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Funded by National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2015-2020

Every day in hospitals across the country, patients with severe stroke and their families are faced with decisions about life-sustaining treatments in the initial hours of admission. These decisions about resuscitation status, invasive treatments, or possible transitions to comfort care are typically made by a surrogate decision- maker due to communication or cognitive deficits in the patient. This surrogate must consider the patient's life goals and values to determine if their loved one would choose on-going intensive treatments where they may survive and yet have long term disabilities, or prioritize comfort and accept the likelihood of an earlier death. Serving as a surrogate decision maker for a patient in the intensive care unit can have long lasting negative consequences. However, almost nothing is known about surrogate decision makers in diverse populations with stroke. Hispanic Americans are now the largest minority group in the US, rapidly growing and aging, with Mexican Americans comprising the largest subgroup. Multiple disparities have been identified in stroke incidence and outcome between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites, particularly in the use of life- sustaining treatments. Minority populations may be particularly vulnerable to inadequate communication about end-of-life issues due to socioeconomic disadvantage, poor health literacy, and lack of provider empathy and health system strategies to improve communication. However, Mexican American culture includes strong values of family support and religiosity that may have a positive influence on discussions about life-sustaining treatment and adapting to stroke-related disabilities. There is currently a critical gap in understanding the perspectives and outcomes of stroke surrogate decision makers, making it impossible to design interventions to help diverse populations of patients and families through this incredibly trying time.

PI(s): Lewis Morgenstern, Darin Zahuranec

Co-I(s): Lynda Lisabeth, Brisa Sanchez

Funded by : University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Funding Years: 2015-2016

 

PI: Sarah Hawley, PhD, MPH

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding years: 2011-2015

Colorectal cancer has a major impact on Americans, yet its screening rate remains suboptimal. This study aims to improve colorectal cancer screening rate by using an innovative and interactive decision aid that helps patients choose among colorectal cancer screening options. The study will also elucidate how patients and physicians discuss colorectal cancer screening options. for more information visit NIH Reporter.

PI: Masahito Jimbo

Co-I: Sarah Hawley

Funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Funding Years: 2012-2013.

Diabetes is a complex, chronic disease encompassing many domains of treatment. VHA and others have created diabetes guidelines to help support providers and patients in making choices about optimal treatment approaches. However, most guidelines are broad in nature, and offer relatively little guidance on how to personalize care in order to maximize treatment benefits, minimize the intensity and negative effects of treatment, and best align with individual treatment preferences. 

We will test the effectiveness of a personalized decision support program. Our long term goals are:

  • To test and implement a decision support program, including decision coaching supported by an interactive, personalized decision support tool, in clinical practice via our Patient-Aligned Care Team (PACT) laboratory.
  • To assess the impact of personalized decision support on patient-centeredness, patient satisfaction, and the effectiveness of risk communication and treatment decision making.

We propose an interventional study to examine the effectiveness of personalized decision support. The intervention will consist of two key components: a decision coach  and a personalized diabetes decision support tool. The decision support tool has mostly been developed via AHRQ and local pilot funding mechanisms, and is informed by personalized estimation of treatment benefits for blood glucose, blood pressure, and lipid treatment based on extensive modeling work done by our investigative team. The personalized benefit information is communicated through graphical risk communication methods (pictographs).  

PI(s): Angela Fagerlin 

Ken Langa, MD, PhD

Faculty

Dr. Langa is the Cyrus Sturgis Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine and Institute for Social Research, a Research Scientist in the Veterans Affairs Center for Clinical Management Research, and an Associate Director of the Institute of Gerontology, all at the University of Michigan. He is also Associate Director of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a National Institute on Aging funded longitudinal study of 20,000 adults in the United States ( http://hrsonline.isr.umich.edu ).

Last Name: 
Langa

Sarah Hawley, PhD, MPH

Faculty

Dr. Sarah T. Hawley is a Professor in the Division of General Medicine at the University of Michigan and a Research Investigator at the Ann Arbor VA Center of Excellence in Health Services Research & Development. She holds a PhD in health services research from the University of North Carolina and an MPH from Yale University Department of Public Health. Her primary research is in decision making related to cancer prevention and control, particularly among racial/ethnic minority and underserved populations.

Last Name: 
Hawley
Press Coverage: 
Thu, February 01, 2018

Breast cancer patients face complex decisions about their treatment. Sarah Hawley, Reshma Jagsi, and colleagues developed an interactive online tool to help patients understand their treatment options. In a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, they found that patients using the interactive tool had higher knowledge and felt more informed about options and felt better prepared to make a treatment choice.

Parents' decision-making about medicating infants (Jul-13)

Imagine that you are the parent of a 1-month-old infant. Your infant spits up a lot. Often there is so much spit-up that you are amazed that there is anything left in your infant’s stomach.  After spitting-up, your infant cries a lot. The crying and spitting seems especially bad after eating. But sometimes it seems like she is uncomfortable most of the time. It seems like there is nothing that you can do to stop the crying or to soothe your infant. You are worried that an infant who is this uncomfortable, and that spits up this much, might not be healthy. So, you decided to take your infant to the doctor to be checked.

After listening to your story and examining your infant, your doctor says, “You infant has something called GERD, or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. GERD happens when infants have a weak valve at the entrance to their stomach and, as a result, food and acid from the stomach can travel back up toward the infant’s mouth. When this happens, the infant may spit-up, and the acid in the spit-up may make her uncomfortable, and cause her to cry. Some doctors prescribe a medication that is often used to treat infants with GERD. Most infants grow out of GERD on their own, but medication is an option if you want it. However, studies have shown that this medicine probably doesn’t do anything to help improve symptoms in babies with GERD. This is the same medication that is taken by adults who have bothersome heartburn. This medication is generally considered safe for infants, and rarely causes serious side effects. I’ll give you this prescription and leave it up to you to decide whether or not you want to give it to your infant.”

Jacob Solomon, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Jacob Solomon was a CBSSM Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2015-2017.

Jacob Solomon completed a PhD in Media and Information Studies at Michigan State University in 2015. His research is focused on Human-Computer Interaction and Human Factors Engineering where he studies how the design of interactive systems affects users’ behavior. His research merges methods from social sciences with computer and information science to design, build, and evaluate socio-technical systems.

Last Name: 
Solomon

Funded by the Informed Medical Decision Making Foundation

Funding Years: 2010-2012

The overall long-term goal of this research program is to develop values clarification exercises that improve decision quality.  The research funded by this grant aims to establish the feasibility of the development and evaluation of a dynamic interactive tool that explicitly encourages values exploration and clarification.  For this study, values exploration means that patients will be encouraged to “try on” different ideas, see immediate and dynamic visual feedback, adjust and re-adjust their values, and save settings at multiple time points in order to recall and compare thoughts and feelings.  It is hypothesized that by explicitly supporting a potentially circuitous path of values exploration, the resulting approach will be more reflective of the intuitive processes that people follow to arrive at states of greater clarity.

Angela Fagerlin (PI)

 

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