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10/29/2015

Jeremy Sussman has received much press for a recent study in JAMA about rates of treatment deintensification in diabetes. Dr. Sussman is first author of a study that found that among older diabetes patients whose treatment resulted in very low blood pressure, only a minority (27% or fewer) underwent treatment deintensification for diabetes, which represents a lost opportunity to reduce overtreatment. The study suggests practice guidelines and performance measures should place more focus on reducing overtreatment through deintensification.

Tanner Caverly and other CBSSM faculty co-authored a national survey study in JAMA examining VA primary care health-care professionals' beliefs regarding prescribing for older diabetics. This study found misperceptions about the benefits of stringent blood glucose control and concerns about negative repercussions following deintensification of therapy. This study is also being cited in a number of press articles.

10/19/2015

Beth Tarini is lead author on study published in the Journal of Pediatrics that found that few primary care physicians say they would order genetic testing or refer a child to a genetics specialist as a first step when they see children with two or more developmental delays, despite the higher risk of genetic disorders in these children. Brian Zikmund-Fisher and Wendy Uhlmann are also co-authors.

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10/01/2015

Dr. Reshma Jagsi, radiation oncologist and CBSSM research investigator, has conducted research on how doctors play a role in soliciting donations from grateful patients, and whether or not they should.

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09/29/2015

Jeffrey Kullgren was invited to write a piece for the Measuring Costs and Outcomes in Health Care, a six-week online forum designed to explore cutting-edge ways to improve quality and reduce waste, co-sponsored by the Harvard Business Review and the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Kullgren’s article focused on "How to Teach People About Healthcare Pricing".

09/24/2015

Sarah Hawley, Ph.D., professor of internal medicine, is featured in "Hour Detroit" discussing BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and the subsequent odds of developing breast cancer later in life. For women who test positive for either mutation, the conventional recommendation is to have preventive surgery.

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