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Mon, April 17, 2017

Brian Zikmund-Fisher is quoted in a recent MarketWatch article, "How doctors are getting patients more involved in their own care." Dr. Zikmund-Fisher points out, "Patients are often overwhelmed by massive amounts of data they now have access to. The easier we make it for them to understand, the more likely it is they will use it and the less time the doctor has to spend explaining it.” The article goes on to cite a web-based application developed by Dr. Zikmund-Fisher and colleagues that allows health-care providers and researchers to create graphics that use icons in arrays that show risk information in ways that make it easier for people to grasp information.

A study by former CBSSM Co-Director, Angela Fagerlin, is also cited in the article.

Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, PhD

Associate Director

Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, as well as a Research Associate Professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School. He has been part of CBSSM and its precursors at U-M since 2002 and acts as CBSSM Associate Director.

Last Name: 
Zikmund-Fisher
Press Coverage: 
Sun, October 17, 2010

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, was featured in an interview by the U-M News Service on September 29, 2010.  Dr. Zikmund-Fisher served as the featured guest editor for a special supplement to Medical Decision Making, Sept/Oct 2010, that focused on the DECISIONS study. In the interview, Dr. Zikmund-Fisher highlighted the need for health care providers to do a better job of educating patients about the medical decisions they face.  A video highlights the findings of the study and can be found at: http://ns.umich.edu/htdocs/releases/story.php?id=8008.  CBSSM faculty also involved in the DECISIONS study included Angela Fagerlin, PhD, and Mick Couper, PhD

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, a CBSSM investigator and Director of the CBSSM Internet Survey lab, is the principal investigator on an Investigator Initiated Research award from the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making that began in October 2008.  The grant, entitled "Learning by Doing: Improving Risk Communication Through Active Processing of Interactive Pictographs," will fund the development and testing of of Flash-based interactive risk graphics that research participants or patients can use to visually demonstrate how likely they believe some event is to occur. Dr. Zikmund-Fisher hopes that people who create risk graphics themselves will have a better intuitive understanding of risk than people who just view static images. Co-investigators on the award include Angela Fagerlin, Peter A. Ubel, and Amanda Dillard.

Funded by: NIH

Funding Years: 2016-2020

In the past 30 years, the Incidence of thyroid cancer has tripled. The majority of the rise in thyroid cancer incidence is attributed to an increase in low-risk, well-differentiated thyroid cancer, a disease that has a 10-year mortality close to zero. Our previous work suggests that patients with low-risk thyroid cancer are at risk for overtreatment, defined as the use of Surgical and medical interventions in the absence of a clear survival benefit. The overtreatment of thyroid cancer has inherent costs, both to patient health and to society. The reason for the intensive management and potential overtreatment of low-risk thyroid cancer remains unclear. By using SEER-linked patient and physician Surveys, we plan to understand the Treatment decision making in low-risk thyroid cancer. We hypothesize that knowledge and attitudes influence decision making. Specifically, we anticipate that lack of knowledge of risks of death, recurrence and Treatment complications is associated with Treatment that is more intensive. in addition, we postulate that a general preference for active treatment will also be associated with more intensive cancer Treatment. Although both patient and physician perceptions of Treatment need (i.e., knowledge and attitudes) likely contribute to Treatment intensity, we anticipate that the primary driver will be physicians, even after controlling for their patients' perceptions. This study will serve as the foundation for future Intervention studies. By identifying the specific role of physician and patient knowledge and attitudes toward thyroid cancer Treatment, we will be able to create tailored educational interventions to personalize Surgical and medical care for thyroid cancer patients, thus minimizing overtreatment and its inherent risks and costs. As the rising Incidence, low mortality, and pattern of intensive Treatment make thyroid cancer arguably the best cancer model for overtreatment, this proposed study will also serve as a model to understand overtreatment in other malignancies.

PI: Megan Haymart

CO(s): Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, PhD & Sarah Hawley, PhD. MPH

IHPI Seminar Series with Drs. Fagerlin & Zikmund Fisher

Mon, February 09, 2015, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 10, Research Auditorium

IHPI Seminar Series Featuring CBSSM Researchers Angie Fagerlin and Brian Zikmund-Fisher: "Numbers, numbers, numbers: It's not just what you present, but how you present them."

Angela Fagerlin, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Internal Medicine
Co-Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health
Research Associate Professor, Internal Medicine

Monday, February 9, 2015
3:00 pm to 4:00 pm
NCRC Building 10, Research Auditorium

Berguer Lecture on Ethics: Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD

Fri, January 26, 2018, 4:00pm
Add to Calendar
Location: 
Danto Auditorium, Frankel Cardiovascular Center

6th BERGUER LECTURE ON ETHICS

"Communicating Everything Important Poorly vs. One Critical Thing Well"

Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Health and Behavior and Health Education
Research Associate Professor, Division of General Medicine, Department ofInternal Medicine
Associate Director, Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine

This lecture is open to faculty, staff, students, and the public having an interest in medical journalism, public policy and ethics.
At the conclusion of this lecture, participants will be able to acknowledge the ethical and societal importance of responsible medical journalism, and they will be able to respond to moral issues surrounding medical information in the press.
The University of Michigan Medical Schools is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
The University of Michigan Medical School designates this live activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s) TM.
Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Check out Brian Zikmund-Fisher's article in Risk Sense: “Do You Know What Messages Your Patient Stories Are Really Sending?" in which he discusses a purpose, content, and valence-based taxonomy of patient narratives in decision aids.

 More information can also be found in:  Victoria A. Shaffer and Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher (2013). All Stories Are Not Alike: A Purpose-, Content-, and Valence-Based Taxonomy of Patient Narratives in Decision Aids. Med Decis Making, 33: 4-13. doi:10.1177/0272989X12463266

 

Thu, March 17, 2016

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was quoted in the Verge article about a recent BMJ systematic review about the impact of communicating genetic risks of disease on health behavior. Dr. Zikmund-Fisher states: "The idea that providing genetic risk information is going to be transformative to everyone seems unlikely."

Thu, July 21, 2016

Due to food safety concerns, the FDA recently released a statement that strongly advises the public from indulging in raw cookie dough. In Brian Zikmund-Fisher response to the FDA's warning in The Conversation, he discusses balancing the minimization of risk with the maximization of life: "...let’s all please remind ourselves that our goal is not to minimize all risk, no matter the cost. Our goal is to maximize life. Sometimes maximizing life means warning people that their flour is contaminated and making sure they throw it out. Sometimes maximizing life means letting them enjoy some (carefully prepared) cookie dough without shame."

Research Topics: 

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