ethics.org.

A short video about the Highschool Ethics Bowl can be found here.

Wed, February 03, 2016

Beth Tarini, MD, MS and colleagues are back in the news regarding their 2013 article in Pediatrics entitled, “Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?” Their article was cited in CNNCBS NewsNew York TimesAnnarbor.com and many others. 

Citation: Allexan SS,  Byington CL, Finkelstein JI, Tarini  BA (2013 ). "Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?" Pediatrics; DOI: 10.1542/peds.2012-1438 [Epub ahead of print]

Research Topics: 
Fri, May 08, 2015

Their research was featured in PR Newswire and M Health News.

Research Topics: 

Jeffrey Kullgren, MS, MD, MPH

Faculty

Dr. Jeff Kullgren is a Research Scientist in the Center for Clinical Management Research at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School and Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.  Dr.

Last Name: 
Kullgren

Bioethics Grand Rounds: Musical Event "When Death Comes Callin"

Wed, October 26, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

When Death Comes Callin': Songs and Reflections About Death

Charlotte DeVries, Jeanne Mackey, Merilynne Rush, and friends offer a program of songs and brief readings reflecting various perspectives on death - humorous, sad, thoughtful, and quirky.

Lunch is provided on a first-come, first-served basis.

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